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What is your level of education?

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posted on Feb, 22 2011 @ 01:22 AM
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I left school when I was 16 and never went back




posted on Feb, 24 2011 @ 05:20 AM
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Originally posted by charles1952
Me? I'm ignorant and stupid.


No one is ignorant and stupid!
edit on 24-2-2011 by outerlimits because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 24 2011 @ 05:38 AM
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well I completed primery school and then left. I wasn't learning anything.


I was in the remedial (stupid) classes constantly yet I was the smartest kid in class, I just had holes in my knowledge (reading age of 16, spelling age of 6.)

They don't challegnge kids in the right way, especial those they think are slow. Just because I couldn't spell or do maths didn't mean I was thick it just ment I was being taught badly.



posted on Feb, 25 2011 @ 08:57 AM
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I went to college to learn great things.

I quickly realized the system of buffoonery was not designed to promote true academia.

I found out that it was a scam for $$$.

I discovered that the Library was Free $, and I could go learn anything I wanted anytime I wanted.

Thus I have a PhD in Spotting Con Artistry.



posted on Feb, 25 2011 @ 09:07 AM
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kicked out of university end of year 1

no application



posted on Feb, 25 2011 @ 09:20 AM
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Associates degree in specialized computer technology
Carpenter & Masonry trained in high school received certificate for completing courses with diploma at graduation.

edit on 2/25/11 by Ophiuchus 13 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 25 2011 @ 09:23 AM
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reply to post by Haydn_17
 


Good for you!


For whatever its worth, I have quite a bit myself. Not to sound blasé but education is only as good as what we make of it
Imho, too much education can sometimes be as dangerous as too little.

My undergrad honours degree was a joint major in Psychology and Sociology.
My masters focused on cognitive psychology. I’m toying with the idea of going back for by Phd --- but I don’t think so

Unrelated to that, I have my ARCT levels (university equivalent) in both Piano Performance and Music Instruction.

The music degrees, I wouldn’t change for the world. Looking back though, I’m unsure regarding my work in Psychology and Sociology. I enjoyed the courses and had great profs --- however many of the courses seems overly based in materialism. There’s so much we don’t know, yet rather than explore the unknown, it seems like they deliberately ignore it in favour of repeating the same silly redundant experiments.

Perhaps I’m wrong. And perhaps it’s up to a new generation to explore further --- but it seems like the system is set up to encourage the same old derivative experiments rather than growth. This is just my humble opinion though.

I know there are more exciting experiments taking place elsewhere --- and I think that’s great. It’s just the more metaphysical branches of psychology and consciousness studies (which I find so much more fascinating than some of the generic studies out there) receives little press or funding. Hopefully that will change with more awareness and time.



posted on Mar, 2 2011 @ 01:42 AM
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Graduated high school last June. Attending college currently. Major is criminal justice



posted on Jan, 17 2012 @ 05:00 PM
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Not sure how I came across this thread.

Answering this topic, without reading any replies. Will go back, afterward, and see what it really turned into.



Mathematician & Scientist by Education:
- Bachelors in Mathematics from the University of Texas, @ Austin - ["Hookem" m/.]
- Graduate with Honors from The Science Academy of Austin, @ L.B.J.** ["Sic'em!"]

Technician, Engineer, Project Manager, Technical Trainer by Profession:
- Immediately, after graduation, jumped in the Manufacturing Technologist Program at a local Fortune 500 Company, where I worked for over 13 years, serving a variety of roles.

Cosmologist & Historian [& Card Player] by Passion.
- These are my favorite topics, that I wish I had gotten an earlier jump on. As with everything, the more you learn the more you realize you don't know. And, the more you want to know. But, there is so much to catch up on, and, I had a later jump on these.
(And these can be extremely thought-provoking, absolutely fascinating/revealing, profitable (not, necessarily applying to each, respectively, but to all, equally))


Yet, I'm the one who's 'out there', right?



edit to add: know what you're thinkin' - Nerd, right? Sorry, I'm a multisport athlete that does alright with the ladies. [Suck it, nerds and jocks, I'm both of you!] Musician: percussionist/drummer, pianist (self taught), World Traveler, and have had a job ever since I was 15 (from roller skating sandwich board ad-wearer, to dishwasher, to bus boy, to video store worker, to pizza maker, to maintenance kid, to electrician, to graphics technician, to everything else, above (this all pre-graduate, naturally))- pretty "well-rounded" I think they call it






**College level courses taught on HS campus: Math [thru Eng. and Bus. Calculus, plus Diff Eq + something else, I forget], Computer Sciences, Physics, Chemistry [organic and inorganic], Biology, Astronomy, plus the advanced sciences, or 'electives' [inc. Circuitry - building circuit boards (all components of), this is back in '87-'88
edit on 1/17/2012 by SquirrelNutz because: note, and footnote



posted on Jan, 17 2012 @ 05:02 PM
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Best, so far...



