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Time To Meat Reality!!

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posted on Feb, 3 2011 @ 12:43 AM
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reply to post by pikypiky
 


"...and then the white man will learn that you can't eat money" or however it goes.




posted on Feb, 3 2011 @ 01:00 AM
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reply to post by sonofliberty1776
 


I too have hunted and fished.

However, there's a world of difference between doing the killing yourself, and the meat industry. Walk down the meat aisle at your local store. The butcher, the seafood and the lunch meats.

Most of that is destined for a garbage can. The creatures that died to provide that life lived in terrible conditions that could not be forgiven except that all we see are the slabs of meat sliced off of them. And that cow that feeds ten people ate enough feed to keep a thousand people from hunger.

do-it-yourself meat is one thing. You invest in the creature, and it's in your own interest to make sure it lives healthily and dies cleanly. it's still killing, but when you do it yourself, that's taking responsibility for causing that death.

When you buy a side of ribs from the store, that's a disconnection. You know nothing about that animal except it's dead now. I was walking through the store and all of a sudden, noticed a twelve-pack of chicken drumsticks. That's six dead birds there. Can you imagine living on a subsistence farm, and killing six chickens for the evening meal? Or even three? I have trouble seeing how you would keep chickens around at that rate. The man who raises chickens conserves them, regards them as valuable to his life. The man who buys drumsticks at the store just sees a snack; might as well be a bag of doritos.

Meat is okay. The meat industry is barbaric and unpardonable on any moral standard.
edit on 3/2/2011 by TheWalkingFox because: (no reason given)

edit on 3/2/2011 by TheWalkingFox because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 3 2011 @ 01:11 AM
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reply to post by byteshertz
 


Thank you for having the guts to post this. I personally cannot bring myself to watch this video as I would become emotionally and physically ill. I am a vegan and avoid leather and use only vegan friendly products - but I am sure animal products slip into my consumerism that I am not aware of. I just try my hardest as I hate inflicting pain on anything. I realise this is not a pro-vegan thread but I am sure that if a lot more people saw this type of stuff then they might stop cracking ignorant and immature jokes at the expense of of these poor and voiceless suffering animals. I believe one day we will all be aware of what we have done in our lives and karma be served. Might cop a bashing for this but I am sorry but these "animal slaughter factories" have to be abolished if we are to be considered as part of the higher greater realm.

Peace



posted on Feb, 3 2011 @ 01:12 AM
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reply to post by agentblue
 


Thanks agent blue for showing me another side of the picture! While I stand by my statement that alot goes to waste, you have definitely helped me see the other side of the picture where scraps are being used in these products. The reason I stand by my statement on waste is simply because we have all seen how much meat we waste and while alot of the products used in makeup etc may be just scrap it creates a demand in itself for that scrap which will exist and kill an animal even if it is not needed.
Again thanks for opening my eyes a bit more to the big picture and helping me deny ignorance ;-)



posted on Feb, 3 2011 @ 01:16 AM
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Originally posted by TheWalkingFox

And that cow that feeds ten people ate enough feed to keep a thousand people from hunger.



Never thought of it from that point of view either, im getting served alot of 'deny ignorance' here - thought i had it sussed. Thanks mate!



posted on Feb, 3 2011 @ 01:19 AM
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reply to post by Australiana
 


I am opening my eyes to your point of view. While I still think we benefit alot from eating meat and using the other products - I now see that we waist alot of energy and resources especially growing crops used for feeding 1 animal that could have otherwise fed alot more people if we were not so set in our ways.

Thanks for the post ;-)



posted on Feb, 3 2011 @ 01:27 AM
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reply to post by TheWalkingFox
 


I totally agree! If I lived on a farm and killed my own meat I would not be a vegan. Meat does taste good and the smell of it I find to be delicious. In this day and age though, the way animals are farmed in horrid conditions and slaughtered I can never forgive. It makes me literally throw if I think too hard about it. This man friend of mine said he completed a painting job at an abotoir and has been a vegan ever since. He also mentioned how most of the people working there were mentally disturbed and would never trust his kids with these types of people. So not only are these animals are slaughtered inhumanely but they are at the hands of these mentals up to their point of death. Can you imagine what goes on there then??? Bring back the old days and ABOLISH ONCE AND FOR ALL these animal slaughter factories and return to good old fashioned farming PLEASE!



posted on Feb, 3 2011 @ 01:31 AM
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reply to post by Liquesence
 




What do you mean by "a clean death?"

I have seen videos of both animals and humans having their throats slit, and it is hardly a pleasant, human, acceptable, or clean experience. On the contrary, it is quite chilling and horrific, both visually and auditory.

As an aside, some slaughterhouses slit the throats of the animals en masse, so i do not see how that is different from a sacrifice.

