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Mars Terraformed. And The Future Earth!

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posted on Feb, 9 2011 @ 05:11 AM
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Mars Today


NASA/JPL

Mars Terraformed


Artists impression.
Courtesy: acceleratingfuture


What would Mars look like a few thousand years from now? Most current evidence points to the theory that billions of years ago, Mars was a warm and wet planet. Orbiting probes have sent back images showing water-carved features on Mars, such as canyons and river valleys. But today, Mars is a lifeless dry, desert-like world mostly devoid of water and with a thin atmosphere of mostly carbon dioxide.

Mars contains all of the chemical elements needed for life. It is therefore within the realms of possibility that its environment can be changed to make it hospitable for colonization by Earth-based organisms, including human beings.

But how can this be done?

The first phase would be to heat up the planet by directing the Sun's energy toward the surface by building large mirrors in orbit, to reflect the sunlight downward onto the surface. Heating the surface would cause rocks to outgas, thickening the atmosphere. Another way to turn up the heat would be to introduce super-greenhouse gases that would provide an artificial layer in the atmosphere which could begin a greenhouse effect on Mars.

The second phase, after the carbon dioxide atmosphere has been thickened significantly, would be to utilize the process of photosynthesis, by introducing simple plant life like lichens and blue-green algae that could breathe in the carbon dioxide and breathe out the most important gas for humans – oxygen.

Though the actual process for terraforming Mars would take several hundred years, it could well be initiated within the next thousand years or so.


Mars transition.
Courtesy: Daein Ballard


But why terraform Mars at all?

In the not too distant future, the sun will continue to get brighter until eventually, Earth becomes too hot to inhabit. Previous calculations had pegged that time at about a billion years from now, but a new paper argues that earlier models had neglected the role of atmospheric pressure in regulating the temperature of the planet on astronomical time scales. In other words, this could happen sooner than predicted!

The future Earth?



It is therefore imperative for humanity to find another home – Mars. However, in populating a new area we often first think of how it would benefit us. Rarely do we think of how we might ruin what already exists. But for mankind to survive, is there a choice?

And finally, was Earth terraformed too, millions of years ago by a Type III civilization? We probably will never know the answer to that one!



Ref:
library.thinkquest.org...
en.wikipedia.org...
www.acceleratingfuture.com...
mcdlifesciences.com...

edit on 9-2-2011 by OrionHunterX because: (no reason given)



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posted on Feb, 9 2011 @ 05:39 AM
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When I read articles like this, it makes me so sad as I know I wont be around to see it.

Imagine how exciting this would be if they could do this within our lifetime



posted on Feb, 9 2011 @ 06:46 AM
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reply to post by OrionHunterX
 


Very interesting


A sobering reminder that the act of terraforming Mars isn't just something that will remain within the realms of science fiction, at some point, humanity will need to take ideas like this seriously.

That's if we're still around in a billion years, of course.

Great pictures too.



posted on Feb, 9 2011 @ 07:45 AM
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Yes! That's amazing!
I wish I could be there to see this happen. But why only Mars?

Terraforming Venus....


Rochelimit's Symbology of Astronomy


In the future, the nickname “Sister Planet” will be much more appropriate for Venus. Unlike Mars and Moon, Venus has almost the same escape velocity as earth does (about 90% Earth’ gravity), so the Earth-feeling will still be there in Venus. Venus will probably be a more fertile planet than Earth does, because land and water are well-spread in Venus, so mild water-influenced weather is basically everywhere.

The extreme thing about Venus is that there will be no seasonal change in Venus. A terraformed Mars will have season, but with a rotational tilt of 0, Venus will have no season at all. And the most shocking thing is that the sun always rises in the west and sets in the east, after 8 months of lingering in the sky.


And then there's Europa and Titan. The possibility of the human race spreading out into the Solar System is endless!


symbology-astronomy.blogspot.com...


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posted on Feb, 9 2011 @ 07:55 AM
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reply to post by OrionHunterX
 


Very cool, but how about we start with a wasteland much closer to home, say, Detroit?
edit on 9-2-2011 by pajoly because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 9 2011 @ 08:04 AM
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It would be nice but the biggest problem is the lack of a magnetosphere on Mars, there is no protection from solar and cosmic particles.

Without that, Mars will remain a dusty rock.



posted on Feb, 9 2011 @ 08:10 AM
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reply to post by OrionHunterX
 


Wow, this is a very interesting concept, and it's too bad we won't be around to see it. Then the next problem would be how to get all these people there, but I'm sure by the time this would happen they would have technology to transport large amounts of people to another planet.



posted on Feb, 9 2011 @ 08:10 AM
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The idea of terraforming mars is one that excites me; however, the biggest obstacle to accomplishing this is the necessity to restart the core of the planet so that a magnetic field is created to shield it, and it's atmosphere, from solar wind and radiation. If we can figure out how to do that then the rest would be a piece of cake...given a few hundred/thousand years.




posted on Feb, 9 2011 @ 09:08 AM
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Originally posted by Chadwickus
It would be nice but the biggest problem is the lack of a magnetosphere on Mars, there is no protection from solar and cosmic particles.

