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How to tell when mushrooms have gone bad?

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posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 05:53 AM
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I'm talking about store-bought mushrooms, Pennsylvania Dutch or similar. I've already been schooled about the mistake of storing them tightly closed in plastic in the fridge - that's a no-no.

But I just came off a bout of food poisoning where the culprit had to have been the mushrooms. They were bought less than a week ago, and I used them in 3 dishes, usually 3 or 4 mushrooms sauteed in oil. Yesterday was not a fun day as I spent it in bed with a severely burning stomach.

So, how to tell when it's time to toss them?




posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 06:20 AM
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Former produce clerk here, with lots of experience and knowledge about store-bought mushrooms. You should throw them out if:


  • they become shriveled
  • they exhibit any mold
  • If they are small, if they have opened enough to completely release the stem
  • If they have been left out of refrigeration for hours
  • If they start to release a lot of other water

There is no way to see anything by eye if there is anything that will make you sick. It has to do with the way they are handled, usually before they show up in a store. One of the things that can help, is to dump them in a bowl of water, swish them to loosen any "dirt" (more about that in a moment), dump the water, then dry them with paper towels. You don't want them in water because they will soak it up which will water-down the taste.
If you are using them a few at a time, only wash the ones you will be using, and keep the others in the fridge. Because they don't sell ventilated plastic wrap ( all proper produce packaging wrap is ventilated so finely you can't see it), wrap the container with a paper towel and store in an open plastic bag.

Now for the dirt on mushrooms. Usually the growth medium is manure, sometimes loosened with perlite. The manure is composted and sterilized before use. It's sterilized so no nasty bacteria, mold or unwanted fungus grows where they want only mushrooms. Without the sterilization, the crop would be ruined. So it is sterile, but it is still poo. That's why there are mushroom brushes...any clumps or pieces come off better dry.
As to the food poisoning, it will usually hit you with throwing up, diarrhea, or both. And usually within hours of eating. If you were sick within hours of eating raw mushrooms, you might want to worry. Since you cooked them, it probably isn't food poisoning. Most recalls of produce you see are about using food raw, like sprouts, green onions, some salad mixes, etc. Or mushrooms used as garnish or on salad bars. I no longer eat sprouts myself. And I carefull wash everything. Even though they claim sliced mushrooms are washed and ready to use, I prefer to wash and slice my own. It is poo.



posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 06:52 AM
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Originally posted by stars15k
Former produce clerk here, with lots of experience and knowledge about store-bought mushrooms. You should throw them out if:


  • they become shriveled
  • they exhibit any mold
  • If they are small, if they have opened enough to completely release the stem
  • If they have been left out of refrigeration for hours
  • If they start to release a lot of other water

There is no way to see anything by eye if there is anything that will make you sick. It has to do with the way they are handled, usually before they show up in a store. One of the things that can help, is to dump them in a bowl of water, swish them to loosen any "dirt" (more about that in a moment), dump the water, then dry them with paper towels. You don't want them in water because they will soak it up which will water-down the taste.
If you are using them a few at a time, only wash the ones you will be using, and keep the others in the fridge. Because they don't sell ventilated plastic wrap ( all proper produce packaging wrap is ventilated so finely you can't see it), wrap the container with a paper towel and store in an open plastic bag.

Now for the dirt on mushrooms. Usually the growth medium is manure, sometimes loosened with perlite. The manure is composted and sterilized before use. It's sterilized so no nasty bacteria, mold or unwanted fungus grows where they want only mushrooms. Without the sterilization, the crop would be ruined. So it is sterile, but it is still poo. That's why there are mushroom brushes...any clumps or pieces come off better dry.
As to the food poisoning, it will usually hit you with throwing up, diarrhea, or both. And usually within hours of eating. If you were sick within hours of eating raw mushrooms, you might want to worry. Since you cooked them, it probably isn't food poisoning. Most recalls of produce you see are about using food raw, like sprouts, green onions, some salad mixes, etc. Or mushrooms used as garnish or on salad bars. I no longer eat sprouts myself. And I carefull wash everything. Even though they claim sliced mushrooms are washed and ready to use, I prefer to wash and slice my own. It is poo.


Thanks for the detailed reply -very informative.


I was told that slimy mushrooms should be thrown out also. What are your thoughts? These were definitely slimy.

