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What's behind the Egyptian turmoil?

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posted on Feb, 5 2011 @ 08:19 AM
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Why Egypt? Why now? These questions came to mind with the recent events. Such is the thinking of an ATS contributor. It's not good enough to accept what the talking heads feed me. That the desire to oust Mubarek had finally reached critical mass after nearly 30 years.

Egypt is from what I understand a resource poor country. It is hard to fathom that a Muslim fundamentalist, military general or the CFR puppet, Mohammed ElBaradei, will change the lives of the oppressed people of Egypt.


On 27 January 2011, Mohamed ElBaradei returned to Egypt amid ongoing turmoil, with the biggest mass protests in 30 years, which had begun two days earlier, on the 25th January 2011. ElBaradei declared himself ready to lead a transitional government if that was the will of the nation, saying that: "If [people] want me to lead the transition, I will not let them down". - Wiki


Interesting that the now gun-ho ElBaradei did not run against Mubarek in the 2005 elections.

Back on point. Why Egypt? Why now? This for a starter:

Egyptian military delegation at Pentagon for annual meeting


Awkward timing -- or a potentially restraining influence on the behavior of Egyptian security forces? - Laura Rozen




posted on Feb, 5 2011 @ 08:25 AM
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reply to post by Hemisphere
 


Egypt peaked oil in nineties. It used to export oil now import exceeds import. With growing population it is impossible to feed and clothe everyone.

Why now? Because obviously Mubarak can't deal with Egypt's economic problems and social tension so the starving people of Egypt are bringing him down.



posted on Feb, 5 2011 @ 08:28 AM
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The timing seemed perfect with the Egyptian high command out of the picture. They could have quelled the violence whether you agree with that or not. I think an Internet onslaught at this precise time brought whatever unrest that existed to a boil. By the time that Mubarek shut down the Internet and the military command returned, the damage was done. I think this was orchestrated from outside Egypt. I think that the CFR is the culprit. The reasoning? Disrupting oil supplies and ultimately the food supplies of the world. The unrest has spread as you've seen. Other moderate Arab states are in similar upheaval. This morning, from the AP:

Egyptian turmoil helping to lift oil, food prices



posted on Feb, 5 2011 @ 08:32 AM
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Originally posted by archasama
reply to post by Hemisphere
 


Egypt peaked oil in nineties. It used to export oil now import exceeds import. With growing population it is impossible to feed and clothe everyone.

Why now? Because obviously Mubarak can't deal with Egypt's economic problems and social tension so the starving people of Egypt are bringing him down.


Thanks for posting. My point was that no one can deal with Egypt's economic problems. Whoever replaces him will not feed the people. It is a near impossibility. If you can't grow your own, you must purchase it. You need something to exchange and as I mentioned, Egypt is resource poor. Continue reading the thread, I have more information. Thanks!



posted on Feb, 5 2011 @ 08:43 AM
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In my estimation, Egypt will never regain what little prosperity it had. Times will be tough for the entire world from here on. Resource poor nations will be hurt first and hardest. Anyone planning a trip to see the pyramids any time soon? Just thought I'd ask.

Who stand to gain? Those that control the oil as always. Control of the oil is control of the food and that will be clear to all now if was not prior.

The Great Food Crisis of 2011


As the new year begins, the price of wheat is setting an all-time high in the United Kingdom. Food riots are spreading across Algeria. Russia is importing grain to sustain its cattle herds until spring grazing begins. India is wrestling with an 18-percent annual food inflation rate, sparking protests. China is looking abroad for potentially massive quantities of wheat and corn. The Mexican government is buying corn futures to avoid unmanageable tortilla price rises. And on January 5, the U.N. Food and Agricultural organization announced that its food price index for December hit an all-time high.


How extreme weather could create a global food crisis

Will The Bizarre Weather Of 2010 Set The Stage For A Major Global Food Shortage In 2011?

Price Shocks, Food Shortages And Global Economic Riots In 2011?



posted on Feb, 5 2011 @ 08:47 AM
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Well, at least we now know what was being discussed during the peace talks back in Sept 2010.

Everyone needs to keep their eyes out for the bait and switch, something else is going on.




posted on Feb, 5 2011 @ 09:03 AM
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I'd say decades of oppression and corruption is reason #1.

The timing issue is clearly influenced by other uprisings in the region due to similar circumstances, beginning with Iran last year and Tunisia more recently. The information age in which we live makes people able to "mobilize" in a whole different way. Egypt is not first and sure won't be last. Jordan and Yemen is going through the same thing and Syria is also starting to simmer.

The meeting with the US is no big surprise either; Egypt has been an important ally to the US in that region for a long time. Egypt has been an important player in the Israel-Palestina talks.
The Egyptian military have been under direct US influence, both in the terms of equipment and advisors. Now they want to make sure that if the regime gets overthrown, the military leadership will remain in place thus keeping the "channel" open for communication in the future.
What the US is telling its Egyptian counterparts right now is probably to not open fire on civilians. That would damage the diplomacy between the countries greatly.



posted on Feb, 5 2011 @ 09:03 AM
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I can find dozens of articles from mainstream and alternative news sources describing the coming food shortages. There are recent threads here on ATS describing and warning of what is to come. A large part of Australia is under flooding. That alone would be catastrophic in terms of food supplies in that region. We have a time of extreme weather patterns and various natural occurrences disrupting food production. The food supply of the world has become ever more dependent on oil.