Without that, Mars will remain a dusty rock.

Agreed! However, recently, Mars Pathfinder returned a measurement which suggested that Mars has a large iron core. The Mars Global Surveyor measurements show that Mars has a magnetic field. A thousand years from now, scientists would perhaps acquire the knowledge to kick start the 'dynamo' to produce a viable magnetosphere to shield Mars from solar radiation and cosmic particles.

Just imagine what science has achieved in the last 100 years and the progress has been fairly breathtaking. We're looking at a time line of a thousand years!



posted on Feb, 9 2011 @ 11:04 AM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Feb, 9 2011 @ 11:06 AM
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An extremely large quantity of hydrogen peroxcide introduced to the surface would make a livable enviroment



posted on Feb, 9 2011 @ 11:12 AM
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Originally posted by pajoly
reply to post by OrionHunterX
 


Very cool, but how about we start with a wasteland much closer to home, say, Detroit?
edit on 9-2-2011 by pajoly because: (no reason given)

Very good pajoly! You make a valid and important point here. Op, thankyou for sharing this, flag for sure!



posted on Feb, 9 2011 @ 11:41 AM
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This "Terraforming" seems pure speculation, of course.

Have they asked to the owners if they want change their world?

I, frankly, don' think that the respective inhabitants of Mars, Titan, Ganimede, Europa, Callisto, Rhea etc... are favorable or in agreement with the exogenous modification of their planet and their atmosphere.

edit on 9-2-2011 by Arken because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 9 2011 @ 01:52 PM
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reply to post by Aggie Man
 


parhaps we could build a solar powered MegaHAARP that orbits mars and continuously beams energy directly to Mars' core to restart it? but more than likely the Gov't would turn that thing around and point it at us!

Or we could start collecting our own carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases and putting them into ballistic tanks and then firing them via long vertical magnetic rails towards Mars where they impact Mars' surface and release the gases.

....sorry, my imagination ran loose a lil bit.



posted on Feb, 9 2011 @ 01:59 PM
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If Mars was once a warm wet planet with an atmosphere it must at one point have had a magnetosphere. Is the more important question, more important they terraforming proposals, not figuring out why it stopped?

Or am I missing the point? Genuine question.



posted on Feb, 9 2011 @ 02:33 PM
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An arc, parent robots, and a cloneable team of genius scientists. Let's get them out there right now.



posted on Feb, 9 2011 @ 03:43 PM
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reply to post by Arken
 


Very true. What if these planets do have inteligent life. Just because we cannot find them yet does not mean they are not there. Now just think of another species more advanced than us and differing in their anatomy that they have to breath a different atmosphere than ours. Would you welcome them to alter our atmosphere for them to survive. Sooner rather than later we have got to go to the stars to survive as a race and mars is just a small stepping stone for humanity. I too wish I could be around to venture into the stars.



posted on Feb, 9 2011 @ 04:25 PM
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This stuff is SO fascinating!!
I'm always deeply intrigued by this. The thing that brings me back to Earth though is just imagine how much further we would be as a race if we put all our intelligence into this stuff, versus all the weapons and wars. Humanity would be so much more awesome if we didn't need feel the need to destroy ourselves and instead realized we're on this planet together... and if we want to survive, we need to figure out how to get off this planet together.

I, like many of you, am saddened that I most likely won't be around to see this stuff. With NASA not even willing to return to the Moon for many years, who knows how long the government will hold us back.

I think for tonight, I'm going to stare into the sky and imagine humans as a non-violent race and that we are spread out among the stars. The vast and infinite possibilities of our beautiful Universe. Good thread, OP!



posted on Feb, 9 2011 @ 04:28 PM
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Originally posted by bluedrake
When I read articles like this, it makes me so sad as I know I wont be around to see it.

Imagine how exciting this would be if they could do this within our lifetime


'Our lifetimes' becomes a relative term once we have harnessed time travel.


I wish I had something to say for the second line.

Khar



posted on Feb, 9 2011 @ 04:31 PM
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Originally posted by bluedrake
When I read articles like this, it makes me so sad as I know I wont be around to see it.

Imagine how exciting this would be if they could do this within our lifetime

That shouldn't make you near as sad as you should be realizing how many great things we are missing *right now* that are happening through out the universe. Beautiful, amazing life technologies, spectacular feats of planetary engineering, exploration of newly found jungle planets, ignition of newly constructed star systems to supply energy, etc.

We are missing out on all of it, right now, and what we earthlings will do in the future is nothing compared to that.


edit on 9-2-2011 by harrytuttle because: typo



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