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Anthropologists discover oldest graveyard in middle-east!

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posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 06:35 PM
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Anthropologists discover oldest graveyard in middle-east!


www.news.utoronto.ca

Anthropologists at the University of Toronto and the University of Cambridge have discovered the oldest cemetery in the Middle East at a site in northern Jordan. The cemetery includes graves containing human remains buried alongside those of a red fox, suggesting that the animal was possibly kept as a pet by humans long before dogs ever were.
(visit the link for the full news article)


Related News Links:
www.sciencedaily.com
scienceblog.com




posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 06:35 PM
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Previous research had identified the earliest cemeteries in the region in a somewhat later period (the Natufian, ca. 15,000-12,000 years ago). These were notable for instances of burials of humans with dogs.

This site has been dated at around 16,500 years old

Image of 'Uyun al-Hammam' Grave site:



I found this article interesting and hope you do too.
Dogs mans best friend? well at one time canines may of not been the only animal humanity attempted to have as pets in antiquity this article seems to suggest.
Although they seem to hint it may of not been fully accomplished?:


The researchers say that it could suggest that foxes were at one time treated in much the same way as dogs, in that there could have been early attempts to tame foxes, but no successful domestication. Studies have shown that foxes can be brought under human control but is not easily done given their skittish and timid nature, which may explain why dogs ultimately achieved “man’s best friend” status instead.


It seems no matter what the animal may of been,Humanity has seemed to have a place in it's heart for a pet,even thousands of years ago as well.
I personally would of never thought of a fox being domesticated
I would love to have a red fox as a pet! They are beautiful creatures.


Either way this is a great find imo


www.news.utoronto.ca
(visit the link for the full news article)
edit on 2-2-2011 by PerfectPerception because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 06:47 PM
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interesting post...

what baffles me about the burial is did the fox and the owner pass at the same time or was the fox euthanized so it may enter the grave with its master ? it would seem more likely to me there is the possibility this burial represented that of a fox hunter... As we have observed from other archeological sites especially in the middle east and Africa this was a common practice. Even in other areas of ancient burials people seem to be buried with their craft/trade. I did not read the full article yet but were there any weapons buried in the same grave ? (foxhunting is a very popular and large sport) Oh I hear turtles make a good soup too but I am not sure because I never tried it.

Dogs are humans best friend however in my opinion



posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 06:53 PM
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reply to post by Cosmic.Artifact
 


Very good point and observation!

At the end of the article it does admit that the human-fox pet theory is one among several theories and they make reference to what you have previously stated about hunter/gatherers,the relationship between hunter & prey.

So I suppose either outcome is plausible.
Unfortunately the deceased are no longer with us to answer such inquires!



posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 06:56 PM
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I have seen a much longer and more informative video about domesticating foxes before, but I can't find it right now...

this video however will give you the general idea of how long and hard it is to domesticate a fox, this experiment began in 1959 and is still ongoing. I wish I could find the full documentary on this subject because it is much clearer in its implications and cover-ups.
some of the methods I seen on the movie I watched I did not agree with...



posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 06:59 PM
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buried at the Jordan site were found with what are known as "grave goods," such as stone tools, a bone spoon, animal parts, and red ochre (an iron mineral). One grave contained the skull and right upper arm bone of a red fox, with red ochre adhered to the skull, along with bones of deer, gazelle and wild cattle.
www.news.utoronto.ca...

I wonder if the fox hunters of today actually eat the fox ? or are they just a trophy...



posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 07:03 PM
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reply to post by Cosmic.Artifact
 


Good points & questions.
I would imagine that a fox pelt would of been highly sought and desired back then even as it is today?



posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 07:05 PM
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reply to post by Cosmic.Artifact
 


I will have to check out the video you have posted.
Thank you for your information and input.I was not aware at all up until now of that experiment and the attempts of domesticating foxes.



posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 07:11 PM
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reply to post by PerfectPerception
 


the ochre of course is symbolic... I am looking into its meaning now and how it was used in different time periods and cultures.

I am not saying totally that a fox was not mans best friend at one time, I am just saying really that extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence.

don't mind me man... it's an ATS thing ya know



posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 07:28 PM
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on the fox vid. it's implications are potentially off the charts. what if those genetic effects also apply to humans? then the old way of thinking our differences are social, upbringing, financial, etc.., will have to be thrown out the window. even when they gave those babies to friendly moms they turned out nuts, the genes didn't lie.



posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 07:32 PM
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reply to post by Cosmic.Artifact
 



I wonder if the fox hunters of today actually eat the fox ? or are they just a trophy...


No, they don't eat fox..
They are killed as vermin and for their fur..
We had a Skin wholesaler next door to my factory and I asked them that question..
Apparently not very nice to eat...



posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 08:32 PM
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reply to post by backinblack
 

that's terrible man... I am so totally against hunting for sport or profit I could not use words to express it !

you should come up with some well thought out way within the boundaries of law and using psyop tactics to get that skin wholesaler to drop his ways.

I would've...



posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 09:09 PM
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reply to post by backinblack
 

That's awful
I'm no fan of sport/trophy hunting, the animal dies in vain....for a human being vain
The same feelings apply to catch & release sport fishing for me. When I fish, I fish for my DINNER, not to throw it back, unless the catch is too small/out of season/juvenile. if I accidentally hook something I shouldn't, they go free as quickly as possible. If you're going to hunt something, you better be making a meal out of it, not killing it for it's skins, or for the hell of it



With regards to the original post, this is a fascinating find! S & F!



posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 09:40 PM
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Greatness, thank you for sharing this update looks like I have another site to add to the countless list of places I need to see. It will be interesting to see what else they find as they dig deeper into the site.



posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 10:25 PM
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reply to post by Cosmic.Artifact
 


No problem. I agree wholeheartedly that we are without the proper evidence to prove the "pet" theory.
I too dislike killing for sport.Just not my thing.




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