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Thundersnow...A Rising Phenomenon?

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posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 05:41 PM
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reply to post by ~Lucidity
 


Total credit to you for your diligence in finding the info on gravity waves,in my thread ,its official the earth is cracking up,I postulated about these affects and possible explanations and links but could`nt find much on recorded gravity wave influences.
Congrats star and flag,all the way to the top OP.
Forgot another anomalywww.nasa.gov...
edit on 2-2-2011 by gringoboy because: (no reason given)




posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 05:49 PM
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wow i've never actually heard of that before thanks for the post, that thunder snow stuff looks so damn weird lol.



posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 06:10 PM
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we had nearly a weeks worth of it on and off here in ireland from the end of november to the end of the first week of december 2010 was pretty spectacular. the hole sky was lighting up with flash's every few mins for around 15-16 hours solid, forums around here where full of comments from people not knowing what was causing this

we had a mixture of snow, hail, thunder & lightning all at the same time

heres a few videos of it






posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 06:18 PM
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CNN just ran a blip about thundersnow!

I was thinking, omg, MSM stealing from ATS again!

(They never steal any of my stuff.
)



posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 07:09 PM
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reply to post by reverandrandy
 

The snow really changes the whole lightning experience, that's for sure. The one time I heard/saw this it was short but memorable...the color and the sound and oddly enough the silence. All mixed up. Nature's just amazing beyond words sometimes.

reply to post by Portlandia
 

Haha...I keep hearing Tina Turner singing Thunder Dome for some reason.

reply to post by ladyinwaiting
 

Thanks
Always fun to learn new things. I do wish there was more about this online, Patrick Markets published this in a journal (Market, P.S., C.E. Halcomb, and R.L. Ebert, 2002.A climatology of thundersnow events over the contiguous United States. Wea. Forecasting, 17 , 1290-1295.), but I was too cheap to buy it

A climatology (climatological description of spatial, temporal, and synoptic characteristics) of snow events with thunder is presented for the contiguous United States. Based upon 30 yr of 3-hourly reports from 204 stations in the 48 contiguous United States, 229 reports are extracted from the 3-hourly observations (consistently bearing the present-weather group in each surface observation) that featured thunder with snow only. When these reports are plotted spatially, the central United States, the intermountain west, and the Great Lakes region emerge as the preferred regions for thundersnow occurrence. A thundersnow event is then defined. Isolated thundersnow reports clearly constitute a thundersnow event. Also, multiple thundersnow reports that are not separated spatially by over 1100 km or temporally by 6 h are considered part of one event. The location reporting the first occurrence of thunder with snow in such a collection of stations then carries the representative time and location for the event. The 229 individual reports make up 191 thundersnow events. Temporal analysis of thundersnow events reveals a nationwide seasonal preference for occurrence in March but no clear diurnal preference. Most thundersnow events are typically reported at only one station and only rarely in consecutive 3-hourly observations. These results thus reinforce the notion of thundersnow as a fairly localized phenomenon of limited duration. In terms of intensity, the thundersnow events investi ... www.refdoc.fr...


I forgot to include it in the OP. Oh well.

reply to post by BlackPoison94
 

Thanks, Blackpoison. It was fun doing this one. Appreciate the information on gravity waves. Eleven seemed like a lot to me, and then that story about that big one knocking down trees and power lines in Huntsville too? I bet they're experimenting with something like on Eureka.


reply to post by Attrei
 

Farmer's almanac is great. We get it and their calender every year. There's a lot of wisdom there. Thanks



posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 07:10 PM
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reply to post by ladyinwaiting
 

CNN ran a blip?
I know Bill Maher and Jon Stewart steal stuff from us but CNN? They'd be wise to!


reply to post by dazirl
 

Thanks, dazirl...will watch those now. There seems to be a lot of thundersnow in the US, UK, Canana, and we heard from Germany here. I saw a few references to Australia too. (Ugh...links not working.)

reply to post by gringoboy
 

Something whacky's going on there in Huntsville. A few years back...well, maybe I'll leave that for a U2U. I've been following your thread. All I can say is wow. Someone posted something earlier today too about magnetic something or another off the coast of FL and off another coast too (can't think of it now). Did you see it? I'll see if I can find it again. (Okay...can't find the thread...may not have been ATS, but this is what it was about www.rumormillnews.com... )

reply to post by reaperreapz
 

Welcome! Glad you enjoyed it.

reply to post by soficrow
 

Yay! Thanks, soficrow.


reply to post by stars15k
 

We had huge thunder here yesterday, but no snow. Bet there are plenty of people in the U.S. today who would be happy to share some with GA. Some places are just getting slammed this season. No fun.
edit on 2/2/2011 by ~Lucidity because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 07:24 PM
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reply to post by ~Lucidity
 


