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Long time Reader/First time poster - Coordinates at Google Earth reveal a UAV ?

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posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 07:53 PM
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Howdy.

I have been reading for a good while these various forums on ATS.

Anomalies on the Moon are my favorite subject.

I use Google Earth & Moon a lot,
and just a few days ago, I was surveying landscape
and an object in the aerial view caught my eye
and if you have loaded Google Earth
(and if you haven't you should.
it is so easy to do and use)
then go to the program
and when the Earth comes up,
copy and paste these coordinates:

35 34 44.51N 78 47 08.37W

into the upper left "Fly to" menu box
and then click.

You should be homed in to my discovery
which will be just to the left (West)
of the crossbeam coordinate box
which appears faintly on the screen
and then either use your mouse wheel
or the tool in the upper right of the screen
to Zoom In on the "flying object"
just to the left of the crossbeam targeting box . . .
and
in my view I think that "plane",
whose wings/tail/nose configurations
I have never seen on any aircraft,
just might be one of those next generation small/mini UAVs,
or Unmanned Aerial Vehicles, which rumors
are that the gummint is now using to surveil
(read: "SPY" on all of us) ...

I think that the satellite Google uses,
CAUGHT the whizzing plane heading west
in its camera lens and now
the Whole Google Earth-Viewing World
can see it.

Enjoy!... (or not).

Oh,
and the sun reflecting off the aircraft gives
a weird rainbow-halo effect,
that may indicate the materials
of which it is constructed,
or
the speed at which it is clipping along,
or maybe both.

Does anyone know how to measure it?

Tell what size it is?

One of you math or physics freaks out there...

I just can't get perspective and don't know how.

Could it be simply a model airplane?
(of course, THAT would be a UAV, too)




posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 08:01 PM
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Looks almost fake doesn't it?
Could this be RC airplane?



posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 08:04 PM
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Nice find. Very interesting shot you found there.

It looks a lot like a Cessna to me.
I think it's to large to be an RC plane.
edit on 2-2-2011 by HrdCorHillbilly because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 08:06 PM
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Could anyone do me a favor and grab a screen-shot of this?

I have been trying to get GE for months now, and it never seems to work... not sure if it's a computer issue or a user issue.

Would be much appreciated!



posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 08:06 PM
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It looks like an ordinary small plane but its size is 46ft x 35ft. There is actually a ruler there that you can use to measure anything you want to measure in Google Earth.



posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 08:11 PM
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Here ya go...





posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 08:12 PM
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reply to post by VeniVidi
 


Yeah, that last question I asked about a "model airplane",
and I really meant a remote controlled airplane like you suggest,
but I just can't find a way to get perspective
and tell how big it is,
but I have read that the newest of the UAVs are very small
and have better imaging equipment as well as
all kinds of sensors and that they are be "deployed"
in the civilian populations of the U.S.



posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 08:15 PM
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reply to post by HrdCorHillbilly
 


I went to a Google page for images of the Cessna:

www.google.com...

and could find no models that look like the one in the Google Earth image.

If you zoom in on it, the weird dip or U-shape in the tips of the wings
are strange and I've never seen anything like it,
but I am no aviation expert.
I wonder how that configuration would help the aerodynamics?



posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 08:18 PM
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reply to post by wavemaker
 


If you can do so without going to too much trouble-
can you simply explain how to use the "ruler/measuring" tool
on Google Earth?

I had no idea it was that big...



posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 08:28 PM
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I don't know what this could be...but it doesn't cast a shadow like the trees directly below it do.



posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 08:29 PM
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Originally posted by BoomBoomBoomBoom
reply to post by wavemaker
 


If you can do so without going to too much trouble-
can you simply explain how to use the "ruler/measuring" tool
on Google Earth?

I had no idea it was that big...

There are toolbars in the upper part of Google Earth. The rightmost toolbar is "View in Google Maps", followed by "Print" then "Email" and finally "Show Ruler".



posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 08:46 PM
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reply to post by makinit66
 


I guess it would depend on the sun angle,
but the shadows on the ground are not long,
so the time of day should be around noon,
and I guess that is when Google wants the satellite
to take images - at 12 'o clock High -
and
I went to Google Images again to check on "mini UAVs",
even though it's looking like it's a bigger craft
and the configurations of the craft are mind-blowingly diverse.

Check it out:
www.google.com...



posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 08:56 PM
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Looks like either an RC model plane or a home built ultra light. Without knowing the planes altitude it will be tough to determine its actual size. The ruler is calibrated to the Earth's surface.



posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 09:03 PM
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reply to post by wavemaker
 


Thanks so much.
I verified your measurements and they came out the same
playing with the zoom in and out tool.
Wow, isn't Google Earth just loaded with tools and surprises.
I had seen the "Ruler" tool, but had never taken the time to explore it,
but in just a few minutes, after entering "feet" in the box,
per your choice of measure,
in about a minute's time I'd figured it out.