Perhaps i just don't understand or am missing something.


It is a clean death.

We had a lamb with a major injury and slit its throat on the advice of another shepherd. The sudden blood loss causes shock and the brain to shutdown.

I had an artery severed when I was six years old and can personally attest to the fact that the shock and blood lost made the experience painless.... until the Doctors started in with the blasted penicillin shots in the rump.


I only survived because there was a nurse close by who slapped a tourniquet on my leg and rushed me to the hospital.



posted on Feb, 3 2011 @ 01:57 AM
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reply to post by byteshertz
 


Seriously, take a look at this picture (it's not gross or anything, I promise)



Every single one of them eats about a ton of grains over its life before it is sent to slaughter. I'll bet you could feed a hell of a lot of people with a ton of corn.
edit on 3/2/2011 by TheWalkingFox because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 3 2011 @ 02:00 AM
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reply to post by Australiana
 


Well, I wouldn't take a layman's psychological analysis as evidence. But think about it. Your job is to kill animals, often several hundred, strip them down to their base components, and send them out for people to turn into mcNuggets and ham sandwiches. Every day. Eight hours a day.

People go a little nuts just working the phones in a cubicle for eight hours a day. I can only imagine what could happen if it were my job to kill pigs for the same hours. You'd have to get a little strange, just as a coping mechanism.
edit on 3/2/2011 by TheWalkingFox because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 3 2011 @ 02:06 AM
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Yeah, it's a heartless job and it's no wonder those people go nuts because of the repetitive tasks for prolonged periods of time. I suspect those people do have a moral conscious of guilt that EATS AWAY at their souls.



posted on Feb, 3 2011 @ 04:27 AM
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reply to post by pikypiky
 

reply to post by TheWalkingFox
 


Yes I have thought about that and so true.



posted on Feb, 3 2011 @ 07:35 AM
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reply to post by TheWalkingFox
 





Every single one of them eats about a ton of grains over its life before it is sent to slaughter. I'll bet you could feed a hell of a lot of people with a ton of corn.


THAT is the biggest problem with CAFOs (Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations) or IFAP (Industrial Farm Animal Production)

The reason CAFOs can compete so successfully with traditional integrated farming methods is because grain is sold at way below its actual production costs. It is subsidized by the US tax payer. The hidden agenda is two fold. One the subsidizes go to the big corporate farms based on Acres not planted land this drives smaller farms out of business. Second the cheap grain allows factory farms to compete against pasture raised animals.

A Tufts University study, showed the overproduction of agricultural crops such as corn and soybeans due to the Freedom to Farm Act of 1996 has driven the market price of grains well below their cost of production (Starmer and Wise, 2007  ), resulting in a substantial discount to CAFOs facility operators for their feed.


Independent farmers are squeezed between the grain trading cartel, and the slaughter house cartel who set the prices they pay. With only one buyer farmers have no choice but to sell at the price the cartels set. Dan Amstutz 1996 Freedom to Farm Act caused lower commodity prices [that] have not translated into consumer benefits. Since 1984, the real price of a USDA market basket of food has increased 2.8 percent while the farm value of that food has fallen by 35.7 percent.

Dan Amstutz also wrote the World Trade Organization's Agreement on Agriculture while acting as a trade negotiator under Clinton. This Agreement allowed the cheap US grain caused by his Freedom to Farm Act to drive out independent farmers in third world countries by removing protective tariffs. He was VP of the top international grain trader Cargill and then worked for Goldman Sachs.

That is where things get really interesting. This is stolen from WANTtoKNOW. Info: Excerpts of Key Financial News Articles in Major Media

The first articles states:

Commodity Futures Trading Commission judge says colleague biased against complainants

..P.ainter said Judge Bruce Levine ... had a secret agreement with a former Republican chairwoman of the agency to stand in the way of investors filing complaints with the agency. "On Judge Levine's first week on the job, nearly twenty years ago, he came into my office and stated that he had promised Wendy Gramm, then Chairwoman of the Commission, that we would never rule in a complainant's favor," Painter wrote. "A review of his rulings will confirm that he fulfilled his vow....

Levine had never ruled in favor of an investor. Gramm [wife of former senator Phil Gramm (R-Tex.)], was head of the CFTC just before president Bill Clinton took office. She has been criticized by Democrats for helping firms such as Goldman Sachs and Enron gain influence over the commodity markets. After leaving the CFTC, she joined Enron's board.

Note: For lots more from reliable sources on government corruption, click here.


NOW we know WHY Goldman Sachs hired Dan Amstutz!



