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Forclosing on habitat for humanity homes

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posted on Jan, 31 2011 @ 11:41 AM
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reply to post by macman
 

The part that boggles the mind is that they choose to buy a new TV instead of make the house payment. Many folks who have Habitat homes have used it to thier advantage, not having to stress over working two jobs to pay outrageous rent gives them time to do things like go back to school and get a better education so they can get a higher paying job. The higher paying job means the pay the house off faster and have more expendable income so that they can actually afford to buy something like a big screen TV.

To be able to afford a big screen, after all the bills are paid, the kids clothed, and food is on the table ,etc., is acceptable. They earned it. But to buy the TV first and worry about making the house payment after is(to me) the wrong way to go about it.




posted on Jan, 31 2011 @ 11:45 AM
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reply to post by Rossa
 


That activity is how the got there in the first place.
Giving them a home, with a low payment really doesn't help them in the end.



posted on Jan, 31 2011 @ 11:50 AM
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reply to post by SKinLaB
 


Please read Rossa's post to see how wrong you are.



posted on Jan, 31 2011 @ 11:55 AM
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reply to post by SKinLaB
 


You are seeing one of Habitats main problems, "Perception". Everyone seems to perceive Habitat as a minority based program, and its not. Anyone with a low income can apply, we would love to have them participate. But we seem to get mostly minorities. My affiliate has tried reaching out to other populations, but not mych of a response.
Just a side note once they own thehome gov. housing subsidy no longer applies because the cost of the home is too low.
edit on 31-1-2011 by Rossa because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 31 2011 @ 12:03 PM
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reply to post by lonegurkha
 


I think the bankers bit off more than they could chew, having a few homes on the books is acceptable, but they started getting onto shaky ground when it went up into the thousands. Theres not much they can do with them. Around here( in the mid west) most of the banks are just sitting on them. Theres a select few people out there who actually have the credit to purchase them, or are sure enough about thier job to buy. Its a shame really, I see empty beautiful homes everyday, and you know its costing more and more money to keep all of the pipes from freezing all winter long. Some of our local banks have started foreclosing, but allowing the homeowner to remain in the home until May. Its a way to keep the home occupied so it doesnt have all the copper wiring stolen out of it, the heat on so the pipes dont freeze, and keep it from being vandalized. It also gives the market a few months to turn around, so that hopefully it can be sold. Wishful thinking on thier part, I dont think the economy is gonna come back that fast.



posted on Jan, 31 2011 @ 12:11 PM
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Originally posted by macman
reply to post by Rossa
 


That activity is how the got there in the first place.
Giving them a home, with a low payment really doesn't help them in the end.


According to the link in the OP, some are failing to the point of foreclosure.

But feel free to tar all those who have qualified for a Habitat for Humanity home with the same waster brush.

Even those who prioritise t.v's over their bills deserve pity, not for the state of their poverty but the poverty of their values, that they have been so completely mind-controlled by the relentless marketing machine that is the devil in the corner, t.v.

And yes, state sponsored charity is worthless if it does not require some form of self reliance to support it.



posted on Jan, 31 2011 @ 12:11 PM
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I help Habitat for Humanity in my spare time (when I have spare time
) here; it is my favorite charity. I have helped on dozens of homes, providing labor (myself and my family), providing transportation to others who wanted to help, recruiting labor from others, and even loaning tools to them. It has always been my understanding that there was no mortgage involved; the land is donated by individuals, the labor is given free by people in the community, the materials are either donated by local lumber companies (in return for advertising and community goodwill) or bought using financial donations.

Individuals who want to get a home of their own apply and are chosen based on need and a personal assessment by those who manage the program... they are required to assist in the building of not only their own home, but the building of others as well (unless they can show they are physically incapable, then other arrangements are made). This keeps a labor force going.

So where did the mortgage come from? Did the people in foreclosure mortgage their home after it was built? Or did they have an agreement with HfH to pay a percentage because they wanted something a little nicer? Maybe mortgages are used in areas where the donations fall short of what is needed?

To those who decry this charity: Habitat for Humanity cannot possibly fill all the requests they get; there is a huge waiting list, and those chosen in the end are typically those who start working on homes before they are approved. That makes perfect sense, as it shows a willingness to work for what they get. Having a house of your own is not a right; you have to do something to get it.