I blame the mushrooms because they have been the common ingredient in meals over the past 3 days, where I got woozy and nauseous within an hour of eating them. The last time caused the burning stomach. Other things, such as burping up mushroom tastes mixed with a foul taste also made me suspicious.



posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 06:52 AM
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Doublepost oops.
edit on 29-1-2011 by mishigas because: doublepost



posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 07:11 AM
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With any food the risks are in the preparation and delivery, which can be blamed on the cook! LOL

Seeing I am the cook in the household I am typically the official "taster" as well, so if 20 minutes passes and I feel any sort of grumbling I quickly administer Colloidal Silver to my victims. I save them every time!

I have used old mushrooms before without any problems and have never given them much thought, but meat products are an entirely different story. Sure seems like things spoil quickly these days; I attribute this to what is in the air as I am constantly cleaning surfaces. I have also noticed that expiration dates on items from the store are getting shorter and shorter, as if their stock is running thin and they are not reordering correctly.

I just bought some Mayonnaise and put it in the cupboard, it has been less than a month and I reach in to find that the expiration date was expired three months ago! Either my Mayonnaise went through a time-slip or my grocery is getting very lax in their stocking; I had best start checking every item from now on as I have been lazy about checking everything.

Don't suffer yourself, get something that will kill those organisms and bacteria, get yourself some Colloidal Silver; I make my own. No sense in reaching the really sick stage when you can fight back!



posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 12:53 PM
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reply to post by mishigas
 


There are very few foods (well, at least in the Western world; Asians eat just about anything if you believe "Bizarre Foods") that "slimy" will be in the description as okay to eat. Slime is usually the product of bacteria, so throw anything slimy away. That is probably your problem. It's why the are kept loosely covered; the air allows them to remain "dry" and stops/slows down the decay processes.
It's amazing the amount of slime a produce department can make. It even makes different colors, from white, red, pink, and black, and all possible combinations of those. Especially under the water sprayers. When we had to clean them out, I could actually remove most of it in chunks with my hand up to a 1/2 full white bucket we would get from the bakery (I think they are 5 gallon). We usually cleaned them out while closed because it's not very pretty, and customers not familar with a grocery store don't know it's normal. And they are refrigerated cases, so the bacteria have to be pretty cold resistant.
It was not my favorite job, and they usually had the "men" do it because they had to use tools, something a woman doesn't know anything about. It always escaped everyone the tool kit they were using was my personal property, though. So riding the "woman can't use tools" bandwagon was okay by me!



posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 01:49 PM
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Originally posted by stars15k
If you were sick within hours of eating raw mushrooms, you might want to worry.


Thanks for the good info. Could you clarify on the quote above? You said "were sick". Does this mean there is something to worry about after the initial symptoms subside?



posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 01:54 PM
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Originally posted by Greensage
I quickly administer Colloidal Silver to my victims. I save them every time!


What dosage do you administer (ie: volume, concentration, particle size)?
edit on 29-1-2011 by dainoyfb because: of typo.



posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 04:04 PM
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Sorry OP I thought when reading the title of your post , that it was refering to us people as mushrooms as we are being kept in the dark about everything happening in our world are we not ?



posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 04:10 PM
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Originally posted by stars15k
reply to post by mishigas
 


There are very few foods (well, at least in the Western world; Asians eat just about anything if you believe "Bizarre Foods") that "slimy" will be in the description as okay to eat. Slime is usually the product of bacteria, so throw anything slimy away. That is probably your problem. It's why the are kept loosely covered; the air allows them to remain "dry" and stops/slows down the decay processes.
It's amazing the amount of slime a produce department can make. It even makes different colors, from white, red, pink, and black, and all possible combinations of those. Especially under the water sprayers. When we had to clean them out, I could actually remove most of it in chunks with my hand up to a 1/2 full white bucket we would get from the bakery (I think they are 5 gallon). We usually cleaned them out while closed because it's not very pretty, and customers not familar with a grocery store don't know it's normal. And they are refrigerated cases, so the bacteria have to be pretty cold resistant.
It was not my favorite job, and they usually had the "men" do it because they had to use tools, something a woman doesn't know anything about. It always escaped everyone the tool kit they were using was my personal property, though. So riding the "woman can't use tools" bandwagon was okay by me!


I chalked the sliminess up to improper wrapping while storing. I would wrap them tightly in a plastic bag and stick them in the fridge - I just assumed the slime was excess water vapor. I thought it was normal; I was wrong.

