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Egypt: Be Careful What You Ask For!

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posted on Jan, 28 2011 @ 06:18 PM
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Western human rights groups are crowing and cheering that Egyptians are about to taste "freedom." Everyone is clapping and cheering. Don't be so sure. Western groups are talking to Egyptians who speak English, who tend to be democratic reformers, but it would do well to remember Iran. The same thing happened there where the Muslim extremists encouraged that interpretation and only ran up their flag after the fact. Surpirse! That's not freedom unless you think stoning women for adultery or wearing western clothes is a good thing and hanging anyone who professes to be a Ba'hai represents freedom for people. It could be that the Muslim Brotherhood or the jihadists are behind some of this unrest, but since none of the MSM or NGOs speak Arabic, they'll never know until it is too late.

If the same thing happened in Egypt, we'd be screwed and another step closer to WW III. The entire balance of power would change and with someone like Obama in power here, who is seen by the rest of the world as weak and inexperienced, this cannot be a good thing.

The unrest in Egypt is not confined to the streets. The ongoing issue has been for some time who would succeed Mubarak. It was taken as a given that it would be his son, Jamal, but in the last year the military has opposed that move. This has led to unrest within the ruling party and the military. The street unrest is an outgrowth of THAT unrest. The reason is that Jamal is not a military man. His father was a general in the Air Force. Anwar Sasdat came out of the military and so did Nassar. Right now Mubarak is old and ailing and he doesn't even have a vice president in place.

The bottom line is that Mubarak has got to go, sooner rather than later, and a member of the military will succeed him, for stability's sake.

P.S. I was in Cairo in November and stood in the square where the demonstrations are now taking place.




posted on Jan, 28 2011 @ 06:21 PM
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These are mostly young people and Islamic radicals pushing their buttons.

Idiots.

Almost stupid with the berserk state of mind these folks can work themselves into.

This can get really nasty quick.

And spread.

The law of unknown consequences is a bad thing to mess with.



posted on Jan, 28 2011 @ 06:24 PM
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Originally posted by schuyler
Western human rights groups are crowing and cheering that Egyptians are about to taste "freedom." Everyone is clapping and cheering. Don't be so sure. Western groups are talking to Egyptians who speak English, who tend to be democratic reformers, but it would do well to remember Iran. The same thing happened there where the Muslim extremists encouraged that interpretation and only ran up their flag after the fact. Surpirse! That's not freedom unless you think stoning women for adultery or wearing western clothes is a good thing and hanging anyone who professes to be a Ba'hai represents freedom for people. It could be that the Muslim Brotherhood or the jihadists are behind some of this unrest, but since none of the MSM or NGOs speak Arabic, they'll never know until it is too late.

If the same thing happened in Egypt, we'd be screwed and another step closer to WW III. The entire balance of power would change and with someone like Obama in power here, who is seen by the rest of the world as weak and inexperienced, this cannot be a good thing.

The unrest in Egypt is not confined to the streets. The ongoing issue has been for some time who would succeed Mubarak. It was taken as a given that it would be his son, Jamal, but in the last year the military has opposed that move. This has led to unrest within the ruling party and the military. The street unrest is an outgrowth of THAT unrest. The reason is that Jamal is not a military man. His father was a general in the Air Force. Anwar Sasdat came out of the military and so did Nassar. Right now Mubarak is old and ailing and he doesn't even have a vice president in place.

The bottom line is that Mubarak has got to go, sooner rather than later, and a member of the military will succeed him, for stability's sake.

P.S. I was in Cairo in November and stood in the square where the demonstrations are now taking place.






Unless you live over in Egypt, what you say can be taken with a grain of salt.

They are jobless, homeless, and staving.

That is what is fueling the unrest, and the same things will be coming to America, and to all countries of the world.



posted on Jan, 28 2011 @ 06:26 PM
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I have to agree that radical islamists are likely inciting this in order to have another avenue of attack against Israel. This reminds me of 1979 all over again, with another Carter in office. Only this time we have no Reagan in the wings.



posted on Jan, 28 2011 @ 06:35 PM
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I am careful of what I ask for. The fact that I am asking for this kind of response from We the People in the US is something I asked for long ago but have lost hope that the sedated masses would do.

Once the bread and circuses are gone, we'll see if the people rise to the occasion.



posted on Jan, 28 2011 @ 06:36 PM
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Originally posted by sonofliberty1776
I have to agree that radical islamists are likely inciting this in order to have another avenue of attack against Israel. This reminds me of 1979 all over again, with another Carter in office. Only this time we have no Reagan in the wings.


Yes it has nothing to do that they are broke, starving, and have been under emergency rule (marshal law pretty much) for the last 30 years.

P.S. Yes how dare the Iranians overthrow a government that was installed by the west. Operation Ajax anyone?



posted on Jan, 28 2011 @ 06:40 PM
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reply to post by schuyler
 


IRAN



posted on Jan, 28 2011 @ 06:55 PM
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I would rather live and die in a chaotic world of uncertainty than to live and die in a orderly world of tyranny.

