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200 cow death solved?

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posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 04:44 PM
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Although many of the mass animal deaths reported around the world in the past month remain unexplained, officials have closed the case on the mystery of 200 cows that dropped dead in Wisconsin on January 14. A toxin from moldy sweet potatoes, which were a part of the animals' feed, are to blame for the bovines' seemingly strange demise


so they are slowly coming up with excuses for all of these deaths, one by one, do you buy the excuses?



While officials initially believed a virus such as infectious bovine rhinotracheitis (IBR) or bovine virus diarrhea (BVD) could have caused the 200 deaths at a Portage County farm, further testing revealed pneumonia to be the likely culprit, though such widespread cases of pneumonia are rare. The Wausau Daily Herald reports that the cattle's feed was then sent for testing, and the lab results from Friday revealed that a mycotoxin commonly occurring in moldy sweet potatoes, ipomeanol, was found to have triggered the pneumonia that caused the 200 cows to die.


link to excuse




posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 04:47 PM
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reply to post by matrix12
 


Thanks I`m now terrorfied to eat a Potato if thats what it did to a cow,holy cow



posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 04:49 PM
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reply to post by gringoboy
 


like the people didnt notice that the potatoes were moldy lol



posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 04:53 PM
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reply to post by matrix12
 


Awwh! I was banking on a Large secret group of Cow Tippers with gramaphones!



posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 04:54 PM
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reply to post by matrix12
 


Actually the standards for feed for livestock is by far and away more lenient than standards for human consumption. I spent a summer on a small farm and it was common practice to slop the pigs with what came out of the fridge on "clean out" day. Mold, odor, rot... all were overlooked. Livestock is much less picky about what they eat and they tend to tolerate things that humans cannot in terms of food being a bit "south".

In the original thread about this issue I actually stated I felt the cause would end up being bad feed, as it seemed the most rational deduction based upon the evidence and the symptoms the animals presented with.

I don't see this as a cover-up. I see this is validation that not everything happening today is somehow due to 2012, or Niburu, or the NWO, etc.

Sometimes bad things just... Well they just happen.

~Heff



posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 04:54 PM
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reply to post by TedHodgson
 


that would be more creative than moldy potatoes lmao



posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 04:56 PM
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reply to post by Hefficide
 


well i know my dog like smells stuff before he eats it to see if its safe, you would think cows would have that instinct
but you never know, i just find it odd that like two weeks after some incidents they come up with a cover up story that explains it all lol



posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 04:58 PM
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reply to post by matrix12
 
Aha!!Moldy sweet taters,........I hate when that happens



posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 04:59 PM
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im not saying for sure either way if this is indeed the answer for the deaths, jus leaning more toward bs
the info is there for you to decide, im going to do more research on cows instincts, ill be back



posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 05:04 PM
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Well, I do find that some of the mainstream explanations on a few of the mass animal deaths (usually surrounding smaller numbers of dead animals) seem to be logical. (And believe me, I am very skeptical on all things) A sickness contracted through moldy food killing 200 cows (very feasible...) Many of the fish deaths that occurred in low-level bodies of water (eg: rivers, small lakes...) explained away as low oxygen levels due to cold temperatures, also feasible...

Not all of these are connected. Also, how many people would even care about 200 dead cows if it wasn't for the mass amounts of animals deaths that have already occurred. Those animals picked a bad time to get sick and die, but that was all it probably was.

AS for the unexplained cases (burnt fish scales... liquefied insides). Your guess is as good as mine.

-Edit: Being the skeptic that I am, I would like to point out that I find it odd that all these sick cows would just drop dead on the same day, at the same time... Only a few days after 10,000 dead cattle in Veitnam... This doesn't mean I don't believe the "sickness" theory is wrong, but it does strike me as odd.
edit on 29/1/2011 by TheSparrowSings because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 05:13 PM
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i am having a hard time finding out if cattle can detect dangers in there food supply can anyone suggest a place to look foir the answer?



posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 05:28 PM
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About the fish dying because of a lack of oxygen..... cold water actually will hold more oxygen than warm.That is why trout are usually found in colder streams they need more oxygen that most other species.Being that I have raised and bred tropical fish for 40 years I thought I would pass this tidbit along.



posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 05:31 PM
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reply to post by matrix12
 


I agree with you , and i remember you saying it at the time.
star
edit on 29-1-2011 by rigel4 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 05:44 PM
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does anyone know a number to a cattle farm near you? i will call them and ask if cattle would detect bad potatoes
and see if we can debunk thier excuse or prove it either way.



posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 05:58 PM
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I've found some information about Ipomeanol, the toxin in question.

Interesting side note, this compound is being researched, apparently, as a potential cure for lung cancer.

A bit of implied evidence of it being problematic to cattle, at least sometimes, here.

~Heff



posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 06:51 PM
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reply to post by Hefficide
 


so its leaning more towards actual death, still wish i could find info on cattle instincts , just like a dog will not eat moldy bad leftovers you would think a cow would smell something bad also and not eat it



posted on Jan, 30 2011 @ 07:33 AM
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reply to post by matrix12
 


My wife is a farm girl and what happened here does happen, an accidental oversight by the rancher who overlooked the quality of his feed. She had an education in herd husbandry and kill offs at this scale does occur on occasion, a minor mention in the local paper normally.



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