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Help A Noob Build A Solid Camping Gear Kit....On $1000.00

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posted on Jan, 28 2011 @ 08:46 PM
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reply to post by hotbakedtater
 


Speaking as a Boy Scout leader you "need" the following and can get it for under $1,000.

1) Survival knife.



Cost : $14.95 (includes shipping)

Contains :

The knife handle is hollow and contains: matches, wire-ring saw, fish hooks and leads, nylon fishing line and needles.

The watertight screw-on cap is a liquid filled compass.

The back edge of the knife has saw teeth and bottle opener, and can be used as a signal mirror. Length is 11.62" and weighs 9.2 ounces.


Benefits : Multi-function tool, contains more items in less space, easily replaceable items if used for more than one camping trips, you can water-proof matches if not already water-proofed.

2) Rucksack



Cost $131.95 (shipping not included)

Contains :

•1,000 denier water and abrasion resistant, lightweight ballistic Nylon fabric
•DuPont® Teflon® fabric protector for grime resistance and easy maintenance
•YKK® #10 high strength zippers and zipper tracks
•UTX-Duraflex Nylon buckles for low sound closures
•Triple Polyurethane coated for water resistance
•High tensile strength Nylon webbing
•High tensile strength composite Nylon thread (stronger than ordinary industry standard nylon thread)
•#AS-100 high grade closed-cell foam padding material for superior shock protection
•Internal seams taped and finished
•Paracord zipper pulls
•Stress points double stitched, bartacked or "Box-and-X" stitched for added strength
•A row of sewn hard points in the front allows users to attach additional Maxpedition® pouches and accessories with the "snap and anchor" modular expansion system using TacTie™.
•Hydration system compatible with up to a 100 oz. bladder (bladder not included)
•Hydration system pocket with zipper opening, a reservoir hang-tab and a VELCRO® bi-directional drink tube port
•Y-shaped retention strap helps maintain the shape and integrity of the bag and can be used to hold a coil of rope
•Removable 1" nylon webbing loops at the bottom can be used to tie a sleeping bag or a tripod
•5 rows of PALS webbing per side for full MOLLE compatibility
•2 rows of PALS webbing on front pocket for full MOLLE/ALICE compatibility
•2 quick release compression straps per side
•Internal silent keyper in front pocket
•High visibility organizer in lower front pocket (inside Black variant only)
•Non-slip, high abrasion-resistant bottom
•1" sternum strap and 2" integrated belt for support
•MAIN COMPARTMENT DIMENSIONS: 20.5" x 16" x 7.5"
•FRONT POUCH DIMENSIONS: 15.5" x 12" 2.75"
•SLIP POCKET DIMENSIONS: 15.5" x 12"
•CAPACITY: 2,810 cu. in. (46 liters)


Benefits : Multi-function use, can be torn apart with knife and used as extraneous survival gear (example extra tether, tournaquet, gurney (with strong log/sticks), also large capacity to carry more items.

3) Tent (not the one I would use, this is 6-person tent)



Cost : $229.99 (shipping not included)

Contains :

See website for more details


Benefits : Sleeps up to 6 people, can be used for multiple purposes.

4) M.R.E. - Meal-Ready-to-Eat



Cost : $78.99 (shipping not included)

Contains :

•Case of 12 - 11 x 5 1/2" meal packs (Heater included)
•Includes 3 each of the following assorted entrées: Chicken with Noodles, Chicken Pasta Parmesan, Vegetable Beef Stew and Beef Chili with Beans
•May also include the following: Crackers, Instant Coffee, Fruit Bar, Gum, Sugar, Salt, Pepper, Matches, Spoon and Towelette
•Sealed in heavy plastic


Benefits : Sealed packages (think bears in the woods), water-proof.

5) Scouting membership

Cost : Check your local Council/District (usually no more than $20-$25 a year membership)

Contains : More training per cost item, high value, low cost.

Benefits : Cross-gendered, family fun, family values, networking, leadership.

6) Merit Badge Book - Camping

Cost : $4-$5 (look for e-books, cheap/free)

Contains : Camping values, camping instructions, survival values.

Benefits : Teaches camping techniques.

