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When it comes to paychecks, body size matters

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posted on Jan, 30 2011 @ 03:03 AM
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When it comes to paychecks, body size matters


www.washingtonpost.com

The study found that thin women are paid significantly more than their average-size counterparts, while heavier women make less. Skinnier-than-average men, on the other hand, cash smaller paychecks than their average-weight peers.

Experts say it's just another sign that as a society, we've internalized the unrealistic, media-driven physical ideals that show up in the workplace -- and therefore the pocketbook.

(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Jan, 30 2011 @ 03:03 AM
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Isn't it true, looks over talent? Employers pay for what they see. I believe it goes beyond the media depicting the image of what body proportins are proper. People with specific appearance are more likely to be put in jobs of responsibility.


Many companies are very conscious about the "look" they have representing their company, Rothausen-Vange said, knowing that potential clients or investors will share these internalized values, as well.

Seth Rieder, a designer for an advertising and marketing company in Minneapolis, said he has seen the stereotype play out. "Taller, more muscular guys, bigger guys, seem like they have more power and can be more intimidating, and I think that can link to where you move in a company," he said.


There are obvious social biases that are carried into the workplace. Ones economic status may be more a matter of genetics than talent and abilities.

www.washingtonpost.com
(visit the link for the full news article)


edit on 30-1-2011 by Erongaricuaro because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 30 2011 @ 03:12 AM
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I remember hearing something awhile back from a study of women in the workplace based on looks. It actually made sense in a sad way, it went like this:

Women who are better looking tend to get paid more because they seem more productive. They seemmore productive because the better looking a woman is the more other people are inclined to help her with her work or in some cases do it for her.

I suppose in a sense you can see how this works and if you think to your own workplace, probably see this happening. Not that it makes the workplace as a whole more productive. There is a lot of prejudice involved in this, shame.



posted on Jan, 30 2011 @ 03:14 AM
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Maybe it's all those supermodels, athletes and movie stars that are fudging the numbers. They do make around 1000 times what the average person does.



posted on Jan, 30 2011 @ 07:04 AM
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Personally, I am paid exactly the same as everyone else I work with. There is one person that is an exception at my job. She does the same thing I do, is only 10 years older than me, looks at least 20 years older than me, does not take care of herself at all and she makes 50% more in salary than the rest of us. Why, that is anyone's guess.

I look at the wage issue this way. If I hire a contractor to do work on my house, when they come to give me a bid, I look into their trucks. If their truck is neat and organized, I will take their bid seriously. If it is sloppy, I don't. Why? If they can take the time to keep their truck clean, then their work is going to be clean and organized.

This can apply to the common workplace. If you care enough to keep yourself healthy and clean, then your work is going to be the same.



posted on Jan, 30 2011 @ 09:57 AM
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Originally posted by DonnaLynn
Personally, I am paid exactly the same as everyone else I work with. There is one person that is an exception at my job. She does the same thing I do, is only 10 years older than me, looks at least 20 years older than me, does not take care of herself at all and she makes 50% more in salary than the rest of us. Why, that is anyone's guess.

I look at the wage issue this way. If I hire a contractor to do work on my house, when they come to give me a bid, I look into their trucks. If their truck is neat and organized, I will take their bid seriously. If it is sloppy, I don't. Why? If they can take the time to keep their truck clean, then their work is going to be clean and organized.

This can apply to the common workplace. If you care enough to keep yourself healthy and clean, then your work is going to be the same.




Your truck example reminds me of a story about a remote, small town that had only two barbers, each with his own shop. A smart businessman was in town for a week and decided he needed a haircut so he looked at the two shops. One was neat and clean, spotless and new, and that barber's hair was perfectly done. He was a neetly groomed and a good-looking young man. The other shop was old and dingy in need of new paint on the walls, the wastbasket in the waiting area was over-flowing with trash, hair clippings were all over the floor, and the barber himself was old and overweight with smoke-stained fingers and his his hair looked a fright. Which shop did the smart business patronize?

He went to the old and dirty shop, of course. That barber obviously had years of experience, his shop was dirty because he had been too busy to empty the wastebasket that his many customers had filled up with trash while waiting for their turn, and with clippings on the floor that missed being swept-up was evidence he had many customers and a busy shop. With only two barbers in town he had to get his own hair cut from the new and inexperienced barber whose own haircut gave testimony to the old barber's skill. The young barber had such a clean and tidy shop because he had almost no business which left him plenty of time to tidy-up.

Appearances can be deceiving. Perhaps that other person at your work that looks older and is paid more has more experience and skill??


edit on 30-1-2011 by Erongaricuaro because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 30 2011 @ 03:11 PM
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reply to post by Erongaricuaro
 


That is a great story...