I personally know the houses that are built here. They are modest, yes, but far, far, far from crackerboxes. They use quality lumber and the people in charge of construction are retired contractors... in most cases, some of the best contractors that we have, since they are the ones who made enough before retirement to be able to afford to help. I myself have worked in construction quite a bit between careers (and my first career was in architectural design), so I do know what I am talking about. Certain disciplines like electrical and plumbing and HVAC are performed by licensed sub-contractors who donate their time as well.

Jimmy Carter, last I heard, has little to do with HfH now; it was his idea and he supported it back when it was formed. Yeah, he was a lousy President, maybe even a so-so Governor (so I have been told), but he deserved a Nobel Peace Prize for founding Habitat for Humanity if nothing else.

All this complaining sounds like sour grapes to me.

TheRedneck



posted on Jan, 31 2011 @ 12:21 PM
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reply to post by TheRedneck
 


Earlier in this thread Rossa wrote that they are employed by habitat in the state where they live and explained how the mortgage operates.I did think that this was how habitat operated but now you say there are no mortgages.Could it be that they operate differently in different states?
edit on 1/31/2011 by lonegurkha because: spelling



posted on Jan, 31 2011 @ 12:25 PM
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reply to post by TheRedneck
 


Thank You for your work with HFH, we do appreciate it.
My particular affiliate gives a low interest mortgage to our qualifying families, the costs they pay over a 30 year period are for the cost of materials, nothing else, thats how we keep the payments so low. ALL of the labor is donated by volunteers. Many affiliates require many more hours of work (sweat equity) from thier families than we do, but many of them have funding donations that number far above ours. We build 7-10 houses a year that is all. You are right most of the property is donated to us, but on occasion we purchase at a deep discount a peice here and there.

As for the Founder of Habitat: The founder of Habitat for Humanity International
Millard Fuller founded Habitat for Humanity International in 1976 and served in executive roles until 2005. His leadership helped forge Habitat into a worldwide Christian housing ministry.

In 1996, former U.S. President Bill Clinton awarded Fuller the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civilian honor, calling Habitat “…the most successful continuous community service project in the history of the United States.”

Mr. Fuller passed away in February, 2009 at the age of 74.

Jimmy Carter was so instrumental in raising awareness about Habitat that it is often assumed that he is the founder of the program, he is not.



posted on Jan, 31 2011 @ 12:26 PM
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reply to post by TheRedneck
 


Ahhh... a calm voice. Prior to my own volunteerism with this organization more than 15 years ago I was under the same impression that the homes were mortgage free, they are not. Following, is a link to the Habitat website that lists out the responsibilities of the future homeowner. It does indicate that timely mortgage payments are a requirement of the homeowner, just as anyone else who owns a home.


How to Apply for a Habitat House



posted on Jan, 31 2011 @ 12:28 PM
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reply to post by lonegurkha
 


Each affiliate is allowed leeway to administer the program as it sees fit, it may be the case that other affiliates have no mortgages attached because the mortgage is exchanged out in working hours. I havent heard of it, but it is possible, and for an affiliate with alot of money but a low working base, that might just be the best way to go.



posted on Jan, 31 2011 @ 12:32 PM
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reply to post by Rossa
 


Once again thanks for the clarity Rossa.I think that I will leave this in your very capable hands. Thank you for all the help here.You are clearly passionate about what you do and have great knowledge of the subject.Thank you again.



posted on Jan, 31 2011 @ 12:32 PM
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reply to post by MyMindIsMyOwn
 


Thank you for the information and link. I work primarily with finding families and thier qualifications, I was also aware that some of the locations particularly areas hit by hurricane Katrina are overloaded with funding but cant keep enough help to build the homes, and I beleive some dispensations as far as mortgages has been given in lieu of hours worked. As with most things, you do what you have to do to keep the program running, and more folks getting houses.



posted on Jan, 31 2011 @ 12:33 PM
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Originally posted by teapot

Originally posted by macman
reply to post by Rossa
 


That activity is how the got there in the first place.
Giving them a home, with a low payment really doesn't help them in the end.


According to the link in the OP, some are failing to the point of foreclosure.

