It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Any Advice For Massive Food Allergy Sufferers?

page: 1
1

log in

join
share:

posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 08:17 PM
link   
I know that I really need to start preparing a lot more than I have, but when it comes to food storage, I'm really at a loss about how to proceed? I have a number of food allergies that are making it difficult for me to figure out what I should stock up on. On top of being all organic, vegetarian and gluten free, I'm allergic to peppers of all types, peppercorns, and last but not least: Iodine. Because of this, about 80-90 % of everything I consume is fresh foods. A few things stand out, of course: brown rice, beans/lentils, quinoa pasta, but I'm not certain what to do for vegetables. Canned soups/sauces are out, because they have salt or (worse) sea salt, not to mention it seems like wheat finds its way into just about everything lately...

Are there any other posters here with very demanding dietary concerns, and if so, how have you approached stocking up on food?

Advice would be so greatly appreciated!




posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 08:26 PM
link   

Millions of people suffer from food allergies and sensitivities, and this number is on the rise. For many people consuming the food results in an unpleasant reaction such as hives or gastrointestinal discomfort. However, a growing number of people are coping with allergies that can kill them. Some foods are relatively easy to avoid. If you're allergic to goat's milk, for example, avoidance means not drinking it or eating foods made with goat's milk. Other allergies are much harder to deal with. The most common allergies are to "The Big 8" (milk, egg, peanut, tree nuts, fish, shellfish, soy, and wheat.). Corn is also becoming a common allergen. People with these allergies must carefully scrutinize every label on everything they eat, every single time they eat it. They must grill waitstaff and call companies to verify ingredients. Often, they must become food chemists, because ingredients like wheat can be called by a variety of names. How do you cope? First, get as much information about your allergy as you possibly can. There's no such thing as too much information. Talk to your doctor and read reputable information in books and on the Internet. See if there's a foundation or community of people with this allergy - these are often excellent resources for label-reading and emotional support.


www.associatedcontent.com...


there is some information.
link provided, my personal
advice would be consult your
doctor, my dad did and they
ran tests , and determined alot
gave him a list of foods to avoid.



posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 08:28 PM
link   
Eh....

Stock up on epinephrine pens?



posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 08:31 PM
link   
reply to post by ProvehitoInAltum
 


Look into Auguson Farms, a part of the Blue Ribbon Group. They manufacture freeze dried and dehydrated foods in a fully gluten-free environment.

Augason Farms Website

I buy a great deal of product from them. Not just for long term storage, but I use a number of their products daily.



posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 08:33 PM
link   
reply to post by Jophiel
 


Thank you for the link, I will definitely check it out. I am already an obsessive label reader, it's amazing what you find in things. I was floored to read a number of blue cheese dressing labels that include wheat!



posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 08:35 PM
link   

Originally posted by kozmo
reply to post by ProvehitoInAltum
 


Look into Auguson Farms, a part of the Blue Ribbon Group. They manufacture freeze dried and dehydrated foods in a fully gluten-free environment.

Augason Farms Website

I buy a great deal of product from them. Not just for long term storage, but I use a number of their products daily.



Oh wow, thank you, that will definitely be a very useful link I'm thinking,. I was wondering if any of the suppliers offered any gluten free products. I could eat Udi's granola for breakfast, lunch and dinner every day (I love it to death), but unfortunately, we're only talking about a year of shelf life on products like that.



posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 11:01 PM
link   
reply to post by ProvehitoInAltum
 


You can vacuum package your granola, as well as other food products, and it extends the shelf life tremendously. I use a good model of Foodsaver, but there are other brands as well. You might also try dehydrating some foods yourself. I've had especially good luck drying apples in my home dehydrator.



posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 11:12 PM
link   

Originally posted by ProvehitoInAltum
about 80-90 % of everything I consume is fresh foods. A few things stand out, of course: brown rice, beans/lentils, quinoa pasta, but I'm not certain what to do for vegetables.


you can't possibly store enough canned/dried vegetables to last a major shtf senario, the only options are to start your own vege garden and/or research free edible weeds and wild foods in your area.



posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 11:23 PM
link   
My three year old is allergic to five of the top eight allergens. Besides fresh and frozen food, we stock up on quinoa, corn, oatmeal, rice and beans. We also buy pasta made with safe ingredients and flours she can eat (tapioca, buckwheat, amaranth, etc). If you are stocking up for hunkering down at home, I recommend those types of foods. More food ideas can come from autism cookbooks since alot of parents of autistic children tend to go allergy free. We picked one up and it's been a life saver and given us ideas for other meals.
But if you are stocking up because you have to flee, I recommend taking the dry goods. We would take rice, beans and oatmeal (rolled oats). For meat, fruits and vegetables, I recommend learning to hunt and gather wild foods. I live in the PNW, so there is a lot of food and water year round. I also picked up a local edible plant and herb guide that shows what the Native Americans consumed, and how they prepared and consumed it. For example, some tribes used cat-o-nine tails as flour for bread. Since you have so many allergies, you will probably have to use your best judgment and learn before hand which local plants are related to the plant family of your allergies.
Unless you're in an inhabitable wasteland, people have been surviving in your area for thousands of years, without refrigeration or grocery runs.



posted on Feb, 5 2011 @ 07:42 AM
link   
reply to post by ProvehitoInAltum
 


Have you considered whether your allergies may be caused by modern day foods and food processing?

I would forget packaged cereals and processed foods, and instead I would stock up on tools and equipment to culture/ferment/sprout food. E.g. kefir grains, mason jars, natural salt, sprouting jars, as well as foods in basic form: grains, nuts, seeds, dried beans. These should store well for a long time. Not as long as tinned food however. I guess it depends on how long it will take to respond to the survival situation and establish a reliable source of food.

Cultured foods (kefir, yoghurt) and fermented foods are pro-biotic, and essential for gut health. (I have discovered that poor gut health was the cause of my allergies, you might wish to investigate this and find out if it will work for you).

Sprouting foods also increases the bioavailability of vitamins in seeds and grains.



posted on Feb, 5 2011 @ 09:00 AM
link   

Originally posted by the2people

Originally posted by ProvehitoInAltum
about 80-90 % of everything I consume is fresh foods. A few things stand out, of course: brown rice, beans/lentils, quinoa pasta, but I'm not certain what to do for vegetables.


you can't possibly store enough canned/dried vegetables to last a major shtf senario, the only options are to start your own vege garden and/or research free edible weeds and wild foods in your area.


I'm sorry but I have to disagree entirely. I presently have enough freeze-dried and dehydrated foods to feed my family of 3 for over a year! I do, however, agree with you that a vegetable/fruit garden will be imperative for long-term survival. But with hat one must also be prepared to can/jar their harvest for over-wintering. The greatest challenge with relying ONLY on a garden is the fact that harvests tend to come in rapidly. Take tomatos for example, yes their harvest date is over a 6 week period, BUT, who can eat 350 tomatos in 6 weeks?

Also, let us not forget about accessory needs, such as sugar, salt, baking soda/powder etc... It is best to buy these in sealed #10 cans or buckets as well as you will need these to prepare meals. I have purchased many with the intent of using much of this for barter if necessary.



posted on Feb, 17 2011 @ 10:40 AM
link   
reply to post by ProvehitoInAltum
 


Or try to be one of the first ones to go...

Wow, those conditions really add a huge constraint to your survival ability. Depending on the scenario, food may be hard to find, let alone food that will work for you. You will definitely need to depend on your own foresight.



posted on Feb, 19 2011 @ 10:02 PM
link   

Originally posted by ProvehitoInAltum
but I'm not certain what to do for vegetables.

Are there any other posters here with very demanding dietary concerns, and if so, how have you approached stocking up on food?



I am also gluten intolerant (celiac/autoimmune), mostly vegetarian, and organic food eating.

For vegetables, I keep a garden and greenhouse, I store seeds (so I can always start another garden), and I keep a steady supply of sprouts in quart jars with stainless screen lids... mostly lentil and mung bean. I also keep a 6 month supply of Solaray Mega Multi Mineral and Source-of-life Multi Vitamins. I also seek to befriend folks at the local farmer's markets and I keep summer veggies frozen in the deep freeze or pickled over winter. I also seek to plant perennial fruits like apples and blueberries.

Like you, I buy and keep quantities of brown rice, various beans, oats, and quinoa. I purchase through a "buying club" at UNFI. I use cornelius kegs, wide mouth masons, and gallon glass jugs (from apple juice) to store bulk dry goods.



Hope that helps!

Sri Oracle
edit on 19-2-2011 by Sri Oracle because: (no reason given)

edit on 19-2-2011 by Sri Oracle because: (no reason given)



new topics

top topics



 
1

log in

join