What one motivated Gurkha and his Kukri knife can do.

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posted on Feb, 3 2011 @ 10:23 AM
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Originally posted by Sounds_of_Silence
I remember the gurkah in Afghanistan who decapitated a taliban fighter and got told off for it, they do it culturally to send a warning, nothing else. There lucky he didn't start skinning it, ha!


It was NOT a warning. He beheaded the corpse because the victim could not be ID'ed as to weather he was a high value target or not and rather than extract the whole of the body, the head was removed instead to be brought back to the FOB so the identification could be carried out there.




posted on Feb, 3 2011 @ 10:29 AM
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Originally posted by Haydn_17
2nd Best Infantry in the British Empire, apart from the grenadiers that is


Really? And that is on both counts.



posted on Feb, 3 2011 @ 10:51 AM
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Originally posted by Qwenn

Originally posted by thoughtsfull
reply to post by SNAFU38
 


My honour came after the Brighton Bombing, when they where posted at that base I was working out of. Many great stories, and some really funny ones
I have to admit I am in complete awe of them... and the Kukri..


The real difference between the soldiers at Preston Barracks and the Gurkas who stayed there, was that on the whole, the soldiers were like spoiled little children who were only interested in the women stationed there ( who were mainly interested in each other ) and drinking, the Gurkas were polite and carried themselves with respect and showed respect for others. In all of the years that I served there, I only met a couple of decent ones. Heck, having to patrol the perimiter with an empty firearm and only having one bullet at the gatehouse, which had to be signed out and verified ( but only if it was needed ) was a piss poor arrangement, well, at least they could have defended the camp with their Kuri's.

If we had been in a conflict situation at the time, I know who I would have wanted on my side !


These ambassadors of virtue are not the ones that used to spend their Aldershot evenings, from monday to friday, ogling the strippers at 'The Rose & Crown'. More strippers on sundays at the 'The White Hart' and the main event being on the saturday, with a quick trip to London where they would splash their cash on prostitutes.

It couldnt be the same people as those that killed a local Belizian man and hospitalised some SAS troops at the Raul's Rose Garden brothel.

Each to their own but don't make them out to be saints.



posted on Feb, 3 2011 @ 10:53 AM
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The Kukri is part of the Gurkha's Soul as much as the Katana is of the Samurai! The are equally as skilled with their edged weapons of choice. Given the choice I would not wish to face either!

Zindo



posted on Feb, 3 2011 @ 11:31 AM
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Originally posted by hp1229

Originally posted by thoughtsfull
Brilliant, thanks for posting... I've proudly worked alongside a troop of Gurkhas, simply utterly brilliant people, and I honestly wouldn't expect anything less of them
nor expect anything less of a well used Kukri.

thanks for the linky
cheered my day up

edit on 2/2/11 by thoughtsfull because: (no reason given)

They are one of the Warrior Cast just like several others in India like the Rajputs or Kshatriyas. There are many others in India since the ancient times. The Cast system is what promoted such clans to exist such as Goldsmith, Cobbler, Warrior etc etc. Defence and Offense is built into their culture and passed down through generations. Most of them are very very loyal and brave.
GURKHA
KSHTRIYA

There are many such casts that are often selected by the Indian Army for their requirements for fighting in different terrains. Despite the advancement in modern warfare, some of them still prefer to retain the ancient tactics of defensive/offensive mechanisms and tools. They are good the way they are (which is to possess the heart and spirit of a warrior). I'm sure if given proper training and education with respect to modern technology by the Western Standards, they can be very effective in defense and offense.
edit on 3-2-2011 by hp1229 because: Fix the Links.
edit on 3-2-2011 by hp1229 because: Stupid Typos


Very interesting, thanks.. my home town was used as a hospital town for Indian troops during WW1 (some 10,000 Indian wounded) while the Royal Palace was used as a hospital, it was felt the Indian Architecture would make them feel at home.. I know some where Gurkhas, and during one visit to the Hospital King George V presented a Victoria Cross to an Indian Jemadar, Mir Dast for conspicuous gallantry

Perhaps the strangest Hospital of WW1

The fallen passed through the flames in a spot overlooking the town, where a memorial now stands.

So perhaps I should dig a little deeper, thanks for the info

edit on 3/2/11 by thoughtsfull because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 3 2011 @ 12:30 PM
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More info with a link to the Gurkha's Story.

