It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Egyptian Youth and New Dawn Hopes

page: 1
4

log in

join
share:

posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 08:28 PM
link   

Egyptian Youth and New Dawn Hopes


english.aljazeera.net

In more than 18 years of living in Cairo, I have never felt the sense of cautious hope that exists in Egypt now, particularly among young men and women who feel that for the first time in their lives they may actually be able to determine their own destinies.

..They have made it clear to me that these opposition parties, long defunct and impotent, have been replaced by grassroots social action. Their fears of detention and torture have been supplanted by the need for better living conditions..
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 08:28 PM
link   
From the streets of Cairo, and in the voices of Egyptian youth - hope. This Al Jazeera article contradicts Western analysis focusing on anarchy, looting and fear.

Egyptians of all walks of life made their message clear: Authoritarian rule is over. True, the revolution may be redirected - tis the way things do work. But in the meantime, there is hope.




The protests have drawn Egyptians from all walks of life, many of whom have never participated in demonstrations and feel that the time has come for them to voice their resentment.

What started with a few dozen protesters on January 25 quickly mushroomed as passers-by and ordinary citizens joined in.

...the silent majority which has finally found a voice to express palpable anger.

Listening to the protesters, one gets the feeling that they have not been deterred by the severity of the beatings; rather, their resolve has been hardened.

In an unprecedented show of civil disobedience and open revolt, young Egyptians have clearly and forcibly delivered a message that is still resonating in the Middle East and North Africa: Authoritarian rule in the region is over.






english.aljazeera.net
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 08:35 PM
link   
The internet is down, so how can we be sure this isn't some big propaganda campaign. Are we really being told the truth there? Is a massacre taking place instead! I want to know what is really happening to my brothers and sisters who for so long have lived under various authoritarian and sexist governments. I have been holding light over this entire world and complete equality, disclosure and advancement with no diasters happening. And no NWO will ever emerge. I would rather the sun supernova'd than that!


So I want some good news.



posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 10:25 PM
link   
May God be with them. These protests come from the heart, after eyes take in a world spoiled by corruption and economic policies shifting to benefit the already privileged.



posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 11:07 PM
link   
reply to post by desert
 


Are you all really supporting an Islamic Revolution? Do you support a new caliphate with Turkey at the helm? These issues are at stake.



posted on Jan, 30 2011 @ 07:59 AM
link   
reply to post by deessell
 


Pah. Fear-mongering.

Based on analysis from the corporate military industry.



posted on Jan, 30 2011 @ 08:06 AM
link   


In an unprecedented show of civil disobedience and open revolt, young Egyptians have clearly and forcibly delivered a message that is still resonating in the Middle East and North Africa: Authoritarian rule in the region is over.


Open "revolution" (which is actually Jihad) is always so calming on the population.

Egypt is slipping into a nightmare. Violent Jihad on the streets is never good. Cloaking it in western style buzzwords like "social change" not only conceals the Jihad but it makes the jihadists job easier. The Muslim Brotherhood thanks you.
edit on 30-1-2011 by mike_trivisonno because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 30 2011 @ 08:29 AM
link   
reply to post by soficrow
 




Egyptian Youth and New Dawn Hopes


Jazeera is really no better than any other media service. They merely present a different angle on the events... and if you approve of what is being said, then that will be the source you applaud.

In all of history, violent uprisings have only rarely led to better governments than those they destroyed. In Egypt today, the people, long held down by the current regime, follow in desperate hopes that it will be they who emerge victorious. Unfortunately, the engine that is quietly running this show... is masquerading as something that it is not, and has no intention of ever being.

This is a good example of wishing for something that you really don't want, but don't know it until it is too late to unwish it.

The current regime has been in power since Anwar Sadat was assassinated by Islamic extremists... and if this current unrest succeeds in toppling it, it will likely be an extremist Islamic government that follows. Those dreaming of democratic state will instead be blessed with Sharia law and something akin to what today exists in Iran.


edit on 30-1-2011 by redoubt because: typos



posted on Jan, 30 2011 @ 08:56 AM
link   
reply to post by redoubt
 



Jazeera is really no better than any other media service. They merely present a different angle on the events...