7) First-Aid Kit



Cost : $74.95

Contains :

•Pocket mask
◦Flexible silicone construction that will remain pliable in cold temperatures
◦Intuitive application - no previous instruction is required prior to its deployment
•Latex gloves - An important addition to recent kit designs, as it allows a rescuer to work safely in an area that is contaminated with another persons body fluids. Characteristics include;
◦Durable construction for deployment in cold conditions
◦Textured fingertips for added dexterity when environment is slippery
◦Hypoallergenic and powder free
•Paramedic shears - for cutting through seat belts, and to permit visualisation of a patients body. Characteristics include;
◦Rugged construction - high force design -able to cut soft metals up to 1 millimetre thick
◦Serrated blades
◦Safety tips
•Hot and Cold Packs - Chemically activated packs to provide warmth or cooling to critically ill patients. Characteristics include;
◦Rugged package which is resistant to bursting when pressurised either mechanically, or from the chemical reaction occuring within the device
•Triangular bandages - Characteristics include;
◦Color fastness in material
◦Heavy weave which is made of absorbent 100% cotton
◦Individually packaged in light plastic wrapping
•Roller gauze of a heavy 100% cotton weave, 24" long, excellent color fastness, and very little breakdown of material upon application. Each roll individually wrapped in a light plastic to preserve its readiness.
•Abdominal Pads - Absorbent pads of 100% cotton for managing patients with heavy traumatic bleeding. Individually wrapped in either paper or plastic to preserve readiness and sterility.
•Weather sheet - A light aluminum sheet which is large enough to cover one patient, and protect them from wind and precipitation. It is made from reflective material that is easy to spot from aircraft.
•Tongue depressors - wooden or plastic, approximately 5" long, 1" wide. Used as splints in traumatic hand or feet injuries.
•Splint - Light aluminum mesh construction for a combination of strength and flexibility with a light foam coating to insulate patient from the material o 4" x 24", folded in three layers to a completely flat presentation.
•Alcohol swabs - 1"x 1" swabs soaked in alcohol and individually packaged.
•Tensor Bandages - 24" long by 3" wide. Elastic cotton material, individually wrapped in either paper or light plastic.
•Cloth adhesive tape 1"
•4" x 4" gauze pads - non-sterile, bulk.
•Elastoplast bandage strips.
•Elastoplast knuckle bandages.
•Pen light - light weight, disposable.
•Printed sheet of instructions, warnings and warranty information.
•Critical Action Card - laminated card approximately 4"x6" with step by step instructions detailing how to manage sick and injured patients.


Benefits : Life-saving gear.

Boy Scouts : International : Survival : All Scouting Organizations

...and...

Going To Your Public Library, Gathering Open Source Intelligence, and Surviving

Good luck.




posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 11:18 AM
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i would recommend a goretex bivi bag and poncho for out in the sticks. less to carry on distance and quicker than erecting a tent. i have had my bivi bag for nearly 20 years now and it is as good as the day i procured it. the poncho can be strapped between trees or rocks with bungees and with a decent sleeping bag inside the bivi bag it is toasty and warm down to -20.
f



posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 09:13 PM
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For some of your supplies i would recomend that you check out Ozark Mountain.They have much of the same gear that coleman carries but at a far less price. I have used there laterns and cook stoves with no problem. Also if you are going to be car camping you can get a less expensive backpack for day hikes. Me and my girlfriend spent a month in Co. hiking almost every day and only used a small day pack. ( roughly 20 bucks) If you are not a large family I would suggest a dome tent as they are easier to set up/



posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 09:22 PM
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If I were you, I would worry about predators, both human and animal. (Kyote, ferrel dog [or raccoon] pack, couger, serial killer/rapist or robber. Try to get mace.



posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 09:47 PM
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Originally posted by David134
For some of your supplies i would recomend that you check out Ozark Mountain.


Ozark mountain?.........
Don’t you mean Ozark trail?
The walmart brand?

Overall, they are a collection of products from various manufactures put under a privet label. The thing is finding out who actually made them when you want to find parts.

They are usable overall. The only problem I have had with that brand is the propane related appliances. Nothing dangerous, just an annoyance resulting from their design. If you notice, most Coleman propane operated equipment has an active regulator where it maintains constant output when the outside temp and tank pressure change. The Ozark mountain equipment I have, just has a needle valve. So, if it is real cold when you light it, you have to turn the valve almost all the way open to get good light/heat. When the tank warms up from the heat given off by the lamp/stove, then it will really get cranking in a few minutes, to the point that you have to crank it way down.



posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 10:06 PM
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Car camping? Easy.
  • Get a 4 person (or more) tent. Even if it's only you, it's nice to have the extra room and the extra weight of the larger tent doesn't matter since you are bringing it by car.

  • Get a comfortable camping chair. So you can read books, watch birds, sit and fish, watch the stars, stare at the campfire. After a long day of hiking around, you'll want a nice chair to sit in.

  • Get a large cooler. The more variety of food you bring, the more enjoyment you'll have.

  • Get an air mattress, with a cheap electric (car lighter powered) pump. The better night sleep you get, the more you'll enjoy your camping trips.

