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Qantas plane drops 26,000 feet during Melbourne-bound flight

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posted on Jan, 31 2011 @ 08:00 PM
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reply to post by dniMnepO
 


Me too!




posted on Jan, 31 2011 @ 08:11 PM
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reply to post by JakiusFogg
 


The gent in the petticoat and mask, doffing his hat is entirely correct.

HERE is a video I found (after suffering through some terrible ones made by desktop simulator guys) of professionals in a Boeing 767 simulator, demonstrating a proper rapid loss of cabin pressure, and proper Emergency Descent Procedure. Note, the first four rapid "chimes" you hear are the "Master Caution" alert, with the amber light and EICAS message on the center CRT... due to the pressurization fault (excessive cabin rate of climb). Later, as the cabin exceeds 10,000 feet, the "Master Warning" siren sounds briefly (one of the crew silences it, because it's loud and annoying). Rest is the "memory items" (masks on, establish communication) and then the decent profile, with checklist back-up:




posted on Jan, 31 2011 @ 08:18 PM
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reply to post by weedwhacker
 


Nice find. there are also some good airbus ECAM message handling trainliung videos on youtube, once you filter out the MSFS rubbish!

BTW it's a tailcoat not a petticoat. that's something ladies wear under their skirts



posted on Jan, 31 2011 @ 08:24 PM
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reply to post by JakiusFogg
 


I stand corrected!!! On the "petticoat".....what would you expect from a Yank, anyway?? LOL!

(Reminded of an old, old TV show from the 1960s..."Petticoat Junction". Spin off from "Green Acres", I think....).

Anyway....forget which member posted the hyperbolic "quotes" from a passenger, who severely exaggerated the entire incident...doesn't match with the news article.

Why do laypeople over-blow these things?? Lack of understanding or....well, in the USA I'd suspect a potential lawsuit brewing, for "emotional distress" or some such rot....not sure about Aussies, if they are equally prone to such shenanigans? Are they just as litigious?
edit on 31 January 2011 by weedwhacker because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 31 2011 @ 08:26 PM
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Originally posted by PETROLCOIN
I blame fireworks.
nice avatar,. I cheesehead also
Oh and to the op,. old news
edit on 31-1-2011 by Lil Drummerboy because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 31 2011 @ 08:27 PM
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reply to post by weedwhacker
 


Slow news day I suspect. Although I also think the media is putting Qantas under a lot of pressure at the moment following the recent incidents with the 747 decompression and the A380 Engine issue. so literally anything no matter how mundane gets reported.

not fair really, when there are a lot of other issues in the industry that cause much more concern.



posted on Jan, 31 2011 @ 09:04 PM
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Is it even possible for a large, in tact plane to just drop out of the sky at cruising altitude? I thought it wasn't, and even if both engines fail the plane will glide for some time....



posted on Jan, 31 2011 @ 09:12 PM
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The key is to get the plane to a lower altitude ie breatheable air. At 36000 feet you dont have much functional time before you black out. Hence the dive to a lower altitude
edit on 1/31/11 by FredT because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 31 2011 @ 09:15 PM
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reply to post by FredT
 


But wouldn't the O2 masks have dropped, giving them time to make a more gradual descent?
edit on 31-1-2011 by 27jd because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 31 2011 @ 09:37 PM
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reply to post by 27jd
 


The passenger O2 mask generators last for about 10-15 minutes. Of course, below about 15,000 and most everyone will be fine. Just sitting there. Panic-stricken hyperventilation aside......

It is SOP to go to at least 10,000....for the flight deck crew regulations. (Actually, you are allowed to be off O2 above 10,000, below 12,000 for up to 30 minutes). There are cases, such as mountainous terrain, where the MEA/MSA (minimum enroute altitude/minimum sector altitude) is above 10,000...in which case, you descend to MEA/MSA...and flight crew keep masks on (enough for several hours)....while the people in back will be fine, even if only a few thousand above 10,000.

The descent procedure is to be accomplished methodically, per procedure...not in a panic, and haphazardly. Also, you heard mention of "structural damage suspected" or words to that effect? I always was amused because, you're well into the descent, by the time you read that bit in the QRH (quick reference handbook) checklist procedure.

Of course, here's what we know, from practicing the drills: IF you see an obvious reason for the explosive/rapid decompression (a door warning light, or known breach in the pressure vessel) then you descend at the SAME indicated airspeed that you are showing, at cruise....IF no structural damage indicated (so, a mechanical/computer malfunction....there are several redundant systems, though...)....anyway, if that's the case then you just let speed increase up to the "barber pole" which is maximum (Vmo). Along with speed brakes...this gives the maximum rate of descent.

Simple, eh?

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

About the latest Qantas -- I know the 737 (and 757/767) pretty well...will be interested to read the report on this....I have some ideas, though. But, not enough info, now....whether they dispatched with some equipment inoperative, or not. Perfctly normal to do that, is why there's the MEL (minimum equipment list). Used to authorize flights with some (redundant) equipment out of order, until repairs can be made later. Without the MEL would be a lot more delays ... this gives airline some leeway to maintain a schedule, and defer maintenance...but only up to a point, and there are multiple limitations imposed.

It's possible (just hypohesis) that the airplane dispatched with one engine bleed source inop....so, one engine supplied one pressurization pack, and the APU was used for the other. A pack can fail, for many reasons...internal failure, internal overheat (and system will "trip" off. like a circuit breaker)....APU can fail, flame out, etc. Just a few ideas, not saying these were the case.

Here, the panel for Boeing 737 NG pneumatic system, engine and APU bleed controls, and pack switches...and the pressurization control panel (you can't see, cut-off on the left, the cabin altimeter and rate of climb nstruments. To the left of the altitude horn cutout button):





Condition, there is airplane on ground, engines not running, APU off, packs off. Engine bleed switches usually just left to ON position....except for certain occasions. "Bleeds Off" takeoff, engine failure/fire procedures, duct overheat conditions, or when the Bleed is placarded inoperative. Etc.
edit on 31 January 2011 by weedwhacker because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 31 2011 @ 11:27 PM
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i find it funny that its not safe to fly with the safest commerical airline in the world as statistics say that they are bound to crash one of these days!!

crazy world

start wars to bring peace
haha errr



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