More on GURKHA



posted on Feb, 3 2011 @ 12:32 PM
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Originally posted by thoughtsfull

Originally posted by hp1229

Originally posted by thoughtsfull
Brilliant, thanks for posting... I've proudly worked alongside a troop of Gurkhas, simply utterly brilliant people, and I honestly wouldn't expect anything less of them
nor expect anything less of a well used Kukri.

thanks for the linky
cheered my day up

edit on 2/2/11 by thoughtsfull because: (no reason given)

They are one of the Warrior Cast just like several others in India like the Rajputs or Kshatriyas. There are many others in India since the ancient times. The Cast system is what promoted such clans to exist such as Goldsmith, Cobbler, Warrior etc etc. Defence and Offense is built into their culture and passed down through generations. Most of them are very very loyal and brave.
GURKHA
KSHTRIYA

There are many such casts that are often selected by the Indian Army for their requirements for fighting in different terrains. Despite the advancement in modern warfare, some of them still prefer to retain the ancient tactics of defensive/offensive mechanisms and tools. They are good the way they are (which is to possess the heart and spirit of a warrior). I'm sure if given proper training and education with respect to modern technology by the Western Standards, they can be very effective in defense and offense.
edit on 3-2-2011 by hp1229 because: Fix the Links.
edit on 3-2-2011 by hp1229 because: Stupid Typos


Very interesting, thanks.. my home town was used as a hospital town for Indian troops during WW1 (some 10,000 Indian wounded) while the Royal Palace was used as a hospital, it was felt the Indian Architecture would make them feel at home.. I know some where Gurkhas, and during one visit to the Hospital King George V presented a Victoria Cross to an Indian Jemadar, Mir Dast for conspicuous gallantry

Perhaps the strangest Hospital of WW1

The fallen passed through the flames in a spot overlooking the town, where a memorial now stands.

So perhaps I should dig a little deeper, thanks for the info

edit on 3/2/11 by thoughtsfull because: (no reason given)


No problems. I still wonder how many of them were really honoured (atleast the ones that fought with British and US in the trenches against the Germans).



posted on Feb, 3 2011 @ 01:52 PM
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reply to post by thoughtsfull
 


You got it!



posted on Feb, 3 2011 @ 02:11 PM
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There is no excuse for carrying a knife. Anyone who does so is obviously up to no good.


This many should be jailed for his actions, minimum 10 years.


*British mode off*
edit on 3-2-2011 by TheDarkTurnip because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 3 2011 @ 02:56 PM
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Their first mistake was only trying to attack one Gurkha with 40 men and their second mistake was not paying attention to the massive size of his steel balls.The sheer awesomeness and badassery this man unleashed in the defense of that pure girl will haunt them for the rest of their lives.



posted on Feb, 3 2011 @ 03:11 PM
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Gurkhas face discrimination in pension rights

I think the focus on the badassedness of Gurkhas- even with this exaggerated story- should bring everyone's attention to this story about the discrimination that the brave gurkha soldiers face when the government deams their service less valuable than that of Britons.



posted on Feb, 3 2011 @ 04:33 PM
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Originally posted by simples

just for peoples general knowledge the Kukri isnt a weapon it is actually used for cooking or at least that is its main purpose.

And this is what the Australian soldiers get instead of a Kukri.



F.R.E.D - A small device which is a combination of a can opener, a bottle opener and a spoon. Officially named a "Field Ration Eating Device", but more popularly known as a "F--king Ridiculous/Retarded Eating Device". In the Air Force this acronym can also denote a 'F--king Ridiculous Electronic Device'.

Appendix:Australian English military slang



posted on Feb, 3 2011 @ 04:54 PM
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Originally posted by OrionHunterX
A soldier sharpening his khukri before the Republic Day parade, New Delhi


Courtesy: Defenceforumindia
Thank you for my new wall paper, I go all weak at the knees for a cute guy in a uniform.



posted on Feb, 3 2011 @ 05:08 PM
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Woot chalk one up for the good guy's!!! I can't help but remember the movie Crocodile Dundee "Thats not a knife... THIS is a knife." I bet the look on these robbers faces when he pulled that thing out was very close to the gangsters faces in the movie. Can you say deer in the headlights. Hell I say hire these guy's as air marshalls. Box cutter vs. Kukri... Hmmm wonder what would win?



posted on Feb, 3 2011 @ 05:20 PM
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reply to post by Rock Ape
 


I was going to refer this guy to the Bad Ass of the Week SITE but hes! already there ! LOL cool!


Here is the Site !

Bad as of the Week
www.badassoftheweek.com...


Bishnu Shrestha
www.badassoftheweek.com...


I wish our military! ( American) Issue this for Our Soldiers!

Tomahawk (axe)
en.wikipedia.org...

Well at one time they did !!


Modern-day Tomahawks have gained in popularity with the re-emergence of the "Vietnam Tomahawk" by American Tomahawk Company in the beginning of 2001, and a collaboration with Custom Knife-maker Ernest Emerson of Emerson Knives.[6] Modern-day Tomahawks designed by the late Peter LaGana included wood handles, a hatchet-like bit and a leather sheath and were used by select U.S. forces during the Vietnam war and are referred to as "Vietnam Tomahawks".[6][8]
edit on 3-2-2011 by Wolfenz because: (no reason given)


ok never mind LOL its Issued!