You never let a serious crisis go to waste. And what I mean by that it's an opportunity to do things you think you could not do before. - Rahm Emanuel


I think this is exactly what is at work here. We have globalist elites stirring the pot of unrest at the most opportune moment to accomplish various segments of their agenda. Depopulation for one. I think that Soros, Brzezinski and the CFR is behind what is happening in the middle east. For those that are unfamiliar. The following in my opinion a brilliant and all encompassing article on the Council on Foreign Relations.

The Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) and The New World Order


If one group is effectively in control of national governments and multinational corporations; promotes world government through control of media, foundation grants, and education; and controls and guides the issues of the day; then they control most options available. The Council on Foreign Relations (CFR), and the financial powers behind it, have done all these things, and promote the "New World Order", as they have for over seventy years.



posted on Feb, 5 2011 @ 09:07 AM
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el Baradei is an opportunist. He has been in political exile for many years and now he sees his chance to return to power.
It seems, however, that the Egyptian people have a mild interest in him.

What is the real threat in the uprisings in all these locations, besides the risk of large-scale bloodshed, is fundamentalists taking over like what happened in Iran after the shah got overthrown.
Hopefully this won't happen again, but one can never be too sure.



posted on Feb, 5 2011 @ 09:10 AM
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Originally posted by Raud
I'd say decades of oppression and corruption is reason #1.

The timing issue is clearly influenced by other uprisings in the region due to similar circumstances, beginning with Iran last year and Tunisia more recently. The information age in which we live makes people able to "mobilize" in a whole different way. Egypt is not first and sure won't be last. Jordan and Yemen is going through the same thing and Syria is also starting to simmer.

The meeting with the US is no big surprise either; Egypt has been an important ally to the US in that region for a long time. Egypt has been an important player in the Israel-Palestina talks.
The Egyptian military have been under direct US influence, both in the terms of equipment and advisors. Now they want to make sure that if the regime gets overthrown, the military leadership will remain in place thus keeping the "channel" open for communication in the future.
What the US is telling its Egyptian counterparts right now is probably to not open fire on civilians. That would damage the diplomacy between the countries greatly.



Excellent points. My point is that any change in leadership will have no positive pay off for the people. This will pacify them for a very short time if at all. Food and affluence will not follow a regime change. Egypt has only the Suez Canal and outside interests will run the show there via the new puppet. When the strife is over, there will be even less resources to put Egypt back together. Whatever damage is being caused now will remain. Just my opinion.



posted on Feb, 5 2011 @ 09:14 AM
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posted on Feb, 5 2011 @ 09:15 AM
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reply to post by Hemisphere
 


Blaming the CFR and "NWO" is the exact type of things that these governments now under fire do to rid themselves from blame.
It is a typical pattern seen, not only in the middle East but also in former Soviet republics; blame everything on western influences.
This causes great damage not only to truth but also to the peace process and to individuals working there, mainly reporters. A few days ago, a Swedish correspondant got severely stabbed in the back, suspected of being from the Israeli intelligence service.

If you would have lived your life in one of these countries you would understand that the need for a CFR/NWO connection would be totally superfluous.
Unless you are concidering the US influences in Egypt who has been looking the other way concerning violations of human rights in exchange for stable diplomatic contacts. That would be more of a probable conspiracy.



posted on Feb, 5 2011 @ 09:20 AM
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reply to post by Hemisphere
 


By looking at history it is pretty easy to predict that the more totalitarian the regime has been, the greater the power vaccuum it leaves behind.
Also, violent uprisings brings together forces that would otherwise have been stark opponents and as such they will resume their conflict as their mutual enemy is beaten and struggle to fill that vaccuum begins.



posted on Feb, 5 2011 @ 09:41 AM
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In the US, our puppet president and elected officials could not have acted any faster in throwing long time ally Mubarek under the bus.

President Obama Says He Hopes "Patriot" Mubarak ‘Makes the Right Decision’


The president said “in light of what's happened over the last two weeks, going back to the old ways is not going to work. Suppression's not going to work. Engaging in violence is not going to work. Attempting to shut down information flows is not going to work…The only thing that will work is moving a orderly transition process that begins right now that engages all the parties, that leads to democratic practices, fair and free elections, and representative government that is responsive to the grievances of the Egyptian people.”


"Attempting to shut down information flows is not going to work…" Hmmm! Where have we heard that before?

Bill would give president emergency control of Internet

It apparently "takes one to know one" Mr. Obama.

Obama to Mubarak: “I Told You this Would Happen!”


But Obama has abandoned the type of public pressure on human rights that was a hallmark of the Bush administration and that could have put us in a better position with new leadership and the population should Mubarak fall. And, as under Bush, the real behind-the-scenes pressure for change has been minimal.