But feel free to tar all those who have qualified for a Habitat for Humanity home with the same waster brush.

Even those who prioritise t.v's over their bills deserve pity, not for the state of their poverty but the poverty of their values, that they have been so completely mind-controlled by the relentless marketing machine that is the devil in the corner, t.v.

And yes, state sponsored charity is worthless if it does not require some form of self reliance to support it.


Pity does nothing for them. Blaming society and everything else except themselves seems to be the going trend for most people these days.
The dog made me do it, or I saw it on TV. Load of BS either way.
Forcing someone to stand on their own feet and have them make their life how they want it to be does more.



posted on Jan, 31 2011 @ 12:36 PM
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reply to post by lonegurkha
 


Sorry didnt mean to kype your thread, nice one though.
Thanks
Rossa



posted on Jan, 31 2011 @ 12:40 PM
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Originally posted by Rossa
reply to post by SKinLaB
 


You are seeing one of Habitats main problems, "Perception". Everyone seems to perceive Habitat as a minority based program, and its not. Anyone with a low income can apply, we would love to have them participate. But we seem to get mostly minorities. My affiliate has tried reaching out to other populations, but not mych of a response.
Just a side note once they own thehome gov. housing subsidy no longer applies because the cost of the home is too low.
edit on 31-1-2011 by Rossa because: (no reason given)


Ok i stand corrected. Thank you.



posted on Jan, 31 2011 @ 12:48 PM
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reply to post by Rossa

As I appreciate your help. I have to admire a charity that gives so much, and still requires that someone actually cares about what they receive. The sweat equity concept is so reminiscent of how homes were built in olden days, right down to the general attitude the volunteers have when working on an house... it's not a job, it's something they just do.

I just wish I had more time or money to help out.

I appreciate your explanation. From a few chats with the guy who handles the homebuilding for HfH, I knew about the homeowner education (a great idea as well, as there is a world of difference between renting and owning), but a mortgage was never mentioned. I know I have seen some people helping to build their house who looked as though they couldn't afford a pot to pee in. They did work as hard if not harder than anyone else on site, though, which earned them my respect. I would hate to think that they were then saddled with a payment they couldn't afford.

I do know that each area sets its own restrictions, around the International basic guidelines. It is entirely possible these homes here are mortgage-free, or at least much lower than what I have heard in this thread. In this area, $450 a month is considered a pretty substantial house payment.

That reminds me.... spring is coming! Time to drag out the tools and maybe get a few more Saturdays in.


TheRedneck



posted on Jan, 31 2011 @ 01:03 PM
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reply to post by TheRedneck
 


I would personaly like to thank you for the volunteer work that you are donating.I wish there were more like you.



posted on Jan, 31 2011 @ 01:04 PM
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Originally posted by autowrench
What I am wondering is this; what do these billionaire bankers plan to do with all of these foreclosed, empty homes? I live in a small town, As of the census of 2000, there were 6,078 people, 2,359 households, and 1,644 families residing in the city. I would estimate that over 100 homes or more are sitting empty right now. You cannot rent them, or buy them, true ownership is very murky. I tried for several months to locate the bank that owns a nice A Frame home down the hill from me, and I simply cannot locate who owns the property. Even the Abstract Company doesn't know. What is the BANKING CARTEL planning for all of these empty houses? Provide homes for invading Immigrants? Living quarters for invading military? Quarters for Aliens?
What?


Are you really that helpless? Go to your county auditor, type in the address of the property, and the owner magically appears: Here. I'll even provide the link for you: It's right here. Ownership isn't murky at all.



posted on Jan, 31 2011 @ 01:04 PM
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reply to post by Rossa
 


No thanks necessary! This is something that I have been passionate about for a long long time. It all started, for me, by helping to make lunches for the work crews and has grown to the point that I have done everything from landscaping to framing to roofing and just about everything in between and have loved every single minute of it.

As the moderator mentioned, I have also seen a great many folks working on their homes that look as though they have "no pot to pee in"... and for some that was literal. I subscribe to no religious affiliation and would rather be more spititual than religious anyway, as a personal way of thinking, however I do keep this mantra in the back of my mind "There but for the grace of God go I".
edit on 31-1-2011 by MyMindIsMyOwn because: grammer




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