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'Lava like Substance Triggers Panic' in Indian Village.

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posted on Feb, 9 2011 @ 07:18 PM
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reply to post by muzzleflash
 


coal is organic and basically carbon, coal tar smells nice and is similarly mostly hydrocarbon and organic.




posted on Feb, 9 2011 @ 07:20 PM
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reply to post by theabsolutetruth
 


I agree it would be easily recognised....but maybe not if you were an uneducated shepherd from a small group of people in a tiny village. Not saying they are but I can imagine small tribes never seeing such things and having no media to inform them on the natural world.



posted on Feb, 9 2011 @ 07:21 PM
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Considering the smell... I wonder if it's possible that it contains sulfur, being possibly related with the local seismic activity and whatnot.



posted on Feb, 9 2011 @ 07:23 PM
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reply to post by CLPrime
 


sulphur sounds like the likely culprit for the reported smell and it sounds geologically active, cracks in the earth etc so most likely.



posted on Feb, 9 2011 @ 07:24 PM
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reply to post by muzzleflash
 


Bitumin is what usually leaks and is then called tar, it seeps through the rocks and makes small pools usually, at least in the UK it does.



posted on Feb, 9 2011 @ 07:28 PM
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The rock formations process below the earth surface had created gaps resulting in creation of a weak zone in the Dolorite rocks. Explaining the phenomenon, Mohan Rao maintained that an inorganic compound solution had oozed out of the lithosphere. The lava substance is being sent to geological laboratory for a thorough study. –The Hindu


if it is indeed from the lithosphere then it is most likely a form of magma, aka lava.



posted on Feb, 9 2011 @ 07:32 PM
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Check this out. I was reading about Igneous rock formation, and maybe I found something related.


Decompression melting creates the ocean crust at mid-ocean ridges. It also causes volcanism in intraplate regions such as Europe, Africa and the Pacific sea floor. There, it is variously attributed either to the rise of mantle plumes (the "Plume hypothesis") or to intraplate extension (the "Plate hypothesis")

Decompression melt
another link to Mantle Plume theory

Just tossing some stuff out there.



posted on Feb, 9 2011 @ 07:36 PM
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What ever it is could it contain methane - thinking of the bad smell and fire?



posted on Feb, 9 2011 @ 07:41 PM
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reply to post by muzzleflash
 


mantle plume is plausible and fits well with the also plausible expanding earth theory, which seems to be being realised and more likely than pangea theory.



posted on Feb, 9 2011 @ 07:41 PM
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Originally posted by theabsolutetruth
reply to post by muzzleflash
 


coal is organic and basically carbon, coal tar smells nice and is similarly mostly hydrocarbon and organic.


Yes I realize now that Coal Tar residue has major organic constituents.

I had to find out more about PAHs and phenols.
I never had organic chemistry so I am learning it as I read.

The heterocyclic compounds threw me off. But after looking deeper into PAH and phenols, I now realize they are organic compounds.
I am a noob sorry.



posted on Feb, 9 2011 @ 07:43 PM
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reply to post by muzzleflash
 


no need for an apology.



posted on Feb, 9 2011 @ 07:44 PM
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Originally posted by theabsolutetruth
reply to post by muzzleflash
 


mantle plume is plausible and fits well with the also plausible expanding earth theory, which seems to be being realised and more likely than pangea theory.


Yeah I like mantle plume theory too.

But are there any ancient nearby volcanic sites?
The location appears to be southern-central India.

I will take a look around for some maps of extinct volcanoes nearby. Perhaps we can find a pattern?



posted on Feb, 9 2011 @ 07:46 PM
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reply to post by muzzleflash
 


on the mantle plume link there's a location hypothesis map half way down the page, it isn't detailed but could be relevant.



posted on Feb, 9 2011 @ 07:48 PM
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I'm going to take a guess that this could possible be

Flood Basalt.



Here is a paper about it: SOURCE



extending over areas of more than a million square kilometres. Flood basalts are one type of large igneous province (LIP) that characterise the Earth's surface and have been formed at various times in the geological past - some in a submarine environment and some on land (see LIP map below). Notable examples are the Siberian Traps and the Deccan Traps (trap is a Sanskrit word meaning 'step', referring to the step-like topography produced by the stacked layers of lava). The Columbia River province featured in the above photograph is minute in comparison to the size of these enormous outpourings of lava.




If there is a causal link between flood basalt events and mass extinctions, it may lie in the environmental impact of the gases released, because basalt eruptions are not particularly explosive. Several kinds of environmental effects have been suggested, including climatic cooling from sulphuric acid aerosols, greenhouse warming from CO2 and SO2 gases, and acid rain. Basaltic magmas are often very rich in dissolved sulphur, and sulphuric acid aerosols formed from sulphur volatiles (largely SO2) are injected into the stratosphere by convective plumes rising above volcanic vents and fissures.



Flood basalt episodes have been attributed to mantle plume activity, and thus may represent one facet of a host of related global geological factors (eg, changes in sea-floor spreading rates, rifting events, increased tectonism and volcanism, sea-level variations) that tend to be correlated, and may be associated with unusual climatic and environmental fluctuations that could lead to significant faunal changes. It has also been suggested that a coincidence of both a large impact and a flood basalt eruption might be necessary in causing severe mass extinctions.




I suggest that anyone interested in learning more look at the above linked paper...fascinating stuff!!
edit on 9-2-2011 by westcoast because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 9 2011 @ 07:49 PM
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reply to post by muzzleflash
 


this link details some recent Indian continent tectonic activity:

theextinctionprotocol.wordpress.com...



posted on Feb, 9 2011 @ 07:50 PM
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Originally posted by theabsolutetruth
reply to post by muzzleflash
 


on the mantle plume link there's a location hypothesis map half way down the page, it isn't detailed but could be relevant.


I am having trouble finding any relevant volcanic sites in mainland India. It appears the only active region is off coast at the Andaman Islands.

It's quite odd. I can't even find any listings of extinct volcanoes in mainland India.

The location hypothesis map on that page also does not list anything on mainland India.

This is quite bizarre and not adding up yet. We are missing something lol.



posted on Feb, 9 2011 @ 07:52 PM
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Originally posted by theabsolutetruth
reply to post by muzzleflash
 


this link details some recent Indian continent tectonic activity:

theextinctionprotocol.wordpress.com...


It lists the tremors as being localized in the North, West, and East.

But can't find anything about the southern-central region. I am sure there is something there just haven't found it yet. Will keep looking.



posted on Feb, 9 2011 @ 07:53 PM
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If you look at one of the charts in my above linked article, you will see that one of the noted Basalt fields in indeed in Rajmahal India.


The estimated dates of the younger continental flood basalts compiled from recent sources are shown in Table 1. Several lines of evidence suggest that in most instances the greatest number of individual eruptions and the largest volumes of lava probably occurred within a million years or less.



Source



Rajmahal is a city and a notified area in Sahibganj district in the Indian state of Jharkhand

edit on 9-2-2011 by westcoast because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 9 2011 @ 07:53 PM
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reply to post by muzzleflash
 


more detailed analysis

www.mantleplumes.org...



posted on Feb, 9 2011 @ 07:57 PM
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reply to post by westcoast
 


Thank you Westcoast. I will check this paper out.

The links you posted do bear strong similarities to what we are trying to figure out.

I will read more to figure this out.

Meanwhile here is a link to the location on the map in case anyone is wondering about that.
Malkapuram India

The location is really bizarre imo.



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