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Coping: You Ain’t Gonna Like This, but…

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posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 12:37 PM
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The following is a letter sent to George Ure at Urban Survival.com. I found this gentlemans theory interesting, but there are many here at ATS who have a much better grasp on this topic than I do. So I present it here for your perusal.


Hi George, your not going to like my working hypothesis, but I bet it’s right. I am sure you have read the information about the electro magnetic anomaly that is developing off the coast of Florida. There’s one in the Gulf of Aden too. There’s a reason for that. That’s because electro magnetic poles always come in two’s. One North and one South, but now we are looking at an East and a West pole as well…. Under my working hypothesis that’s not good. To explain allow me to switch to a weather map.





Ok, so you have two high’s separated by a low. Now, the one thing these want to do is come together and as they do the surrounding lines get wound tighter and tighter around the two highs. When this happens you get high wind speeds…turbulence. Now imagine you have two electro magnetic poles and now the lines we spoke about are lines of electro magnetism. As pressures from the build up of electro magnetism animals (including humans) are going to be adversely affected. The greatest amount of force will be in a straight line from Florida to roughly Minnesota. Any life form along that route MIGHT be adversely affected. These lines will still be felt hundreds of miles away but to a lessening amount. In addition to carbon based life forms having problems you can expect anything that uses electricity to also have problems. AC, DC, I don’t think it will matter. But wait there’s more! These lines will also be passing through the Earth’s crust and acting upon the plates and it’s fractures…like the New Madrid fault. This will probably go a long ways to explaining Clif’s latest HPH report. As I say, this is a working hypothesis and may not happen…but then it seems like it just might. Oh by the way, same thing is going on in the Gulf of Aden too, so that area should end up having much the same problems as Cliff has described. Oh wait…it is, my bad.


Any thoughts from those in the know? Possible? Or not?
edit on 2-2-2011 by Klassified because: (no reason given)

edit on 2-2-2011 by Klassified because: (no reason given)




posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 12:43 PM
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It sounds possible,

Everything is connected, and we know not enough about magnetism and gravity to explain there influence.

It could explain the "supers storms" as the new magnetic poles can influence the weather. As (evaporated)water is influenced by magnetics more then most people think.

It would be one of the first signs, as weather is faster influenced as earth.

But first would be compass, and radio interference.

edit on 2-2-2011 by EartOccupant because: (no reason given)

edit on 2-2-2011 by EartOccupant because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 12:55 PM
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reply to post by EartOccupant
 

George Ure sounded a bit iffy on it. But he didn't completely toss it out. Where's Redneck when you need him?



posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 12:56 PM
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reply to post by Klassified
 


Sorry I am interested but I don't understand fully, if anyone would like to explain I will appreciate it greatly!



posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 04:12 PM
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I would be very interested in hearing opinions on this theory from folks who know a bit more about the subject. What would the likely effects be of the Earth developing an East and West pole? If that is what the guy is saying is happening, which it seems to be. Even if it isn't actually happening, it would be interesting to look at the idea from a hypothetical viewpoint. Could such a thing even be possible, and if it were possible, what kind of effects could it have?

peace
J



posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 04:34 PM
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reply to post by skjalddis
 


imo if i was in the near location of a 'new magnetic pole' i suppose an easy test would be to go outside on a starry night and look for the streaming particle effect like the aura borealis at the magnetic north.
f



posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 04:59 PM
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reply to post by fakedirt
 


Aye, seems like a good idea but (thankfully?) I'm not in one of those regions - I can't imagine that it would be a good place to be - seems likely that there would be turmoil of one kind or another.

peace
J


edit - would really like to see some input from Geologists, Physicists, Meteorologists? Must be some of you guys here somewhere



edit on 2-2-2011 by skjalddis because: added stuff



posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 07:28 PM
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Sorry I'm missing in action on this thread, but my internet has been down for hours due to weather they're saying. I only have enough time to make this quick post on someone elses computer. I'll be back as soon as they get me back up and running.



posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 07:48 PM
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In order to create "east" and "west" poles (which, by the way, is more of a convenient naming rather than a scientific one), the dynamics at the core would have to be rather interesting. The rough dipole of the earth is created by the inner iron core rotating relative to the outer core, so, in order to create a quadrupole (2 north poles and 2 south poles), the inner core would have to create perpendicular magnetic fields. To do this, it would have to flow both east-west and north-south, which, I must say, is a physical impossibility.
The more likely explanation is that these are fluctuations in the dipole magnetic field and could represent local weak spots in that field. This has nothing to do with the earth gaining 2 new poles, though...it simply indicates that the earth is going through a natural period of field weakening. (And, yes, it could be a precursor to a magnetic pole reversal, but that's for another thread.)
edit on 2-2-2011 by CLPrime because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 07:56 PM
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reply to post by Klassified
 


i hate to ask the simple question, perhaps look foolish, but maybe look more so if i don't ask it...

why exactly do/would/could converging magnetic poles/anomolies have 'adverse effects' on life?



posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 09:44 PM
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well all i know is when the isobars are close togather its very windy. dont forget we probly are going to go through a polershift. does any1 know where the new northpole is said to be located? if its over the US than maybe thats why we are having some crazy weather. wouldnt that suck!!!