Military application R&D Hawk by Sayoc-Winkler Knives 2 American Tomahawk Company's "VTAC" ("Vietnam Tactical Tomahawk") is in use by the US Army Stryker Brigade in Afghanistan, the 172nd SBCT Team based at Fort Wainwright, the 3rd Brigade, 2nd Infantry Division out of Fort Lewis, a Recon Platoon in the 2-183d CAV (116th IBCT)(OIF 2007-2008) and numerous other soldiers.[6][9] The VTAC was issued a National Stock Number (4210-01-518-7244) and classified as a “Class 9 rescue kit” as a result of a program called the Rapid Fielding Initiative; it is also included within every Stryker vehicle as the “Modular Entry Tool set”.[6][9] This design is enjoying something of a renaissance with US soldiers in Iraq and Afghanistan as a tool and in use in hand-to-hand combat.[10] The Sayoc-Winkler Knives 2 "R&D Hawk" was developed by ABS Mastersmith Daniel Winkler and Sayoc Tactical Group Tomahawk Instructor Rafael Kayanan's design of a hawk for modern applications.[11] According to military after action reports, apart from use as a CQB weapon, the tomahawk's modern use includes non-explosive dynamic entry, obstacle removal, lock/hasp removal, opening crates, ventilating fuel drums, digging fighting positions, personal defense, and IED removal.[9]

R&D Hawk by Sayoc-Winkler Knives 2 I LOVE IT!!
edit on 3-2-2011 by Wolfenz because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 3 2011 @ 07:41 PM
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reply to post by hp1229
 


Definately! The Ghurkas I have met are some of the nicest blokes I have ever met. Funniest I have experienced was when I was standing at the gangway of one of the cruise ships, just chatting to one of the guys I had met before, when a 2 older Americans were coming back on board. One of the guys was drunk as, and was talking down to Ripu (the Ghurka, Ripu was his name), and being a bit arrogant towards him. Ripu just smiled it off and finished every sentence to the bloke with "Sir".

Meanwhile, I was standing there thinking "mate, if you knew what this guy is effing capable of, that attitude would disappear quick smart".

After the guy walked off, I could see Ripu was a bit pissed off with the guy, and I just said to him "mate, don't worry about it. The guy was drunk, and probably didn't even realise the way he was talking to you. Just give him a bit of grief next time he tries to come on board!"

He didn't realise at the time that I was being sarcastic about giving the guy grief, and said to me "But I can't do that sir, I don't wanna lose my job!"

I just laughed and told him not to worry, I had been joking, and he told me "Oh, sorry sir". To get a laugh out of him I replied with "Sir!?!?!?! Bull# Sir! I work for my money!!!"

That certainly got a laugh out of him



posted on Feb, 4 2011 @ 12:01 AM
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I’m not sure if it’s true or not.

But apparently one of the reasons Aussie soldiers are taught to tie their boot laces in a certain way is so the Gurkha can tell if thye are ally or enemy.

As they crawl around at night they can get close enough to their target without being noticed, the Gurkha will then run his finger along the top of boot to see who owns it.



posted on Feb, 4 2011 @ 01:08 AM
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To those who doubt the effectiveness of bringing a knife to gunfight consider this; Most people with a hand gun aren't very good shots, despite what they might claim. If a man with a knife pulls the knife and starts to close on the man with the gun(who, besides not being able to shoot very well, is probably sh##ing his pants, can't get a decent shot off) suddenly feels a knife in his ribs, or at his throat, depending on how generous the the knife wielder is,
Folks, if you depend on a hand gun, practice as if you life depends on it. Because it does.
Blade folks, keep your edges sharp, you speed up, and be prepared for anything.



posted on Feb, 4 2011 @ 04:39 AM
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Talking of a Gorkha's bravery, here's what Major Dhan Singh Thapa of the Indian Army's 8th Gurkha Rifles did in the 1962 Indo-China war and was honored with the highest wartime gallantry medal, the Param Vir Chakra.

......Two concerted attacks later, Major Thapa again repulsed the third attack, inflicting heavy losses on the Chinese. This third Chinese attack included tanks in support of the infantry. The defenders were weakened by the casualties suffered in earlier attacks, but held out while the ammunition lasted.

When the Chinese finally overran the post, Major Thapa jumped out of his trench and killed a dozen Chinese in hand-to-hand fighting using his Khukri as a lethal weapon.
(He was eventually overpowered and captured).

From the History of the Indian Army

edit on 4-2-2011 by OrionHunterX because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 6 2011 @ 02:57 PM
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Hello guys,this is my first post here and i find this site very useful, so back to the thread, i have seen the same topic on many forums with that Telegraph article that is downplaying the story,but personally i wouldnt rely on it,as it is from the city of the railway minister herself and she would not be very happy to tell that when a train was being looted on such a massive scale,the GRP on train were sleeping.And hey this is India,media under the control of politicians is so common here.
I searched other Indian news articles and most said the number of robbers was something around 30,(if that make any difeerence to his badassness
,i did so much research because i so wanted this story to b true,which to my relief is. Here look at another of his interview.Hope we have more like him in the world.
myrepublica.com...
edit on 6-2-2011 by thisisme because: (no reason given)





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