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Iran Sees Rise of Islamic Hard-Liners

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posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 12:03 AM
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Iran Sees Rise of Islamic Hard-Liners


www.nytimes.com

TEHRAN — Hopeful that the protests sweeping Arab lands may create an opening for hard-line Islamic forces, conservatives in Iran are taking deep satisfaction in the events in Tunisia, Egypt and Yemen, where secular leaders have faced large-scale uprisings.

(visit the link for the full news article)


Related News Links:
www.haaretz.com
www.rferl.org

Related AboveTopSecret.com Discussion Threads:
The Enemy of My Enemy
Poll: Arab majority believes nuclear Iran helps Mideast
edit on 1/29/2011 by ~Lucidity because: (no reason given)




posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 12:03 AM
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Finally some word out of Tehran.

He made it clear that he hoped that the “anti-Islamic” government of Zine el-Abidine Ben Ali, who was ousted in Tunisia, would be replaced by a “people’s government,” meaning one in which conservative Islamic forces would gain the upper hand, as they did when Iranian people overthrew Shah Mohammed Reza Pahlavi, establishing a quasi-theocracy.


On the other side are the United States and France, he said, who are “doing everything they can to ride the wave and prevent the people from establishing the regime that they desire.”

As expected...nothing too shocking or unexpected here. At least not that I can see at this late hour, but I'm sure you guys will see things I'm not seeing. Interesting that the spokesperson mentioned only the U.S, and France. Trying to keeps things calm.

They're definitely looking at this as an opportunity to establish stronger influence in the ME. I've linked to a thread called "The Enemy of My Enemy" that has a pretty overview of the shifting political climate in the Middle East that started about half a year or so ago. This well could be part of the reason that we're seeing all the activity we're seeing there now.

Also added links to a couple of other outlets reporting this because it's always good to get several perspectives.


www.nytimes.com
(visit the link for the full news article)
edit on 1/29/2011 by ~Lucidity because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 12:11 AM
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reply to post by ~Lucidity
 


I wonder why removing an oppressive regime that let it's people starve while they lived like jet setters, must be replace by Hardline Islamists??

Why does the West always spin this line?
Seems there's never any middle ground in their eyes...

Could a new Government not care for it's people more, share the wealth and let them practice moderate religion??



posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 12:12 AM
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It will definitely be something to watch.



posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 12:13 AM
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reply to post by ~Lucidity
 


I wonder how Iran feels about the guy that they say could take charge. The IAEA guy, The nobel prize guy. (forgot his name).

I know Iran had some problems with the way the IAEA treated them.



posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 12:19 AM
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reply to post by backinblack
 

Always black and white, right? Why do you think the West always spins it like this? Doesn't the goal seem to be getting into Iran? And look what news outlets are reporting it this way. Who does it benefit?


reply to post by mayabong
 

Oooo interesting connection. You mean Mohammed ElBaradei?

Could Egypt's ElBaradei Be A Hero Of The Revolution?

Thanks for bringing it up!
edit on 1/29/2011 by ~Lucidity because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 12:25 AM
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reply to post by ~Lucidity
 


Here's one of many articles where he says Iran is trying to build a bomb.

EDIT: actually I dont know if he's saying that. Still doesn't seem very nice.

www.reuters.com...
edit on 29-1-2011 by mayabong because: (no reason given)

edit on 29-1-2011 by mayabong because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 12:26 AM
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reply to post by ~Lucidity
 


NYtimes' biased assessment of these revolutions is predictable. Obviously a US media source will back the puppet fascist dictators.

The way they portray the news is insane the least, they are trying to call those protesting against fascist regimes, hard-line Islamists, who in the Western brain equates to Al-Qaeda.

Ofcourse Iran is happy, it isn't just Iran, it is most of the world. There has been demonstrations through out the world, from Turkey to New Zealand. We are happy because the people of those oppressed nations have stood up against fascist puppet dictators who represent Zionists/US, instead of the people.

Why won't US call for Democracy in Egypt? Why won't it call for Democracy in Tunisia? In Algeria? In Oman? In Saudi Arabia...

I will tell you why, because Democracy doesn't bring forward a leader who represents the United States of America. That is what US wants, puppets, it is not like the US hasn't assassinated or topple Democratically elected governments, to replace with fascist dictators.

No one takes US seriously anymore, after half a century of deceit, there's no doubt left in humanity's mind regarding US agenda and foreign policy.
edit on 29-1-2011 by reatarded because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 12:27 AM
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reply to post by mayabong
 


His name is El Baradei... and here's what he had to say about Iran's ``nuclear program`` a few days ago in Germany :

Ex-IAEA chief says west 'hyping' Iran nuclear threat: report

The West is "hyping" the perceived nuclear threat from Iran, the former head of the UN atomic watchdog Mohamed ElBaradei said in an interview Tuesday.

"There's a lot of a hype in this debate," ElBaradei told the Austrian news agency APA.

The Egyptian-born diplomat, who headed the International Atomic Energy Agency for 12 years until November 2009, pointed to a US intelligence report released in 2007 which suggested Iran had indeed been working on a nuclear weapons programme but abandoned it 2003.

"This assessment is still accurate today," ElBaradei said in comments reproduced in German.


So you figure it out.



posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 12:29 AM
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reply to post by Vitchilo
 


Cool thanks for the info.



posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 01:02 AM
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The reality of the matter is that the protests are happening because of the people's dissatisfaction with their current regimes. However, just like the Iranian revolution of 1979, this chaos creates an opportunity for the Islamic hard-liners to take control.