I witnessed thunder snow several times while living in Michigan... which included very beautiful pink/lavender lightning. At the time... I was told that it was a lake-effect phenomenon... which I now believe to be incorrect... because a few years ago I witnessed the same phenomenon happen in North Dakota... where it has/had previously NEVER happened before. It was a new experience for people in this area.



posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 07:26 PM
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reply to post by 1088no5
 

That's exactly what color it was here too...a light pink lavender. Not just the lightning but the whole sky. There are apparently four kinds of formations and lake effect and ocean effect is one of them. the other three kinds seem more rare. One of the others is similar to the conditions that form normal thunderstorms and tornadoes. Thanks for reading.


edit on 2/2/2011 by ~Lucidity because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 07:40 PM
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reply to post by ~Lucidity
 


That would explain the british geological survey in antartic then,I mean there are answers and if the solar system has become more electrostatic as we move through it then a lunar eclipse that coincides with closest perhelion to sun ,we would get some sort of increase in electromagnetic discharge from mother earths dynamo.
Maybe thats why theres a increase in thundersnows,so many oddities ,it can`t all be because we have all became aware of it as its to often ,and events of late to coincidental.
edit on 2-2-2011 by gringoboy because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 07:45 PM
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reply to post by gringoboy
 

That could well be. What concerns me is how they keep saying, "we don't know..." There's a lot here that's connected, and something is definitely "up." All we can do is keep watching and trying to put it together. Have you seen the latest earthquake prediction thread?



posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 07:49 PM
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reply to post by ~Lucidity
 


For sure zorgon the great ,brill,I tryed to explain the same on there,the video is very scary,and just goes to show ,what lies will be told to stop people moving until the last minute..



posted on Feb, 3 2011 @ 12:35 AM
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sorry about that dont know why the videos didnt show up as i used the youtube tab when posting

heres the videos again, (the ones i can remember) but just the links this time, most of the videos online show the thunder that came just before or after the snow

www.youtube.com...
www.youtube.com...

this is the lightning that started around 10 hours before the snow came

www.youtube.com...



posted on Feb, 3 2011 @ 03:54 AM
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reply to post by dazirl
 


Thank you! Gotta love the title of the first one..."End of the World Weather."



posted on Feb, 3 2011 @ 05:11 AM
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reply to post by gringoboy
 


I finally found the other thread again...www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Feb, 3 2011 @ 05:57 AM
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Originally posted by ~Lucidity
Have you ever heard thunder during a snowstorm?


YES. I'm 48 and when I remember having it when I was a kid growing up in Connecticut.
It's a natural thing. No big deal.

The Jim Cantore event was funny. I love the guy.
He's a seasoned reporter yet when it hit right overhead he nearly lost his pudd'n.



posted on Feb, 3 2011 @ 09:17 AM
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Just another weatherperson's explanation of thundersnow. Don't be shocked!


A blizzard is one thing, but what is thundersnow?



posted on Feb, 3 2011 @ 09:35 AM
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reply to post by FlyersFan
 


Nearly lost his pudd'n, eh???
I'll have to remember that saying. Very funny.



posted on Feb, 3 2011 @ 09:47 AM
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reply to post by gerg357
 

Ha. I think it's a dumb name. But apparently someone dubbed it "thundersnow" back in the 1970s sometime and it stuck?



posted on Feb, 3 2011 @ 10:42 AM
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during the snow storm here in maryland last week, my wife and i saw lighting and heard a thunder clap. she looked at me and asked if that was normal during a snowstorm. i said it was possible but not really a usual occurrence. its strange that over night it became a usual occurrence, or at least was mass spread.

but it seems like every thing strange now a days has become a usual occurrence........



posted on Feb, 3 2011 @ 11:38 AM
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reply to post by ~Lucidity
 


In the mid 1970's a devestating Thundersnow Storm hit the area of Western Pennsylvania I was living in in the rural Alleghaney Mountains. Extremeley rare, most of the residents were generational and had lived in the surrounding mountains their whole lives.

None had ever seen a Thundersnow Storm before and many of the people thought it might be an Applocalyptical moment because of all the thunder and lightening occuring with a snow fall so heavy in it's initial stages it was coming down at a rate of 6 inches an hour.

The storm left my home with out power for 30 days and telephone service for 90 days.

Thankfully my grandparents were old enough and had the kind of home where even in the dead of winter they had the essentials like fireplaces, kaerosene stoves, a groto for storing perishible foods, and a spring house to get fresh running water, and and old Out House (latrine) for sanitation.

It sure was an incredible experience, not just the snowstorm itself but living a whole month in a hostile freezing climate with none of the modern conveinences and technologies we all rely on.

Great thread, thanks for sharing.




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