Originally posted by LiveForever8
I got my Ph.D.'s in Astrophysics, Applied mathematics, Theoretical physics and Cosmology at Oxford in 2046. It was at this point I started work on my "project"...






Originally posted by BAZ752
reply to post by backinblack
 

[in response to, "Don't need a degree to be intelligent"]

I'd agree with that completely. Some of the best colleagues I've worked with, under, or even employed have been far more astute in the 'University of Life'' as it were. Certificates only really afford you greater responsibility and therefore accountability in certain roles and only demonstrates a person's aptitude to learn a given subject.

''Intelligence'' is far more deeper and complex animal.






Originally posted by unityemissions
Just another dropout that hangs out with other TAG dropouts, schools PHD's at the local pub, and laughs at most of the university fools who can't think on their own, but actually believe they're getting a solid education for their $$$/efforts invested.




All good. All accurate.
edit on 1/17/2012 by SquirrelNutz because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 17 2012 @ 05:10 PM
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Masters Degree in Social Work

Raising two decent kids gave me an education you can't earn with a degree.



posted on Jan, 21 2012 @ 04:23 PM
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reply to post by Haydn_17
 


I have a GED.



posted on Jan, 21 2012 @ 04:25 PM
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Originally posted by Haydn_17

Level 1 Certificate IT Users (Enhanced)
Level 2 Diploma IT Users (Enhanced)
Level 3 Advanced Diploma IT Users
Level 2 Diploma Business Studies
Level 2 Diploma Business Administration
Level 3 Diploma Project Management
Level 1 Certificate Higher Maths
Level 1 Certificate Higher English
Science Grade C
Religious Studies Grade B
Media Studies Grade C


Not even sure what these are..... but anyhow

BS in Psychology

3 AA degrees

FAA CFI, Flight Engineer, A&P

Tons of UAV certs.
edit on 21-1-2012 by Xtrozero because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 21 2012 @ 04:29 PM
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Originally posted by monkofmimir
well I completed primery school and then left. I wasn't learning anything.


I was in the remedial (stupid) classes constantly yet I was the smartest kid in class, I just had holes in my knowledge (reading age of 16, spelling age of 6.)

They don't challegnge kids in the right way, especial those they think are slow. Just because I couldn't spell or do maths didn't mean I was thick it just ment I was being taught badly.


Challenge begins at home. Both of my kids learned to read by age 3 and spell well by age 5 with up to 3rd grad math by first grade. School is geared for the lowest common denominator, but they do have accelerated classes.



posted on Jan, 21 2012 @ 04:31 PM
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-Bachelor's degree in nursing (BSN)
-Applied Associates degree in science (AAS)-Nursing
-New York State Paramedic certification
-Board Certified: Critical Care

-Instructor Certification:
CPR
ACLS (Advanced Cardiac Life Support)



posted on Jan, 21 2012 @ 04:32 PM
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GCSE

maths C
english lit B
english lang C
double science BB
business studies C
french D
graphic design E
art A

GNVQ
leisure and tourism Merit

im also trained to use numerous equipment and vehicles in warehouse and construction industries

i was pretty smart in school but due to unforseen reasons i had to leave school at 17 and get a job......
still pretty knowlagable in most areas just dont have the certificates or the money to get the certificates
edit on 21/1/2012 by DaveNorris because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 21 2012 @ 05:16 PM
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Originally posted by matthewm
I left school when I was 16 and never went back


I'm curious to know how that has affected your life, if at all? In today's economy there is no guarantee that an education will promise a person a comfortable and healthy life.Would you do anything different?



posted on Jan, 21 2012 @ 05:18 PM
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Originally posted by monkofmimir
well I completed primery school and then left. I wasn't learning anything.


I was in the remedial (stupid) classes constantly yet I was the smartest kid in class, I just had holes in my knowledge (reading age of 16, spelling age of 6.)

They don't challegnge kids in the right way, especial those they think are slow. Just because I couldn't spell or do maths didn't mean I was thick it just ment I was being taught badly.


I know a few people who were never officially diagnosed with learning disabilities, yet, instead, labeled lazy. I think being labeled "lazy" was far more damaging than being mis-diagnosed.



posted on Jan, 21 2012 @ 05:46 PM
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reply to post by Anttyk47
 


Me too, guess we don't count.
Sucks to be us but, I can spell better than most of the college schills so DEBUNK that bwa hahahha !



posted on Jan, 21 2012 @ 05:57 PM
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I think it has been said several times already...but I don't put a lot of thought into how educated someone is or not...and that is only because one of the most brilliant people I know dropped out of hight school and never went back...my dad!

He made sure I went to college...got a degree...only because the world seemed to require me to!

Later on in life...I went back for a second degree...and now I am working on a third!

So being educated in a certain field is important...and does help the way you view the world and the people in it...but I don't think it puts a person above or below another.

AS in Sociology.

AA in Social Science.

BA in progress...Social Science too!

EASA certified high voltage electrician (up to 24,000 volts)

Lots of certificates in all kinds of silly things...helps boost up the resume!




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