Yes, perhaps she is paid more for her experience but that puts holes all into the lead story?



posted on Jan, 30 2011 @ 03:26 PM
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reply to post by Erongaricuaro
 



In my various businesses, I have employed all flavors of women from manufacturing to sales. Attractive women, especially those with large breasts are the best salespeople if they are reasonably conversant. And shy retireing women excel as managers, detail oriented workers and piece work.

When I hire a woman, I always ask her what in capacity she can help the company prosper and give her a chance at that job. They are usually correct. I'm a great guy to work for, pay well, show loyalty to my people and have been successful most of the time. The times I went broke are my own fault.



posted on Jan, 30 2011 @ 03:51 PM
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Originally posted by DonnaLynn
reply to post by Erongaricuaro
 


Yes, perhaps she is paid more for her experience but that puts holes all into the lead story?




Yes, we all know not to put much stock in the ramblings of the MSM. That was taken from the Washington Post for gawd's sake. I was curious about other opinions on this. I believe this happens to a large extent especially when making first judgements.

If the workers' output is not monitored well or supervision is less than observant then I believe promotions are probably given by appearance more than skill. Some employers are wiser than that, like the other gentleman on this thread who lets the new-hire tell them their capabilities and future outlook. I believe they would give an honest assessment of themselves if asked the right questions.


edit on 30-1-2011 by Erongaricuaro because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 30 2011 @ 03:52 PM
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A lot of this will vary from job to job.

In any customer-facing position, it makes sense to hire good-looking people, as they are more likely to attract customers to the business.

I'm sure I'm not the only who - given the choice between two similar shops - will go to the one with the sexier chicks working there.


Whereas, in some other professions, such as in the healtchcare sector, some people may prefer to have someone of more mature years dealing with them, rather than some young whippersnapper who has just come out of Medical School !


There are also other factors, such as a lot of skinny guys won't necessarily be up to some of the more heavy-duty construction type jobs, which can often pay quite tidily.

This means that more average sized men have a wider variety of jobs that they can go for, and consequently have a better chance of earning more; this also explains a lot of the pay gap between men and women.



posted on Jan, 30 2011 @ 04:11 PM
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reply to post by Sherlock Holmes
 


I agree, people have to look the part for the job they're doing. I too am attracted by good-looking ladies. And some more mature people I would trust better for other tasks and services.

The business itself also must be adequately suitable for its niche, proper appearance, proper name. Security First National Bar and Grill just doesn't sound like a relaxing spot to spend an afternoon. Likewise I don't think I would trust my money or the lending practices at Sporty's Savings & Loan.


edit on 30-1-2011 by Erongaricuaro because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 30 2011 @ 04:26 PM
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Wish my employer (healthcare) read that article and paid accordingly. Heh!

I think nepotism and favoritism are much more a factor than appearance/size. At least on every job I've ever had it is.



posted on Jan, 30 2011 @ 04:27 PM
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This doesn't surprise me, and in fact, I've seen it in action, not only when it comes to being paid but also when it comes to being hired to begin with. That being said, I'm not sure this is always a conscious or intentional decision.

When your values are shallow and superficial. you generally get what you deserve. In business and in life.



posted on Jan, 30 2011 @ 04:47 PM
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I am not so sure about this one. I am a small female and thru my work expereince I always felt I was paid less and put into a more difficult position by supervisors that were over weight. Even tho I was always hired to do a specific behind the desk job they had a way to get me to do physical work for them. Such as carrying large heavy boxes, picking up heavy mail bags, cleaning their offices, etc. Some of my superiors didn't know any more about the job than I did - they just got there first - but just the same they were paid more. Well I got tired of that early on and went into business for myself as an antique dealer for 30 plus years. As an employer I never hired anyone because of the way they looked but on how much they knew antiques and their ability to work with the public regardless of weight or looks.



posted on Feb, 1 2011 @ 10:29 AM
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I work front desk at a tanning salon. Typically, the owner doesn't award raises until the employee has worked there for a year or so. I recently got an early raise, simply because I've learned how to use my looks to my advantage... I know, I know, it sounds horribly conniving, but hear me out: If there's one thing I've figured out about life, it's that you can get anything (or most anything) you want simply by ASKING. Sometimes it may not be that the employee is attractive, maybe they get treated differently because they know how to "work it?"

I do know, however, that it can also be the complete opposite. A few years ago, I was a waitress at a restaurant where guests tipped me nothing, hit on me constantly, treated me like disposable meat, and the other employees would make comments behind my back... it can be horribly humiliating sometimes.



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