i have no clue how magnetic energys play a role on weather so maybe my logic could be an easy way of thinking?



posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 10:13 PM
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reply to post by indigothefish
 

Weather changes, volcanic activity, earthquakes, etc. Stuff we're seeing now. But also, if memory serves, most, if not all living creatures, have minute amounts of magnetite in their system. Including humans. I believe the theory is that animals especially use this to orient themselves to the geomagnetic field. Humans use it as more of a sensing system on a much smaller scale. But someone who knows more may want to correct me on that. But that's my understanding at the moment until I do some reading on it.

edit on 2-2-2011 by Klassified because: Add



posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 10:30 PM
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reply to post by CLPrime
 

Thanks for throwing your thoughts in the mix. That makes more sense than a quadrupole, if that's what the guy was trying to say.



posted on Feb, 3 2011 @ 04:51 AM
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reply to post by indigothefish
 

maybe the links supplied can be considered a factor in the mechanism and possible effects on the living environment.

www.astronomycafe.net...&sa=U&ei=woZKTeTrEJG1hAfor5jvDg&ved=0CCsQFjAJ&usg=AFQjCNH1ujDeZj5muE-rrZ7g0_4ZWq5YjA

www.savethewhales.org...&sa=U&ei=JIhKTcT3DoqIhQfYy7iIDw&ved=0CBoQFjAC&usg=AFQjCNGPL05KOc7Mcsk_LYo9f3besODjiQ

regards f.



posted on Feb, 3 2011 @ 04:54 AM
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Originally posted by SpunGCake
well all i know is when the isobars are close togather its very windy. dont forget we probly are going to go through a polershift. does any1 know where the new northpole is said to be located? if its over the US than maybe thats why we are having some crazy weather. wouldnt that suck!!!

i have no clue how magnetic energys play a role on weather so maybe my logic could be an easy way of thinking?


Last I heard the North Pole was heading for Siberia, so I don't think you need to worry about that one.


And thanks to CLPrime for throwing some light on this.


peace
J



posted on Feb, 3 2011 @ 04:57 AM
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Is Michigan far enough away to be relatively unaffected?

I hope



posted on Feb, 3 2011 @ 05:00 AM
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reply to post by SpunGCake
 

this link may shed some light on the subject


news.nationalgeographic.com...&sa=U&ei=BopKTc3gK4mLhQfL5cXSDg&ved=0CCcQFjAJOFA&usg= AFQjCNElWaj3y8WMqijqIuzSfv6G-reztg

regards f.



posted on Feb, 3 2011 @ 10:35 AM
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Originally posted by fakedirt
reply to post by SpunGCake
 

this link may shed some light on the subject


news.nationalgeographic.com...&sa=U&ei=BopKTc3gK4mLhQfL5cXSDg&ved=0CCcQFjAJOFA&usg= AFQjCNElWaj3y8WMqijqIuzSfv6G-reztg

regards f.


Thanks for this link. Most informative. Below are some quotes I found interesting from it:


The magnetic north pole had moved little from the time scientists first located it in 1831. Then in 1904, the pole began shifting northeastward at a steady pace of about 9 miles (15 kilometers) a year. In 1989 it sped up again, and in 2007 scientists confirmed that the pole is now galloping toward Siberia at 34 to 37 miles (55 to 60 kilometers) a year.



Geologists think Earth has a magnetic field because the core is made up of a solid iron center surrounded by rapidly spinning liquid metal. This creates a "dynamo" that drives our magnetic field.



Also, nobody knows when another change in the core might pop up elsewhere, sending magnetic north wandering in a new direction.


Seems like the author of the letter has done his homework, and what he says could be possible. Maybe. But it's still just as, or actually more theoretical than what we think the core of the earth is made of.



posted on Feb, 3 2011 @ 12:09 PM
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reply to post by Klassified
 

i also wouldn't rule out an interaction with the lhc or other related heavy field magnet set-ups. i did initially rule out a direct connection as cern is situated approx 9 degrees longitude and it seems as the crow flies the magnetic north is heading in the general direction of 90 degrees longitude from a north pole perspective. i am wondering as to any other installations along this predictive/actual path that could in theory attract the pole.
regards f



posted on Feb, 3 2011 @ 01:14 PM
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reply to post by Klassified
 


While the Dynamo Model is certainly a theory, it is by far the most accurate theory we have. And, in a testament to the power of the theory, a recent supercomputer simulation of the Dynamo effect actually spontaneously generated a geomagnetic pole shift, just as the earth does. This wasn't even the intention of the simulation, it just happened...

www.psc.edu...

So, the likelihood of the Dynamo Model being correct is greater than ever. This also means that the possibility of the earth forming a quadrupole magnetic field is ridiculously low, because this has very little chance of happening in the Dynamo Model. There are natural variations and fluctuations (obviously), which can approach a quadrupole, but for "west" and "east" poles to form is a bit of a stretch.
Okay, it's a lot of a stretch.
edit on 3-2-2011 by CLPrime because: (no reason given)



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