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5 Myths of Challenger Shuttle Disaster Debunked: (see whay you think you know/or don't!)

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posted on Oct, 1 2012 @ 04:15 AM
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This picture, released by the presidential commission that investigated the Challenger tragedy, shows fragments of the orbiter flying away from the explosion on Jan. 28, 1986, 78 seconds after liftoff. The top arrow shows the orbiter's left wing. The center arrow shows the orbiter's main engine; and the bottom arrow shows the orbiter's forward fuselage. Investigators suggested that some of Challenger's crew members may have survived the explosion itself but died in the fall down to Earth.


source :
shineyourlight-shineyourlight.blogspot.be...




posted on Oct, 1 2012 @ 05:06 AM
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You could argue about the semantics of the word "explosion", but what's clear is that there was no detonation. That is, there was no combustion of all the hydrogen and oxygen from the external fuel tank. Rather, the tank disintegrated and the fuel turned into a huge vapour cloud. People on the ground didn't hear an explosion, for them the sound of the rockets simply stopped. If the fuel detonated, there would be an almighty bang, and the crew compartment would be destroyed.

The process of disintegration was a complex one, but one part of it is that the SRB that had flames leaking out of it swivelled into the external tank, pushing the whole stack off course. This created enormous airdynamic forces on the stack.

Seconds prior to the disintegration, strong winds pushed the Shuttle off course, and the main Shuttle engines worked frantically to correct the course. This is often overlooked, but it undoubtly contributed to the disaster. Had there been no such wind shear, the O-ring might have held until SRBs were spent and discarded.

www.e-education.psu.edu...
www.youtube.com...

edit on 1-10-2012 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 4 2012 @ 05:41 PM
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For anyone interested, I just got to the bottom of the matter with the "vehicle has exploded" quote that led so many people to believe that the Challenger exploded. The utterance, by the NASA public affairs officer Steve Nesbitt, was in response to the following events:

T+110.250
Range safety control officers send radio signals that detonate the self-destruct package on right-hand solid rocket.

T+110.252
The left-hand booster self destructs.

T+2 min 25 sec
FIDO: "Flight, FIDO."
Greene: "Go ahead."
FIDO: "RSO (range safety officer) reports vehicle exploded."

Nesbitt then says: "We have a report from the flight dynamics officer that the vehicle has exploded. The flight director confirms that."

But that is a misquotation. "Vehicle exploded" refers to the controlled destruction of the two SRBs, to prevent them from possibly causing damage when they fall. This is the job of RSOs, to explode the rockets in the event of malfunction. en.wikipedia.org...

spaceflightnow.com...
edit on 4-10-2012 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 4 2012 @ 07:57 PM
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Originally posted by wildespace
People on the ground didn't hear an explosion, for them the sound of the rockets simply stopped.

Indeed, that's one of the things that I remember about that experience very vividly.


Seconds prior to the disintegration, strong winds pushed the Shuttle off course, and the main Shuttle engines worked frantically to correct the course. This is often overlooked, but it undoubtly contributed to the disaster. Had there been no such wind shear, the O-ring might have held until SRBs were spent and discarded.

www.e-education.psu.edu...
www.youtube.com...

edit on 1-10-2012 by wildespace because: (no reason given)

Fascinating video, thanks, first time I've seen that one.



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