Okay, since the craft is roughly 35 feet from tail to nosecone
and 45 feet from wingtip to wingtip, then the point about the SHADOW
it would cast by the other poster seems valid-
I looked all around on the ground, the open fields and even on the tree top foliage
and I could find no shadow cast by this craft,
and since it is that big and is no higher in the sky than it is,
shouldn't it cast a shadow??



posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 09:09 PM
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Originally posted by Bordon81
Looks like either an RC model plane or a home built ultra light.
Without knowing the planes altitude it will be tough to determine its actual size.
The ruler is calibrated to the Earth's surface.


Ohhhh, so that puts things back to Square One, then.
Well,
just looking at the cars below, which are about 15 feet in length,
could you guesstimate the craft's height /\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\ . . .
no, scratch that - that wouldn't work.

It seems there has to be some kind of Reference Point
to get the right perspective and I just don't know how to do that,
but my first impression, was that it is a small craft,
hence the "mini UAVs" I cited.

Do you "get" the configuration of it - the weird dip in the wingtips
and the slot in the tail and what looks like separation of the nose
or cockpit from the body of the craft?



posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 09:22 PM
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Originally posted by HrdCorHillbilly
Here ya go...




Thank you very much! I'd give ya a star but for some reason the feature isn't showing up right now.. not sure what that's about.

Anyway, the little cutout areas on the wing tips do indeed look strange. I'm no aerodynamics expert but it seems like it would mess with the airfoil shape. The only theory I have is that there are black stripes on the wings, and the resolution/shadows/distance just plays with your eyes and makes you think its a depression in the wing or a dip.

As far as the black area right behind the nose, I THINK that is the shadow cast by the wings. Judging by the tree's shadow it would be in the right direction. But don't most smaller planes have wings that are even with, or below, the top of the plane, and wouldn't cast a shadow over the cockpit/nose area?

The weird rainbow effect is what makes me the most curious, anyone with aviation experience know of any paint or coating that would play with the light like that?

Thanks again for the pick!

EDIT:

After digging around online for a minute I found this:

www.finishing.com...

Quote from said site:

"The SS coating could be too thin and multiple beam intereference could be causing causing rainbow effects. "

"These are PVC substrate with a UV cured paint primer, followed by a PVD application of Stainless steel (grade is 316L), finished up with another protective UV coating on top. The issue is in a rainbow effect that is hapenning over stainless as well as some curing issues with the topcoat..."

Maybe it's just an aircraft with a UV coating and black stripes on the wings?

I don't know, I'll see what else I can find.

edit on 2-2-2011 by James1982 because: New Info



posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 09:58 PM
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Anyway, the little cutout areas on the wing tips do indeed look strange. I'm no aerodynamics expert but it seems like it would mess with the airfoil shape. The only theory I have is that there are black stripes on the wings, and the resolution/shadows/distance just plays with your eyes and makes you think its a depression in the wing or a dip.

The weird rainbow effect is what makes me the most curious, anyone with aviation experience know of any paint or coating that would play with the light like that.

EDIT:

After digging around online for a minute I found this:
Quote from said site:
"The SS coating could be too thin and multiple beam intereference could be causing causing rainbow effects. "




When you are able to load and use Google Earth,
and you zoom in on the craft so large it fills your monitor screen,
you will see that there are no tricks of light and shadow.

There IS a bizarre 'U-shaped' configuration in the wingtips,
and I can't figure that out for anything.
You will be able to tell it is NOT black striping on the tips.


Maybe the weird rainbow effect has to do with - for lack of a better description -
something related to the shutter speed in the camera of the orbiting satellite.
Wouldn't a camera taking high altitude aerial shots
have a slow shutter speed to let in a lot of light to get good resolution
on the stationary ground features it is targeting?
You'd only have a fast shutter speed if you wanted to image fast-moving objects.
Right?
I am not a photographer, except a lay photographer.

So,
if the above speculation is true, then the aircraft is hauling buggy
and the "colored halo" effects are what happens on a fast moving target. (?)

But, to negate that thought - wouldn't there be a blurred aircraft affecting
the definition of it? ... or IS the rainbow halo effect THE BLURRING?

More Questions Than Answers





posted on Feb, 3 2011 @ 09:28 AM
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Here's the type of plane I was referring to.


This plane could explain why there is so much blur in the picture.
Maybe the plane shown in Google maps was shiny like this one.


I think your seeing the blank areas in the wings due to the decal/sticker on the wings.
A lot of planes have reflective vinyl decals on them.
edit on 3-2-2011 by HrdCorHillbilly because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 3 2011 @ 10:19 AM
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reply to post by HrdCorHillbilly
 


A poster in another forum offered this:

"Someone with photoshop could seperate the three images
then move them into register to clear up that image of the plane.
Everything else would be blurry,
but it might allow a positive ID on the plane if it were clear.
Even the individual frames should be clear although mono colored."

Do you know anyone with this Photoshop ability?



posted on Feb, 3 2011 @ 10:24 AM
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reply to post by BoomBoomBoomBoom
 


BoomBoomBoomBoom, welcome to ATS nice find. If its real it can be as simple as a Ufo shifted to match local area craft.. Unn no



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