In fact, most people who I spoke to that took part in the protests against the Shah of Iran had no intentions of putting the country in the hands of the Islamic regime. It just happened to turn that way and now most of those people regret that outcome.

Unfortunately it seems that the odds are stacked against a real democracy prevailing as result of these protests.
edit on 29-1-2011 by endlessknowledge because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 01:11 AM
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reply to post by endlessknowledge
 


People can choose Democratically what and who should govern them. If they want to be governed Islamicly, that is up to them. That is the reason why the West does not want Democracy, because Islam and politics is mingled. If there is Democracy in a Muslim country, people would most likely choose an Islamic system, and a Muslim leader who represents the people rather than the West, or the Zionists.

Which statistics have you read, which claims most Iranians regret the rise of Islam in Iran/or the revolution? If you haven't noticed by now,, majority of Iranians are Muslim.



posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 01:29 AM
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Originally posted by reatarded
reply to post by endlessknowledge
 


People can choose Democratically what and who should govern them. If they want to be governed Islamicly, that is up to them. That is the reason why the West does not want Democracy, because Islam and politics is mingled. If there is Democracy in a Muslim country, people would most likely choose an Islamic system, and a Muslim leader who represents the people rather than the West, or the Zionists.

Which statistics have you read, which claims most Iranians regret the rise of Islam in Iran/or the revolution? If you haven't noticed by now,, majority of Iranians are Muslim.


First of all, Islam and democracy are like water and oil. They just don't mix. That might be the reason why there are very few Islamic countries that have a true democracy. In fact, Turkey would be the only country that comes to mind and they are more secular than anything.

Secondly, just because Iran has a majority Muslim population does not mean they would want an Islamic regime. The US might have a Christian majority and yet I'm sure most don't desire a Christian regime. Like I mentioned earlier, I have not read statistics but rather spoken to people from Iran( ie family, friends ect.) who have directly told me so. Take it for what its worth.



posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 01:37 AM
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Originally posted by endlessknowledge


First of all, Islam and democracy are like water and oil. They just don't mix. That might be the reason why there are very few Islamic countries that have a true democracy. In fact, Turkey would be the only country that comes to mind and they are more secular than anything.

#1. True Democracy? What is true Democracy?
#2. When I say Democracy, I simply mean the people having the right to choose who should govern them, and what their constitution should be.

Let me elaborate

To me, Democracy is having the right to choose. If the United States of America wants to become Communist, it should be allowed, the government of the United States of America and its laws represents its people's will.

The government of Egypt and its laws should represent the people's will, not the US or Israel's will.

If Egyptians want an Islamic system, then they should have the right to choose. That is Democracy from my perspective. You tell us what Democracy is from your perspective.



Secondly, just because Iran has a majority Muslim population does not mean they would want an Islamic regime. The US might have a Christian majority and yet I'm sure most don't desire a Christian regime. Like I mentioned earlier, I have not read statistics but rather spoken to people from Iran( ie family, friends ect.) who have directly told me so. Take it for what its worth.


Your words VS millions of Iranians. I speak Farsi by the way.



posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 01:37 AM
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Better the devil you know than the one you don't.

Re Egypt: another reason why the US should had stayed out of Egyptian business. All I see is another Islamic regrime like Iran replacing Mubarak. And for what? So the Americans can bully another nation? Or is this another intentional move to purposely bring Middle Eastern nations closer to war?

Does'nt Obama and his administration have enough on their plates at home? Obama's widely publicised speech just went down the gurgla! What did Obama say? something to the affect It's time to unite as one? Wrong. America has two kinds of people - it's citizens and those who control them or else.



posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 01:50 AM
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Originally posted by reatarded

Originally posted by endlessknowledge




Secondly, just because Iran has a majority Muslim population does not mean they would want an Islamic regime. The US might have a Christian majority and yet I'm sure most don't desire a Christian regime. Like I mentioned earlier, I have not read statistics but rather spoken to people from Iran( ie family, friends ect.) who have directly told me so. Take it for what its worth.


Your words VS millions of Iranians. I speak Farsi by the way.


I agree wholeheartedly that it is up to the people of a sovereign country to choose their government, but the whole point of the Greens was democracy and establishing a secular government (maybe not Mousavi's hope, but the people's, certainly). How many who wanted a theocracy vs how many wanted a secular government- that debate could go on indefinitely. Sooo many people have given their lives for the hope of freedom in Iran. I guess Khomene'i thinks he can just kill them all off and things will be hunkey dorey. (they won't. It is only a matter of time)



posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 01:56 AM
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reply to post by reatarded
 


To me democracy is not just about who you choose to rule you but rather having freedom to live your life as you choose. For example, having freedom to choose your religion, freedom to wear what you want or simply the freedom to speak. These are just a few examples of choices that Iranians don't have and the 2009 protests were a good example of the fact that people don't want to be ruled by the Islamic regime.

Bottom line is that majority of people realize that all religions are just a tool for control and that is what they don't want. They don't want to be controlled by religious ideology or western propaganda. Simple as that. But unfortunately those are the main elements in power today.



posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 08:20 AM
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reply to post by bluemirage5
 

If the U.S. and France had a hand in this, what I'd like to know is how. I've seen the news about that one college student, but seriously? How would someone coordinate protests and revolts in this many countries? And how will the chosen leaders be picked?



posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 08:56 AM
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posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 09:34 PM
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reply to post by Vitchilo
 


Vitch the article quotes el baradei as saying the Iranis ARE building a bomb in 2009 jun 17....thats what he said anyways....




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