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My Journey Inside a Privately Owned Massive Underground Storage Complex

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posted on Feb, 11 2011 @ 05:32 AM
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A few years back Iron Mountain was shown in pretty good depth along with the same sort of Commercial storage also operating in Cheyenne Mountain. I think it was on Modern Marvels or something on Discovery. They were constantly excavating new spaces out of both locations and said the large majority of the customers were indeed using the spaces for "Secure Document Storage". It was pretty cool but nothing too exciting about any of it.
edit on 11-2-2011 by Candycab because: (no reason given)




posted on Feb, 12 2011 @ 01:50 AM
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Originally posted by dirtycrickrat
is it possible that iron mountian could have links to the alleged d.u.m.b. s that people speculate of with the underground high speed trains?


I seriously think the "DUMB" thing is disinfo.. just the acronym alone sort of makes me twig on it a bit. I mean seriously - DUMB?



posted on Mar, 10 2011 @ 11:41 AM
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reply to post by Yazman
 


bump

i understand the acronym being a little dumb. lol but it is a deep underground facility and thats fact.
every govt branch has a nerve center there including the military.
they dont just shred paper and store paper there.



posted on Mar, 10 2011 @ 10:57 PM
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Possibly there are the servers for the computer network of the White House there...?



posted on Mar, 10 2011 @ 11:37 PM
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reply to post by dirtycrickrat
 


I have a good friend who has worked for USIS at Iron Mountain for at least 10 years. From all he's told me about the place, the OP is pretty acurate with his descrption.



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 04:33 AM
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reply to post by dirtycrickrat
 


Just got off the phone with my friend who works inside Iron Mountain. Most of what the OP is accurate. In the last ten years, he sees armed guards, but never saw AR-15s or M-16's. They don't take his phone when he enters (as his cell doesnt work underground anyway).. He, like the majority of others, park topside and walk a long ramp to elevators that take them to their office . They pass armed guards (no rifles), and continue to work.. He seems to know nothing about any restaurants there (and knowing him, he would provide a shnitty tip). He really had no more to say, just a place to go to work. Albeit interesting..



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 06:02 AM
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nice thread op reading it was almost like being there lol
that place sounds really cool too, if only i could get in...



posted on Mar, 13 2011 @ 04:43 PM
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they most defiantly took my cell phone at the gate and the guards inside were armed with assault rifles. maybe they arent armed all the time and i caught them on a high security alert/exercise day? i really dont know, but when i was there they were armed. as for the restaurants i myself did not see any. i was going by the news report.


my friend who works with me at the pizza shop has worked for a fireproofing subcontractor at the mine.
he wants to join and post his stories as he has been all over the place in there. he was never really restricted to working in only 1 area of the place like most employed there.

hes afraid posting info about his job could compromise future employment with the company.
hopefully i can get him on here because his stories are pretty interesting.
edit on 13-3-2011 by dirtycrickrat because: (no reason given)
edit on 13-3-2011 by dirtycrickrat because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 13 2011 @ 04:45 PM
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Originally posted by scooterstrats
reply to post by dirtycrickrat
 


Just got off the phone with my friend who works inside Iron Mountain. Most of what the OP is accurate. In the last ten years, he sees armed guards, but never saw AR-15s or M-16's. They don't take his phone when he enters (as his cell doesnt work underground anyway).. He, like the majority of others, park topside and walk a long ramp to elevators that take them to their office . They pass armed guards (no rifles), and continue to work.. He seems to know nothing about any restaurants there (and knowing him, he would provide a shnitty tip). He really had no more to say, just a place to go to work. Albeit interesting..


your friend isn't a visitor to the site. he/she is an employee. im assuming thats why they dont take his/her and every employees cell phones every day.



posted on Mar, 13 2011 @ 09:36 PM
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reply to post by dirtycrickrat
 

PLease dont misunderstand, i am NOT discrediting your story, it makes total sense. Just giving a different view, BTW, my bud doesnt like to talk on the phone too much about the place period. Get him out after a few beers, he tells stories.



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 05:18 PM
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reply to post by scooterstrats
 


no i understand completely and thats exactly how my friend is too. i showed him this thread and he really would like to share his stories but he really doesn't feel comfortable posting about it on a public forum.



posted on Jul, 29 2012 @ 10:24 PM
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i saw a recent thread here on ats titled "9 of worlds most ridiculously secure safes and vaults" and iron mountian was featured on this list, and i figured id add it to my story on here even though i made this thread a long while ago.

heres a link to the original story
www.mentalfloss.com...



posted on Aug, 6 2012 @ 10:35 AM
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This is my first post on ATS, I'm Currently learning more about military facilities and have an interest in the DUMB's.

Here's a link to a list of US DUMB's in various states: educate-yourself.org... I hope it's of interest to you all.

I'm currently doing some research into the manzano moutain DUMB and it's possible connection with the Roswell UFO incident.



posted on Aug, 6 2012 @ 11:15 AM
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here are the drawbacks to underground bunkers....they may have only 1 or 2 "entrances" to the outside world...they may be able to withstand a nuclear blast, but, if the blast happens at the entrance, everything inside is sealed up from the outside world. trying to dig yourself out (in the case of iron mountain) requires heavy equipment, which need power and ventilation, and a place to put all of the removed debris. then there is the amount of time this would take, coupled with the prospects of what would it be like outside. would an enemy simply park a few tanks, or armed vehicles, with a few dozen troops at the stratigic locations (air vents, backdoors, underwater escapes) and wait it out... if the surrounding area was hit with a nuclear blast you would have dangerous levels of radioactive ground for miles around the exit points, coupled with the fact that anything moving in these areas would surely be easily noticed (not much activity in a nuclear blast zone), by people outside the safety perimeter....and let's not forget that limestone is porous, whatever is water-soluable could, over time, leak down and cause problems if it is not constantly monitored, filtered, and the byproducts stored.
there is also human nature, what kind of living conditions would evolve over time? fights over leadership, rations, jealousies, crime...people that would naturally want to leave, against those that would want to wait longer. remember, even though you might be guarenteed of survival by living underground, doesn't mean you will be able to start up a socialized civilization, if and when you emerge.
to me, a slow death sitting among all the worlds greatest achievements, data, and worthwhile riches, still means you will die buried in the ground.



posted on Aug, 6 2012 @ 11:36 AM
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They may build tunnels that exit miles from the base for that very reason. If the mountain the base is under just got hit with a nuke. You might want an egress tunnel that dumps you out 20 miles or so away.



posted on Aug, 6 2012 @ 01:28 PM
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Originally posted by BASSPLYR
They may build tunnels that exit miles from the base for that very reason. If the mountain the base is under just got hit with a nuke. You might want an egress tunnel that dumps you out 20 miles or so away.


that type of massive dig would bring some attention. the machinery needed, along with the "dumps" of fill debris would be extensive. it would not go un-noticed...a tunnel of that size stretching 20 miles, is even today a large, complex undertaking. just look at the efforts of recent tunneling projects through the alps in europe to get some idea of the scope.





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