How about you?



posted on Jan, 28 2011 @ 06:56 PM
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At this point anything can happen and any group or strong individual may gain control.

If the Muslims gain control Israel will have them as an enemy again.

But, if operatives have time and can re-organize choosen forces with money and arms from the Gov'ts of USA, Russia, or China, then one of them may create an establishment with puppet leader/leaders will be brought back into the fold of spewing worthless talk and in the end the same old repressions will be re-installed.



posted on Jan, 28 2011 @ 07:02 PM
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I'm all for letting israel and muslims work their problems out by themselves. I think america should stay out of both sides, stop funding both sides, and chill out.

Maybe we'd have more friends in the world.



posted on Jan, 28 2011 @ 07:03 PM
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If the current Egyptian government forms will create a power vacuum in the country.

Some power will rush in to fill that vacuum. (Though rival powers may squabble for awhile over the spoils).

There are any number of options - it could be the military, it could be a democracy, or it could be a radical Islamic regime.



posted on Jan, 28 2011 @ 07:05 PM
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Egypt is one of US it's greater allies in the middle-east and thanks to Mubarak there is a peacetreaty with Israel.
If Mubarak is going to fall will both then end or what? It is just a thought. Israel might get a new enemy.



posted on Jan, 28 2011 @ 07:05 PM
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Originally posted by Frogs
If the current Egyptian government forms will create a power vacuum in the country.

Some power will rush in to fill that vacuum. (Though rival powers may squabble for awhile over the spoils).

There are any number of options - it could be the military, it could be a democracy, or it could be a radical Islamic regime.


The suspense is killing me. (gets popcorn)



posted on Jan, 28 2011 @ 07:13 PM
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reply to post by mayabong
 


Heh - the thing about is you have to figure there are an untold number hands stirring the pot behind the scenes to try and make it all work out in their own interests. Besides the current Egyptian government, there's been talk of US involvement, I'm sure Israel is in there as well, likely Iran, various Islamic groups of running from mainstream to extreme, I would be surprised is China and / or Russia hasn't tossed a few chips in the game too.

Round and round she goes...where she stops - nobody knows!



posted on Jan, 28 2011 @ 08:25 PM
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ETA: S & F

reply to post by Frogs
 


That's a fair assessment.
We don't know who is really pushing the most. I posted this video and article earlier on another thread. The reporter was standing in front of a masque so one could assume there is a fair bit of religious provocation going on as well.


This will get a whole lot of flack but, I'm sure they're in there helping the people mix it up.
Just like the West was helping mix things up in Tehran a while back. Tit for Tat

How Are The Protests In Egypt, Tunisia's Jasmine Revolution Being Viewed In Iran?

"The Islamic world is ripe with major new developments and Khomeini's Islam is the engine of these events," Iran's hard-line daily "Kayhan" wrote in a January 27 commentary devoted to the recent wave of protests in the Arab world.

The daily, which often reflects the views of the Iranian establishment -- or more specifically, Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei -- added that the third millennium is witnessing "the powerful [presence] of Islam under Iran's leadership."

edit on 28-1-2011 by SLAYER69 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 28 2011 @ 08:37 PM
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Man, i guess this is really a case of "wait and see" i mean it seems innocent enough when American forces liberated Kuwait in 91 people started an uprising against Saddam until it was brutally repressed. Only history and hindsight will look to the future now and tell us what can/is/would've been



posted on Jan, 28 2011 @ 09:57 PM
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Originally posted by DutchBigBoy
Egypt is one of US it's greater allies in the middle-east and thanks to Mubarak there is a peacetreaty with Israel.


You sure about that?

Anwar El Sadat

The Egyptian–Israeli Peace Treaty was signed by Anwar Sadat and Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin in Washington, DC, United States, on 26 March 1979, following the Camp David Accords (1978), a series of meetings between Egypt and Israel facilitated by US President Jimmy Carter. Both Sadat and Begin were awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for creating the treaty.


ETA: Even though Mubarak was VP during the time of the treaty, and was involved in some of the meetings between diplomats and leaders on the issue, I see no evidence that he was anything but loyal to Sadat and his policies, and has continued those policies not only because they are profitable to Egypt, but also because they're back the League and have no good reason to pull out now.
edit on 28-1-2011 by 00nunya00 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 28 2011 @ 10:36 PM
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reply to post by schuyler
 


Could be.

But that's not your call to make. I'd rather that the Egyptian people have the chance to self-determination and pick someone I might detest, than to have some fascist like yourself trying to call the shots for them.



posted on Jan, 28 2011 @ 10:38 PM
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reply to post by muzzleflash
 


Muzzleflash, if you and I agreeing about middle east issues isn't a sign of the apocalypse, it damn sure should be



posted on Jan, 28 2011 @ 11:43 PM
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reply to post by schuyler
 


They can stop this revolt by building a Holocaust Museum for the Egyptian people. This ploy works in the U.S.



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