Precisely my point. I think it's important to view events from a variety of different angles.



...if you approve of what is being said, then that will be the source you applaud.


Your assumptions are showing.

I applaud Open Source, Open Access and pretty much anything that allows the individual to avoid manipulation, celebrate diversity and embrace difference - of opinion, sources, analysis and etc.





posted on Jan, 30 2011 @ 09:03 AM
link   
reply to post by soficrow
 




Your assumptions are showing.
I applaud Open Source, Open Access and pretty much anything that allows the individual to avoid manipulation, celebrate diversity and embrace difference - of opinion, sources, analysis and etc.


I assumed nothing. It was in fact just a general observation, not a comment on you personally. And I stand by that observation because that's just the way it is. Nobody is entirely immune. We gravitate to those things that we agree with and that agree with us. If Jazeera was saying what Fox News or the BBC were saying, you (or anyone else) may not be so inclined to cheer for them.

Personally, I don't trust any of them. I sift all the pepper shakers for fly turds.

Best



posted on Jan, 30 2011 @ 09:34 AM
link   
reply to post by redoubt
 



Jazeera is really no better than any other media service. They merely present a different angle on the events... and if you approve of what is being said, then that will be the source you applaud.

reply to post by redoubt
 




Originally posted by redoubt
reply to post by soficrow
 




Your assumptions are showing.
I applaud Open Source, Open Access and pretty much anything that allows the individual to avoid manipulation, celebrate diversity and embrace difference - of opinion, sources, analysis and etc.


I assumed nothing. It was in fact just a general observation, not a comment on you personally. And I stand by that observation because that's just the way it is. Nobody is entirely immune. We gravitate to those things that we agree with and that agree with us.


Al Jazeera is not THE source I applaud - it is an alternative source I consider imperative to consider. And at this point, perhaps the ONLY source that is presenting the voice of Egyptian people on the street.



If Jazeera was saying what Fox News or the BBC were saying, you (or anyone else) may not be so inclined to cheer for them.


It's not an either/or situation. It's this PLUS that PLUS here's another source, alternative to the analyses being pushed by the corporate military industry.



Personally, I don't trust any of them. I sift all the pepper shakers for fly turds.


Good plan. ...And watch out for the sneaky apologists who try to polarize every issue at the ground level, and prevent significant discussion.










edit on 30/1/11 by soficrow because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 30 2011 @ 11:51 AM
link   


Essentially, they argue, the reforms are tilted to the well-off and ignore the vast masses of the population — and Mr. Boutros-Ghali hasn’t done enough to help. That’s a common criticism in countries that started off as socialist, went through a wave of privatization of bloated industries to produce a leaner, more competitive economy — but one with low wages and scant social benefits.

source WSJ 2010

Those affected negatively by economic reforms (the "little people" as would be termed here) have had enough and are showing their anger and frustration. No doubt some, not all, members of the Muslim Brotherhood see this as a time to join in, but the protests are over the masses being negatively affected by reforms, NOT a social drive to implement radical Islam.

The Middle Class in America also were dealt a negative hand over the past three decades, as their wealth was sucked upward (that giant sucking sound was not just jobs leaving), but they at least had a chance to vote in a new govt every four years, hopefully not in rigged elections as the Egyptian citizen saw their Pres in effect as a pres-for-life. Americans suffer under a different type of govt corruption, one less notable at the polling place, but most notable with decisions made in Washington after influence by corporations.

Bottom line, "It's the economy, stupid!" can be translated into just about every language on this planet. Oh, and maybe a new line, "It's the corruption, stupid!"



posted on Jan, 31 2011 @ 05:02 PM
link   
reply to post by desert
 






Bottom line, "It's the economy, stupid!" can be translated into just about every language on this planet. Oh, and maybe a new line, "It's the corruption, stupid!"


And the corrupt who manipulate "the economy."



new topics

top topics



 
4

log in

join