The second Article states:

How Goldman gambled on starvation

This is the story of how some of the richest people in the world – Goldman, Deutsche Bank, the traders at Merrill Lynch, and more – have caused the starvation of some of the poorest people in the world. At the end of 2006, food prices across the world started to rise, suddenly and stratospherically. Within a year, the price of wheat had shot up by 80 per cent, maize by 90 per cent, rice by 320 per cent. In a global jolt of hunger, 200 million people – mostly children – couldn't afford to get food any more, and sank into malnutrition or starvation. There were riots in more than 30 countries, and at least one government was violently overthrown. Then, in spring 2008, prices just as mysteriously fell back to their previous level. Jean Ziegler, the UN Special Rapporteur on the Right to Food, calls it "a silent mass murder", entirely due to "man-made actions." Through the 1990s, Goldman Sachs and others lobbied hard and the regulations [controlling agricultural futures contracts] were abolished. Suddenly, these contracts were turned into "derivatives" that could be bought and sold among traders who had nothing to do with agriculture. A market in "food speculation" was born. The speculators drove the price through the roof.

Note: For an abundance of reports from major media sources detailing the many complex and hidden strategies employed by financial corporations to keep their hyper-profits flowing in, click here.


This is not the only time we find the blasted bankers and financiers screwing around with our food supply. Nicole Johnson's scathing article follows the banker run Committee for Economic Development plans for the demise of American farming from its inception in 1942 until today.

The Pew Report not only documents the health and environmental risks from CAFOs but also points out the economic devastation to rural America.



...The “Green Revolution,” the worldwide transformation of agriculture that led to significant
increases in agricultural production from 1940 through the 1960s.
This transformation relied on a regime of genetic selection, irrigation, and chemical fertilizers pesticides developed by researchers such as Norman Borlaug and funded by a consortium of donors led by the Ford and Rockefeller foundations...The Green Revolution would later prove to have unwanted ecological impacts....

At the end of his second term, President Dwight Eisenhower warned the nation about the dangers of the military-industrial complex—an unhealthy alliance between the defense industry, the Pentagon, and their friends on Capitol Hill. Now, the agro-industrial complex—an alliance of agriculture commodity groups, scientists at academic institutions who are paid by the industry, and their friends on Capitol Hill—is a concern in animal food production in the 21st century...

CAFOs (Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations) or IFAP (Industrial Farm Animal Production) facilities... and their associated industrial slaughterhouses produce “cheap” meat, eggs, and dairy by externalizing their costs. The costs to the public from the ecological damage and health problems created by factory farms are not considered any more than the law requires, and companies have often found it less expensive to pay fines than to alter their methods. For this reason, the true cost of meat is never reflected in the price consumers pay....

The economic disparity between industrial farms and those that retain locally owned and controlled farms may be due in part, to the degree in which money stays in the community. Locally owned and controlled farms tend to buy their supplies and services locally, thus supporting a variety of local businesses. This phenomenon is known as the economic “multiplier” effect, estimated at approximately seven dollars per dollar earned by the locally owned farm. In contrast, ifap facilities under contract to integrators have a much lower multiplier effect because their purchases of feed, supplies, and services tend to leave the community, going to suppliers and service providers mandated by the integrators.


Unfortunately with the passage of the Food Safety Farce, American farmers will soon follow third world farmers into bankruptcy and suicide. Mexico lost 75% of her farmers, Portugal lost 60% and India's farmers committed suicide every 32 minutes between 1997 and 2005. Since 2002, that has become one suicide every 30 minutes....

Once the Cartel capture the food supply you can say good buy to our historically cheap food. When you see food prices skyrocket in the near future you will now know why.



posted on Feb, 3 2011 @ 01:43 PM
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That thread about the Jewish goat
made me realise that a lot of people either confuse their own squeamishness at the sight of blood with concern for animal welfare, or they simply refuse to think about what their food really is.


Industrial farming alienated us from our food. We just don't know its value any more. Someone who raised and killed an animal knows what that animal's life is worth. Someone who buys a package of boneless, skinless slice of meat doesn't even think about the fact that it was once part of a living creature.


I guess one of the reasons I became a vegetarian (apart from being horrified by the methods and impact of industrial farming) is that when I was a child my grandparents raised rabbits for a few years. I made friends with those guys, they were really cool, I helped taking care of them and all, and then I ate them. Eating something that was once my friend changed the way I look at meat forever.


Still, if I were to ever eat meat again, I would rather eat again something that was once a friend than one of those billions of anonymous tortured creatures that the meat industry treats like commodities.


On a side note: are battery hen cages still legal in the USA? They were banned in Europe, last year I think, I'm really grateful for that.



posted on Feb, 4 2011 @ 02:10 AM
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reply to post by byteshertz
 


Well now, I have to agree ... De-centralise the market and slaughter animals locally, that way we can enjoy fresher meat and pay an appropriate price for the animals life. To think there are people who believe buffalo have wings




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