  • Since you are car camping just bring lots of blankets and normal pillows. It's more comfortable than a sleeping bag.

  • Get at least one good lantern (LED electric are the easiest way to go now days). Two is better.

  • Get a good, powerful headlamp. Splurge on this item because you will use it a lot and will dislike having a weak light source if you are gathering wood or whatever at night.

  • Get a decent set of binoculars. You'll want to be able to scope out animals, mountain peaks, and the moon & stars!

  • If bugs and mosquitos are active, bring citronella candles and lots of bug spray, and if it's really bad, get a head net.

  • Bring a small shovel to dig cat holes for relieving yourself, and don't forget toilet paper!

  • Get a comfortable pair of hiking shoes or boots.

  • Get high quality rain gear and bring extra tarps in case the weather gets bad or to block the hot sun.

  • Get cord or string to hang the tarps.

  • Bring an axe for chopping wood, or bring a good wood saw.

  • Bring sunblock! (don't forget the bug spray!)

  • Bring a map and compass of the general area - it's good to be familiar with your surroundings and fun to identify the various places and things you see.

  • Lastly, bring a good book


edit on 29-1-2011 by harrytuttle because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 10:32 PM
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Originally posted by Skewed
Read the book "When all hell breaks loose" by Cody Lundin. He gives a common sense approach to setting yourself up such a kit. A good portion of the stuff out there is overpriced and ultimately the result of the greed mongers out there producing stuff that is a waste of money and designed by people that have never even been camping.
I can recommend cody's book:

"98.6" also. it keeps things real simple.: Survival anywhere is:broken down into an easyto remember rule of of "3's:"
You can go 3 seconds without thinking:
3minutes without air:

3hours under exposure to the harshest environment.
3days without water
3weeks without food.
so your priorities are (1)dry shelter and warmth; (2)water and lastly (3)food.
You first priority is to keep your core body temp at 98.6 degrees.
Your sleeping bag becomesyour personal portable environment.buy a good one for each person inthe party.
down is most expensive,"loftiest", warmest, litest to carry and compacts down the smallest but if it getse wet it loses its"loft" and warmth. and becomes useless until it drys out again.

Synthetics are cheaper, heavier and bulkier, but retain their loft ( dead air space) when wet so retain some warmth.
A tent is to keep your stuff dry. a cheap tent traps moisture from your breathe and
can cause a problem.
tarps strung properly cam be warmer and drier than a tent because the improved air flow moves moisture out and away.Tarps are the minimalist and ultralite packers friend but take some experience/experimentation.and suck bigtime in "bug country" during warmer seasons. Hammock camping is big up north as good ones ( Hennesy's) have attached bug netting and allow you to string up anywhere there's trees. You can leave no trace pretty easily.



posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 11:20 PM
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reply to post by Mr Tranny
 


thank you for the correction. It is trail not mountain. Still i have had good luck with them so far.



posted on Jan, 30 2011 @ 12:33 AM
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reply to post by David134
 


In case you ever need help/parts, here is two of the companies that make Ozark trail stuff.

North pole LTD
www.northpoleltd.com...

www.northpoleltd.com...

They make the tents, sleeping bags and stuff.

Blue Rhino..
www.bluerhino.com...

www.bluerhino.com...

They make the stoves and lanterns.

edit on 30-1-2011 by Mr Tranny because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 30 2011 @ 03:23 AM
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Originally posted by SpartanKingLeonidas
reply to post by hotbakedtater
 


Speaking as a Boy Scout leader you "need" the following and can get it for under $1,000.

1) Survival knife.



Cost : $14.95 (includes shipping)

Contains :

The knife handle is hollow and contains: matches, wire-ring saw, fish hooks and leads, nylon fishing line and needles.

The watertight screw-on cap is a liquid filled compass.

The back edge of the knife has saw teeth and bottle opener, and can be used as a signal mirror. Length is 11.62" and weighs 9.2 ounces.


Benefits : Multi-function tool, contains more items in less space, easily replaceable items if used for more than one camping trips, you can water-proof matches if not already water-proofed.



Really? A survival knife? Its bad steel, but the weight of it makes you think you have a real knife. There is a reason it costs under 15 bucks. A good piece of flint and a rawhide sack is far superior to this thing. Buy a survival knife, and die.

This is still the survival forum right? lol Oh, I'm back.



posted on Jan, 30 2011 @ 04:53 AM
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Originally posted by salchanra
Really? A survival knife? Its bad steel, but the weight of it makes you think you have a real knife. There is a reason it costs under 15 bucks. A good piece of flint and a rawhide sack is far superior to this thing. Buy a survival knife, and die.

This is still the survival forum right? lol Oh, I'm back.