Now what we have is an administration retreating from its support of an ally who has been extremely helpful to us on Iraq, Iran, and the Middle East peace process. White House Press Secretary Robert Gibbs declined to even say that the United States backs Mubarak.


VP Biden, ever the loose cannon, speaks his mind on Mubarek here:

Joe Biden: "Speaker Boehner and I are Friends"


When asked during an interview with PBS' "NewsHour," if the time had "come for President Mubarak of Egypt to go," Biden said "no."

"No. I think the time has come for President Mubarak to begin to move in the direction that - to be more responsive to some... of the needs of the people out there," said the vice president. "We're encouraging the protesters to - as they assemble, do it peacefully. And we're encouraging the government to act responsibly and - and to try to engage in a discussion as to what the legitimate claims being made are, if they are, and try to work them out."

He also declined to classify Egypt's president as a dictator.

"Mubarak has been an ally of ours in a number of things," Biden said. "And he's been very responsible on, relative to geopolitical interest in the region, the Middle East peace efforts; the actions Egypt has taken relative to normalizing relationship with - with Israel. ... I would not refer to him as a dictator."


I suspect that VP Biden did not receive his CFR directive prior to that interview. But apparently Senator McCain did:

John McCain Advocates For Democracy in Egypt: "We Need To Be On The Right Side Of History"

"Right side of history"? Why the need? You are writing history through the CFR Senator.

And so our one party system is showing itself once more. Jack asses and pachyderms climbing over each other to look good to Soros and his cronies. Dictators are so passe' and repugnant, that is excepting those in the shadows.



posted on Feb, 5 2011 @ 09:56 AM
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Grievances for Egyptian protesters have focused on legal and political issues[16] including police brutality,[11] state of emergency laws,[11] lack of free elections and free speech,[17] and corruption,[17] as well as economic issues including high unemployment,[18] food price inflation,[18] and low minimum wages.


en.wikipedia.org...

Why now? Tunisia, probably.



posted on Feb, 5 2011 @ 09:57 AM
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Egypt and the world are in for hard(er) times ahead. You disrupt the oil, you disrupt the food, there will be more hungry people clamoring to be saved by a world government. There are undoubtedly people that need more in Egypt, that number will increase. That number will increase world-wide as a result of what has transpired in recent days. My contention is that the Egyptian people are but pawns to those pushing the buttons. We are all pawns in this game.

Oil prices will rise, food supplies will dwindle, unemployment will rise, stock indexes will plummet and countries by the dozen will collapse. All of these things were near to reality, the current middle east turmoil is the tipping point. I would love to wrong on this.

In my opinion, this has been orchestrated and not by those most affected.
edit on 5-2-2011 by Hemisphere because: Whatever



posted on Feb, 5 2011 @ 10:04 AM
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Originally posted by Eliad

Grievances for Egyptian protesters have focused on legal and political issues[16] including police brutality,[11] state of emergency laws,[11] lack of free elections and free speech,[17] and corruption,[17] as well as economic issues including high unemployment,[18] food price inflation,[18] and low minimum wages.



You certain that was not regarding the US? Some things are the same the world over. The degree to which these things exist is the difference. We are very pampered, comfortable slaves in the west. That's changing.



posted on Feb, 5 2011 @ 10:16 AM
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Originally posted by Raud
reply to post by Hemisphere
 


Blaming the CFR and "NWO" is the exact type of things that these governments now under fire do to rid themselves from blame.


There is a very good reason for that. These governments and their puppet leaders, Mubarek for instance, are under the control and in collusion with the CFR and NWO. You don't think they operate in a vacuum? This relation is typically how they come to power and remain there for whatever length of time is allowed. And "allowed" is the key word. This was the perfect time to throw out Mubarek for the globalist agenda. Why him when there are so many corrupt leaders and oppressed peoples to choose from? Location, location, location!

My friend, there is no honor among thieves. They eat their own.



posted on Feb, 5 2011 @ 10:52 AM
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Originally posted by Hemisphere
The timing seemed perfect with the Egyptian high command out of the picture. They could have quelled the violence whether you agree with that or not. I think an Internet onslaught at this precise time brought whatever unrest that existed to a boil. By the time that Mubarek shut down the Internet and the military command returned, the damage was done. I think this was orchestrated from outside Egypt. I think that the CFR is the culprit. The reasoning? Disrupting oil supplies and ultimately the food supplies of the world. The unrest has spread as you've seen. Other moderate Arab states are in similar upheaval. This morning, from the AP:

Egyptian turmoil helping to lift oil, food prices


Of course it was orchestrated from out side, and has been years in the making, all this unrest didn't just spring up over night,

Can you imagine Obama stepping down just because we protested,

I think not.

and I think we were in on it, well not me personally, lol



posted on Feb, 5 2011 @ 10:53 AM
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reply to post by Hemisphere
 





My friend, there is no honor among thieves. They eat their own.



amen, Hemi.




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