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Motorway Maximus: Unearthed, A Stunning Roman Super-Highway Built 1,900 Years Ago

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posted on Feb, 5 2011 @ 12:10 PM
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Motorway Maximus: Unearthed, A Stunning Roman Super-Highway Built 1,900 Years Ago


www.dai lymail.co.uk

Now, some 2,000 years after it was built, it has been uncovered in the depths of a forest in Dorset...

‘It is absolutely huge and unlike anything I have ever seen. Here you have a large road with huge ditches either side. It is raised very high which is unusual. It is only speculation, but the height might have been to make a statement.

‘It is thought this was a road made early in the occupation and not used for long. If so, then it would have been incredibly impressive to the local people.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Feb, 5 2011 @ 12:10 PM
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Imagine the sight of a Roman Legion marching along...wow. Not that I am a fan of Rome, or its legions.


I find the most interesting aspect of this road is its height, that it was raised.

The forest of Norway Spruce fir trees in Puddletown Forest were cut down in order to uncover the half-mile long section of road between London and Exeter.

It was part of the road that went from Badbury Rings to the fort at Dorchester and was part of the network of roads from Old Sarum (now Salisbury) to Exeter.





www.dai lymail.co.uk
(visit the link for the full news article)
edit on 5-2-2011 by burntheships because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 5 2011 @ 12:18 PM
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Nice find.

Thanks for sharing.



posted on Feb, 5 2011 @ 12:27 PM
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reply to post by Julie Washington
 


Nice change from the usual.


What are your thoughts on the structure of the road,
and the raised area, compared to the pictures?

I wonder if this was done to keep that area dry, out of the water?


I found one other article on it...



The 1,900-year-old highway was constructed to run from London to Exeter and experts believe it was intended to show the might of the Roman Empire.

The road, which is 85ft wide and stands on 15ft earthworks, has deep ditches on either side.

Forestry Commission staff had been aware that it existed but because it was so densely covered by trees, they were unable to find it.


www.express.co.uk...



posted on Feb, 5 2011 @ 12:54 PM
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I wonder if this was done to keep that area dry, out of the water?



I was thinking the same thing. I also wonder, how do they know it's a road. Maybe it's a dike or some kind of irrigation system. The story at the beginning of the article sounded a little corny to me, and completely made up. It makes me wonder about the whole thing. Don't get me wrong, I think it's really neat whether it's a road or something completely different.



posted on Feb, 5 2011 @ 12:58 PM
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reply to post by stealthXninja
 


I understand, I had similar thoughts.

I did a little research on it, and its in the right spot. Also, that artists rendering is not recent.

It makes sense, also they have worked in conjunction with
Peter Addison, from English Heritage, who located the section and was stunned by its scale.

A little info in Peter Addison....
www.forestry.gov.uk...




Map Source Credit
edit on 5-2-2011 by burntheships because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 5 2011 @ 01:14 PM
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reply to post by burntheships
 


Thanks for the link. This is pretty interesting. I wonder what they will do with the road once they finish uncovering it? Will it be fixed up and driven on? Will it be just a tourist site for people to walk around on? Will the forestry department use it as an access/maintenance road?



posted on Feb, 5 2011 @ 01:22 PM
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Nice find! I have always held a fascination with Roman Engineering. They accomplished some spectacular things. However, in regards to this super highway theory, it seems a little rushed in the designation? Plus, it does not seem to be a typical Roman road, no stones?



Some have already mentioned that it may have been used for irrigation and keeping the area dry? England is a wet place, and that theory makes a lot of sense. Moreover, what strategic advantage would there be by elevating the road? If anything, it leaves any Roman bureaucrat or soldiers traveling on it as targets to archers, sling shots, rocks, or other assaults by an unhappy populace enduring occupation? Nineteen-hundred years ago was the early stages of the Roman Occupation of the British Isle.

Now, I am clear that in warfare an elevated position is paramount, but in the case of where these roads were found that notion would have severely hampered the Roman's observations of the land around them. If it is densely wood now, then it was densely wooded then. Moreover, they would have had to clear large tracts of land as a safety precaution before using the road, if it was a road to begin with? Furthermore, it would have been prime real estate for Celt guerrillas to mount ambushes as the soldiers left formation to descend the mound to investigate any disturbance coming from the woods. So, I am a little bit skeptical of the true intentions for this Roman engineering marvel, and it seems the historians are pouring it on for dramatic affect before any corroborative investigation has been initiated. Great find though!
edit on 5-2-2011 by Jakes51 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 5 2011 @ 01:41 PM
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The Romans build highways, for the sake of the tolls they would recieve. If only they were interested in our wellbeing. Like todays leaders, its all about control and power.

Nonetheless interesting find....



posted on Feb, 5 2011 @ 01:59 PM
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It is not actually all that amazing, any one who knows their European history, would already know that the Romans built their roads on top of already existing, Celtic trading and invasion routes, as the Gauls were renown for sacking Rome for centuries before they finally reorganized under Julius the Caesar, of then Gallic Wars.

Of course, as old as I am I would remember the good ole days.
If wars were still fought today as they were then, I suspect we may have less.



posted on Feb, 5 2011 @ 03:19 PM
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reply to post by stealthXninja
 


Parts of the road were uncovered its makeup consists of gravel underneath, one way they determined it was a Roman road.

Article says...

The section uncovered was built from gravel and is amazingly well-preserved thanks to never having been under the plough and later covered with a dense pine wood


www.dailymail.co.uk... T


Between deep ditches: Experts believe the road's scale was to deliberately intimidate the locals - the site of a Roman legion marching along the road would have had the desired effect



posted on Feb, 5 2011 @ 03:25 PM
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reply to post by Jakes51
 


Jakes, its a hoot to see us all "debunk: the road. Funny us here at ATS just wont take things at surface value...
myself included.

i did find some more "evidence" that lends to the credence this is acutally a historical road.

What did the Romans ever do for Puddletown Forest?

In partnership with English Heritage, the Forestry Commission has undertaken an impressive restoration project to reveal a hidden archaeological treasure, literally under our very feet.

By clear felling a plantation of Norway Spruce fir trees in Puddletown Forest (near Dorchester), the Forestry Commission has painstakingly uncovered one of the UK’s most remarkable sections of ancient Roman road.

The 26 metre-wide road is a combination of a central cobbled ‘street’, which would have been used for rapid troop movements, and outer ‘droving’ roads for livestock.
It is thought the road is part of the Ackling Dyke Roman Road, built in the early first century to link Old Sarum (Salisbury) with the Roman fort at Exeter.

Pete Wilson, Head of Research Policy (Roman Archaeology) for English Heritage explained:

“Roman roads were built in support of the military and civilian administration of a newly conquered province. The well-preserved length surviving in Puddletown Forest pays eloquent testimony to the power and determination of the Romans to consolidate their new territory. The scale and solidity of their work have allowed the road to survive the 1600 years since the end of Roman Britain.”


www.forestry.gov.uk...

So it seems that there are connecting roads / areas that may have the stones, this may have been used for livestock also? Thats the "historians" take on it.



posted on Feb, 5 2011 @ 04:59 PM
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reply to post by ADVISOR
 


It's still petty amazing even if someone built the roads before Romans... I mean just the fact that it was built so long ago in a seemingly somewhat similar fashion to modern roads and held up so well for all these years is pretty amazing in my opinion.




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