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The internet has (kind of) run out of space

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posted on Feb, 3 2011 @ 12:28 PM
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The internet has (kind of) run out of space


www.cnn.com

(CNN) -- On Thursday, the internet as we know it ran out of space.

The nonprofit group that assigns addresses to service providers announced that, on Thursday morning, it allocated the last free internet addresses available from the current pool used for most of the internet's history.

"This is an historic day in the history of the internet, and one we have been anticipating for quite some time," said Raul Echeberria, chairman of the Number Resource Organization.
(visit the link for the full news article)


edit on Thu Feb 3 2011 by DontTreadOnMe because: BAN title must match source article




posted on Feb, 3 2011 @ 12:28 PM
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The new pool, which has technically been ready since 1999, has so many IP addresses that most non-mathematicians probably don't even know the number exists -- 340 undecillion.

That's 340 trillion groups of one trillion networks each. Each network can handle a trillion devices. If the current pool were the size of a golf ball, the new one would be the size of the sun.


I've been working in IT for about 8 years and was intrigued during my education that domain names, in need, could run out eventually... of course, the resolution has been underway for years. Maybe this has to do with the new ipv6?...



www.cnn.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Feb, 3 2011 @ 12:34 PM
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IPv6 is the solution yes. So. to be clear the internet is not out of space. There are major companies that hand out that space. They have each been given the last share of "unallocated" space There is still a good 6 months, maybe a little more. But this gives companies time to prepare for Ipv6. Wouldn't worry too much about it.



posted on Feb, 3 2011 @ 12:38 PM
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reply to post by Juggernutty
 


watch out for net neutrality on this one. ipv6 has been ready for years but there was no profit in it. now that ipv4 addresses are in short supply, the cost of personal sites will skyrocket.

internet is a corporate phenom, like wireless, microwave, radio....everything the military made and then turned public.



posted on Feb, 3 2011 @ 12:46 PM
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reply to post by zroth
 


wrong ! Ipv6 is compatible with ipv4. Nothing different except the ip address is longer and more sophisticated



posted on Feb, 3 2011 @ 12:52 PM
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reply to post by Whereweheaded
 


Yeah, that's correct. So, prices should remain exactly the same. I think they said with Ipv6 each person in the world could have 1 million ip addresses to themselves and they wouldn't run out.



posted on Feb, 3 2011 @ 12:56 PM
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Originally posted by Whereweheaded
reply to post by zroth
 


wrong ! Ipv6 is compatible with ipv4. Nothing different except the ip address is longer and more sophisticated


what exactly was wrong with what I said? There is a cost to configuration changes, training, etc; there is no profit in unnecessary cost. ipv6 was ready to go in 1998. Dot com bust, y2k bust, corporations stopped investing in infrastructure refresh to save money and max returns to their shareholders.



posted on Feb, 3 2011 @ 01:01 PM
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Originally posted by zroth
reply to post by Juggernutty
 


watch out for net neutrality on this one. ipv6 has been ready for years but there was no profit in it. now that ipv4 addresses are in short supply, the cost of personal sites will skyrocket.

internet is a corporate phenom, like wireless, microwave, radio....everything the military made and then turned public.


And what makes you think there's profit in it now? The profit, if any, is in domain names, not ip addresses.There is even more supply than there was previously yet demand is unlikely to change, reletively speaking. So ipv4 is "obsolete", it's not nearly as much of a big deal as some would like to believe it is.
edit on 3-2-2011 by quackers because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 3 2011 @ 01:07 PM
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reply to post by zroth
 


IP v6 which you are correct to state is the newest version of the Internet protocol. Which will save us all from and Internetless world. It uses a 128-bit address rather than the IPv4 32 bit system. That means the massive amounts of addresses that will be made available. The only difference is that the IP addresses are not as subtle as the IPv4. IPv6 addresses look like this: 2001:0db8:85a:0000:0000:8a2e:0370:7334 as opposed the familiar IPv4 address that are far easier to recall, ex: 192.168.1.1.

IPv6 also handles routing and handles things differently. But in the end, its compatible with IPv4, and though it will be a big change, there wont be much of a financial loss, nor a massive cost to supply the IPv6 due to its compatibilities.



There is a cost to configuration changes, training, etc;



Nope see above: last paragraph, IPv6 and its compatibilities.

edit on 3-2-2011 by Whereweheaded because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 3 2011 @ 01:08 PM
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reply to post by CanadianDream420
 


Hmmm. Check this out:

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posted on Feb, 3 2011 @ 01:46 PM
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The one thing that's going to suck about IPv6 is memorizing an address. It was so easy with v4.



posted on Feb, 4 2011 @ 04:22 PM
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Originally posted by CanadianDream420


The new pool, which has technically been ready since 1999, has so many IP addresses that most non-mathematicians probably don't even know the number exists -- 340 undecillion.

That's 340 trillion groups of one trillion networks each. Each network can handle a trillion devices. If the current pool were the size of a golf ball, the new one would be the size of the sun.


I've been working in IT for about 8 years and was intrigued during my education that domain names, in need, could run out eventually... of course, the resolution has been underway for years. Maybe this has to do with the new ipv6?...



www.cnn.com
(visit the link for the full news article)


holy crap!!



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