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Pilot lands F-15 with only one wing (video from 2006)

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posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 08:53 AM
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I realize that this is a old video, but I just now saw it and thought it was pretty incredible. Just thought I would share it with any of the aircraft fanatics we might have around here! To fly a plane with one wing and land it as well? Someone had a angel or something on their shoulder that day.





posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 09:10 AM
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reply to post by onehuman
 


Now That requires some skill!



posted on Jan, 30 2011 @ 03:02 AM
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Originally posted by onehuman
To fly a plane with one wing and land it as well?
It's impossible. They said he wasn't flying it as a plane but rather as a rocket, and the fact that it had a wide body might have helped. Apparently I'm not the only one who wouldn't believe it if they didn't see it, the pilot also said if he knew the wing was missing, he would have ejected because he thought it's impossible with a wing missing too!

Pretty amazing feat!



posted on Jan, 30 2011 @ 03:26 AM
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www.arcforums.com...

Once during the Vietnam war I saw a picture of a Navy F-4 accidentally launched with both wings folded. Not sure how such a colossal screwup occurred, pace of ops, fatigue...but technically, F-4s can't fly like that. After the crew got over the shock, they made a safe landing as far as I know.

There are some birds that will get you home on half a wing and three cylinders or turbine blades, as the case may be, if you ask them nice.

If you scroll down about halfway on the link provided, there's a pic of an F-4 in flight with folded wings
edit on 30-1-2011 by apacheman because: add link



posted on Jan, 30 2011 @ 05:45 AM
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Part of it was the fly by wire computer system on the aircraft is built to stabilize the air craft with battle damage.

This caused the aircraft to try to correct using the split tail(stabilator) as a lifting surface.

As the plane tried to roll down on the missing wing side the stabilator on that side pitched up and the one on the good wing side pitched down stopping the roll.

With the ordnance loads jet attack aircraft carry under there wings the aircraft would go out of control when the pilot dropped the ordnance but for the fact that the fly by wire computers can compensate in milliseconds to the complete change in airflow patterns across the wings. The pilot only feels his plane get lighter with no change in pitch or yaw.

but with one wing it must have been pushing the limits of the fly by wire system computers to the edge.



posted on Jan, 30 2011 @ 09:01 AM
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Part of it was the fly by wire computer system on the aircraft is built to stabilize the air craft with battle damage.


edit: original post removed.

Interesting information on F-15 control system here:

www.f15sim.com...

Although it has electronics I'm not sure if it really has FBW... seems like it's hydro-mechanical but augmented hugely by electronics.
edit on 30/1/11 by C0bzz because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 30 2011 @ 02:06 PM
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Originally posted by apacheman
If you scroll down about halfway on the link provided, there's a pic of an F-4 in flight with folded wings
That's a pretty neat feat too, but at least it was intact, and somewhat symmetrical.

What's so astounding about flying with a missing wing is the asymmetry of the lift with only one wing. I would have thought no amount of adjustment to other control surfaces would compensate for that. And apparently they couldn't compensate at normal landing speed, I guess that's why he had to land going so fast.



posted on Jan, 30 2011 @ 09:11 PM
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Originally posted by C0bzz
...
Although it has electronics I'm not sure if it really has FBW... seems like it's hydro-mechanical but augmented hugely by electronics.


It is called "analog" fly by wire. Such aircraft have traditional flight control systems and hydraulic/mechanic steering cycle which are however not actuated by the movement of the stick itself but by signals first run through an electronic interface (not necessarily a computer).



posted on Jan, 30 2011 @ 09:35 PM
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If it had been a single engine aircraft there would have been no chance.

With the two engine, each one well outside of the centerline of the aircraft, the vertical stabilators and one remaining wing can provide enough lift that engine torque can play a key role. The F-16 is a fabulous aircraft, and the one I flew, but it would have been an automatic "eject, eject, eject!"

Still, a firm salute to that pilot!!!!



posted on Jan, 31 2011 @ 12:32 PM
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Originally posted by Arbitrageur

Originally posted by apacheman
If you scroll down about halfway on the link provided, there's a pic of an F-4 in flight with folded wings
That's a pretty neat feat too, but at least it was intact, and somewhat symmetrical.

What's so astounding about flying with a missing wing is the asymmetry of the lift with only one wing. I would have thought no amount of adjustment to other control surfaces would compensate for that. And apparently they couldn't compensate at normal landing speed, I guess that's why he had to land going so fast.


Yeah, I can imagine the chances of stalling out plus losing total control of the aircraft are insanely high with it's symmetry thrown off so badly.



posted on Jan, 31 2011 @ 01:12 PM
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When I was in the USAF pilots would refer to such events as having a high PF.

PF translates to "Pucker Factor", i.e., how tight your, ahhh, rectal orifice...clenched. This one would have been categorized as VHPF, necessitating removal of the seat cushions from the aforesaid orifices of the crew.



posted on Jan, 31 2011 @ 01:44 PM
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While stationed in Yuma AZ, during the 80s I saw a pilot bring in a A-4 with the back half of the plane gone.

On the A-4, to replace the engine, you split the bird in half, wings & forward fuselage in one piece, and the rear fuselage and vertical stabilizer in the back half. Engine in the middle.

There was a loud explosion as he lined up for landing and when he got it on deck, no back half of the plane.

Marine Major as I remember, he appraently carried them around in a wheelbarrow, if you get my meaning.



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