It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

States inspired by Arizona illegal-immigration law face tough fiscal realities

page: 1
2

log in

join
share:

posted on Jan, 30 2011 @ 02:10 AM
link   

States inspired by Arizona illegal-immigration law face tough fiscal realities


www.washingtonpost.com

In the nine months since the Arizona measure was signed into law, a number of similar bills have stalled or died or are being reworked. Some have faced resistance from law enforcement officials who question how states or communities could afford the added cost of enforcing the laws.

But Krikorian also said that the Arizona bill has "done what it was supposed to do" by creating a national discussion on immigration reform in the absence of federal legislation.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Jan, 30 2011 @ 02:10 AM
link   
Wasn't economics the reason for Arizona to enact those laws in the first place? Arizona voters were complaining about illegal immigrants straining their State's budget by paying out for social and family welfare programs, increased costs for additional law enforcement, and paying for medical expenses for the illegals. It seemed the question and concern was, "How can we afford not to have these laws?" Or was the motive based more on ethnic and racial biases?

Finding and rounding up illegal immigrants is bound to be a greater job than most of the voters had realized. The illegals come not only from Latin-American countries to the south but there are a great number of illegal and undocumented Canadian and European immigrants as well, and that is before taking into account the many from Asian and African countries. They are from all parts of the world. To go after Latinos alone would be racial profiling.

If the interest is truely a concern about the expense of over-extended social aid programs and medical costs then that is rightly where should be the first line of defense over that kind of mis-use, requiring proof of legal residency or visitation before those benefits are given. And for medical aid the same applied but should be given to those in need and requesting assistance, then if proven to be in the US unlawfully the appropriate steps should then be taken by immigrations authorities.

Outside of requiring a national ID for US citizens and legal residents then measures taken by law enforcement officers at street level would be ineffective and a fence along the southern border a waste of resources. Appropriate measures need to be in place where the economic concerns enter into the equation. That is, unless the true motives for passing such legislation have an entirely different agenda.



www.washingtonpost.com
(visit the link for the full news article)


edit on 30-1-2011 by Erongaricuaro because: (no reason given)



new topics
 
2

log in

join