Yes, really, a survival knife.

Not one place there did you ever see me state this would be a permanent knife.

Nor did you ever see me tell you what to do if the blade broke and or how to replace it.

Again, you also did not see me suggest, yet, to change out the blade, before it breaks.

The original poster asked about camping, not about "survival camping", there is a complete difference.

Yes, this is the Survival Forum, and you did not come up with a better example.

Other than flint and rawhide.

Which is a caveman solution.

The original poster wanted to buy camping equipment and for cheap.

Under $1,000.

If I wanted to suggest a $300 knife I would have.

Notice also how I never said anything about knife fighting?

Or about using it against a bear.

I could have suggested a book on Krav Maga too but I did not.

As well I could have suggested a good hunting rifle or a compound bow.

But I left a few things for others to suggest instead.

How about suggesting a good or better solution instead of criticizing other people's suggestions.

My reply is in a direct reply and about your behavior not your statements.

Deny Ignorance.
edit on 1/30/11 by SpartanKingLeonidas because: Adding Depth and Insight Into the Post Because Replying To Rude People Often Takes Longer.



posted on Jan, 30 2011 @ 09:30 PM
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I have to agree

They were wanting something that was going to be used for normal day to day camping. If it breaks, then they could just get a new one. And when you are going to be using it for occasional light camping, even the cheapest stuff will usually do fine. We are not talking survivor man stuff where it has to be durable because you can’t get a replacement if it breaks.

And even if we are talking survivor man stuff, which do you think he (les stroud) would prefer to spend a limited budget of 50 bucks on?

Option 1A high quality exo razor thingamajig knife.

Option 2 cheep survival knife with a compass, matches, fishing line, hooks, and wire saw. A couple lighters. A small pan and water bottle. A tarp. A small stove and fuel. A small LED flashlight.

Given the options, which would you think he would prefer to take into a survival situation?
Which would you prefer?

If buying cheap will get you what you need to do what you want to do on a limited budget, then good. It may not be the best. A knife may not hold a knife edge under heavy use, and require occasional sharpening. A light or stove may be temperamental. But most likely, they will do what you need them to do for as long as most people will use them.

We are not talking about a fantasy world of limitless budgets, we have to take into account real world realities when we give advice.



posted on Jan, 30 2011 @ 10:26 PM
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reply to post by Mr Tranny
 


I have to assume you directed your comment about my knife suggestion.

Thank you.

An unlimited budget?

I wouldn't buy the cheap piece of crap I suggested nor would I rely upon it for more than camping.

Survival?

I would have suggested a titanium bladed knife with a full tang that could easily slit someone's throat.

In the dead quiet of the night like whispering death.

Secrets Of Street Survival - Israeli Style: Staying Alive In A Civilian War Zone




Amazon Review :

Learn the secrets the Israelis have gleaned from years of prevailing in hostile territory.

Israeli self-defense and small arms specialist Eugene Sockut presents hard-learned survival tactics, including adopting the right mind-set, using "hot" and "cold" weapons, securing your home and surviving a riot.

For academic study only.


I could have suggested that book.

Special Forces Close-Quarter Combat Manual




Amazon Review :

This is the manual used to train the BATF assault force that conduced the tragic raid against the Branch Davidian compound in Waco, Texas.

A provocative foreword by Jim Pate proves the murky and possibly illegal use of this manual to train law enforcement personnel, as well as the ominously changing role of the BATF.

Study this manual and learn how federal troops go about the business of "law enforcement" with full military intent and force.


Or perhaps this one above.

But, seeing as this was a simple "camping" thread, in the Survival Forum, I digressed.

Go figure.

edit on 1/30/11 by SpartanKingLeonidas because: Adding Depth and Insight Into the Post.



posted on Jan, 30 2011 @ 10:33 PM
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Um, wow - I thought "we" were talking car camping in the state/national parks, here. If we're going to start discussing survival and close quarter combat/fighting then I have a few things to add to my earlier list, I would venture...



posted on Jan, 31 2011 @ 03:27 AM
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Originally posted by LadySkadi
Um, wow - I thought "we" were talking car camping in the state/national parks, here. If we're going to start discussing survival and close quarter combat/fighting then I have a few things to add to my earlier list, I would venture...


What can I say but one word to reply to that LadySkadi?

Testosterone!



It happens.

Especially during "Survival" discussions, even during camping, threat of death or not.

We're past it.

My replies when criticized can come across as defensive.

Even if they are not.

I prefer being critiqued over being criticized anyway.




Be sure and remember the camouflage and minimize its use.

edit on 1/31/11 by SpartanKingLeonidas because: Adding Depth and Insight Into the Post.



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