Someone mentioned colloidal silvers? What are they? I never heard of them.



posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 05:31 PM
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reply to post by dainoyfb
 


I make my own, I use two 12-volt batteries using .999 Silver; I suspend the Silver into Distilled Water for 15 minutes complete, no less, no more. I use 6 ounces per dose. Simple Simple, but I do recommend the highest percentage of pure Silver if at all possible, and never use tap water!



posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 05:42 PM
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reply to post by mishigas
 




How to tell when mushrooms have gone bad?


My old lady grows these things... for cooking and I was asking her how to ID a bad mushroom. Her reply was... when they start letting their pants sag and wearing hoodies in the summer... they done gone bad.

Bout fell out of my chair.

She went on to say to watch for a slimy film that develops on them... that happens just before they get bad.



posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 05:47 PM
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Mushrooms as food for survival purposes ?

Throw them all out and fill up the space you want to use wit real food as mushrooms are hardly nutritious at all.



posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 05:48 PM
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If you eat them and you die, I guess that's a way to tell they are bad. Unfortunately, you'll just serve as a bad (or good) examples for the others.

HTH!



posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 06:21 PM
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Originally posted by Sinter Klaas
Mushrooms as food for survival purposes ?

Throw them all out and fill up the space you want to use wit real food as mushrooms are hardly nutritious at all.


You are stating this as fact. Source please?

Here's mine.
Mushrooms are good for you! Know why?



posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 06:31 PM
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reply to post by stars15k
 


I don't really care that much for mushrooms (have them in a salad now and then) but after your post I want nothing to do with them. Same as you I gave up sprouts years ago.
edit on 29-1-2011 by crazydaisy because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 06:36 PM
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Store your mushrooms in brown paper bags - not plastic - and wash the ones you're going to use. I would never use mushrooms that have gone slimey.



posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 10:03 PM
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reply to post by dainoyfb
 


Murshrooms for survival ? This is why


Zero Fat
Low Calories
Low Carbs
Low Sodium
No Cholesterol


Who cares about vitamins when there is a food shortage...



posted on Jan, 30 2011 @ 10:47 AM
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Originally posted by stars15k
Former produce clerk here, with lots of experience and knowledge about store-bought mushrooms. You should throw them out if:


  • they become shriveled
  • they exhibit any mold
  • If they are small, if they have opened enough to completely release the stem
  • If they have been left out of refrigeration for hours
  • If they start to release a lot of other water


and when their slimy is a big no no


There is no way to see anything by eye if there is anything that will make you sick. It has to do with the way they are handled, usually before they show up in a store. One of the things that can help, is to dump them in a bowl of water, swish them to loosen any "dirt" (more about that in a moment), dump the water, then dry them with paper towels. You don't want them in water because they will soak it up which will water-down the taste.
If you are using them a few at a time, only wash the ones you will be using, and keep the others in the fridge. Because they don't sell ventilated plastic wrap ( all proper produce packaging wrap is ventilated so finely you can't see it), wrap the container with a paper towel and store in an open plastic bag.

Now for the dirt on mushrooms. Usually the growth medium is manure, sometimes loosened with perlite. The manure is composted and sterilized before use. It's sterilized so no nasty bacteria, mold or unwanted fungus grows where they want only mushrooms. Without the sterilization, the crop would be ruined. So it is sterile, but it is still poo. That's why there are mushroom brushes...any clumps or pieces come off better dry.
As to the food poisoning, it will usually hit you with throwing up, diarrhea, or both. And usually within hours of eating. If you were sick within hours of eating raw mushrooms, you might want to worry. Since you cooked them, it probably isn't food poisoning. Most recalls of produce you see are about using food raw, like sprouts, green onions, some salad mixes, etc. Or mushrooms used as garnish or on salad bars. I no longer eat sprouts myself. And I carefull wash everything. Even though they claim sliced mushrooms are washed and ready to use, I prefer to wash and slice my own. It is poo.



posted on Jan, 30 2011 @ 12:31 PM
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reply to post by Sinter Klaas
 


I know that when the food runs out in my pack I'll be happy to get what I can find, especially healthy foods packed with vitamins and fiber. I don't know what things are like in the Netherlands but mushrooms are plentiful and varied here. I guess in the end we can all survive the way we each see fit.





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