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California Residents Hit With Government Ban On Paying By Cash

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posted on Jan, 28 2011 @ 03:50 PM
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reply to post by DimensionalDetective
 


Here in Florida, along our turnpike, there are sections of Palm Beach County where you cannot exit the turnpike unless you have the pre-pay toll system we call "SunPass" (I believe those of you in the northeast DC-NY corridor may call something similar "EZPass"). You purchase the sensor that you put on your windshield. You refill it online....sounds convenient, and they make it cheaper than paying with coins and dollars at the tollbooth.

However, I find it odd that there are literally exits where you cannot pay with cash. We're talking ritzy areas of West Palm Beach. You cannot get off at that exit unless you have the right set-up to pay for tolls. My thought is, is this a precursor to the new gated community. Everything is automated, you cannot go in unless you have automated clearance.

Pretty nutty stuff.




posted on Jan, 28 2011 @ 03:50 PM
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reply to post by Xcathdra
 


First of, most card owners pay some kind of fee's to have credit with a company.

Secondly most card owners own multiple cards ie. visa, mc, Amex etc. So loss to business is not true. The CC companies do charge 2-3% on purchases towards the business.



posted on Jan, 28 2011 @ 03:56 PM
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Originally posted by MMPI2

this is absolutely correct. i wonder what's gonna happen when an enterprising sort out there decides to point out, with a court injunction backing them up, that cash is "legal tender for all debts, public and private."



you're right, if a person refuses to accept cash, like you pointed out, since it is legal tender for all debts, then by refusing it they are breaking the original term of the contract and forfeiting compensation for the service they have provided.



posted on Jan, 28 2011 @ 04:30 PM
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reply to post by DimensionalDetective
 


This note is legal tender for all debts public and private.

If they refuse to accept cash the debt is absolved I believe.



posted on Jan, 28 2011 @ 04:31 PM
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reply to post by usernameconspiracy
 





OK, so I just tested your theory (that it is the law of the land you can pay cash) and I put a random DVD into my cart at Amazon.com. According to your theory, there should be an option for me to send them cash in the mail for the purchase. I'm going to assume you already understand that Amazon, an American company with distribution centers all over the United States...wait for it...does NOT ACCEPT CASH as a form of payment.


If you were to arrive in person to pay with cash they would be bound to accept it. For obvious reasons, cash is discouraged by mail. (just had a photography customers check stolen from the mail this week actually and it was just a check)

This does not mean that you couldn't arrive at their doorstep and pay with cash. Go ahead. Try it. There's a difference between denying payment by cash and not accepting cash by mail. There is a legal difference as well.
edit on 28-1-2011 by pirhanna because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 28 2011 @ 04:33 PM
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"this move is in response to local residents being uncommonly antagonistic to local government"

well this is certainly a way to appease people that don't like the job your doing, next week they will burn a mock constitution in effigy of your rights.



posted on Jan, 28 2011 @ 04:37 PM
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If this ends up really being a major change across the country, I guess the cool thing is we never really have to pay anyone back ever again - we can just get one credit card with whatever limit on it, buy some stuff with it, then get another one to pay back the first one with... I mean, if we're not allowed to use cash how are we supposed to pay the credit card companies back?



posted on Jan, 28 2011 @ 04:40 PM
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reply to post by Adlai
 
that is my point first it is large sums $2,500, so we all get use to this.
Now i don't know of any one that would have $2,500, in cash, on them but then why can not?Why can you not pay in cash that much??
Simple they the GOV can not track the person that spent it, payed for it, what ever it is car, house payment, or to buy a boat ect.ect.
Have you not seen this NO CHECKS, and some places NO CASH, CARD ONLY.
This is just the start to see how we, the people will take it, well i am use to seeing it, dealing with it for i do not have a card to use cash only, well i am finding that it is getting harder when they the cashier, soon to be called "card handler lol" has to count out my nickles dimes and penny's.


edit on 28-1-2011 by bekod because: word corection and added info



posted on Jan, 28 2011 @ 04:45 PM
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This is simply insane and the fools are either using "sheep language" with their bogus excuses or ..... I don't know....


I phoned the Town of Discovery Bay asking a few questions. The clerk who answered didn't think this was a big deal

In my questioning she added they aren't the only one's who will refuse cash. She mentioned Mountain House Community Service District already refuses cash. Finally, after too many questions I guess, she asked me who I was. Long story short, the General Manager will be calling me on Monday.

I then phoned Mountain House Community Service District. The clerk said they have never accepted cash. After a few questions it is my understanding MHCSD is a "special district" of San Joaquin Valley community and not governed the same as Discovery Bay. The refuse cash for safety purposes.

My confusion is this:
When requesting a copy of anything that is public record ( in Florida), you must show an I.D. regardless of what you are requesting. The I.D. is documented then you pay for the copies.
Is this procedure too complicated for the CDS Board?


"When we got anonymous requests, we don't know if people are going to come in and get this stuff or not pick them up," he said. "If it never gets picked up, we don't have any recourse to contact them."

Humm, asking for a contact number would be too much? What about refusing to give any information over the phone?
Regardless if the "general manager" returns my call or not, I plan on speaking with someone from the CDS Board.
My first question will be "How is this not against the law?"
When we finish, I will explain to him how easy identity theft is here in the good ol U.S.A.

Peace
SL

S&F DD



posted on Jan, 28 2011 @ 04:54 PM
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reply to post by Xcathdra
 


Actually I don't think it is illegal unless you owe a debt! A business or public service can refuse to take any payment of any kind unless you are not billed in advance for the service or good. Only creditors must accept cash if it is presented as payment on a debt is my understanding of the "law". I think the water company would have to accept the payment because you are billed for water usage after you use it so a water bill would be considered a "debt". As far as the permits go they would have the right to only accept whatever payment they wish be it credit/debit, berkshares, or chicken bones.

"According to the 'Legal Tender Statute' (section 5103 of title 31 of
the U.S. Code), 'United States coins and currency (including Federal
Reserve notes and circulating notes of Federal Reserve banks and
national banks) are legal tender for all debts, public charges, taxes,
and dues.' This means that all U.S. money, as identified above, when
tendered to a creditor legally satisfies a debt to the extent of the
amount (face value) tendered.

However, no federal law mandates that a person or an organization must
accept currency or coins as payment for goods or services not yet
provided."



posted on Jan, 28 2011 @ 04:59 PM
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In case anyone hasn't seen this yet.
Aaron Russo died just as he was gaining momentum.

I recomend starting at timestop 2:06


David Grouchy



posted on Jan, 28 2011 @ 05:06 PM
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No business is required to accept cash as payment:

From the US Treasury:


The pertinent portion of law that applies to your question is the Coinage Act of 1965, specifically Section 31 U.S.C. 5103, entitled "Legal tender," which states: "United States coins and currency (including Federal reserve notes and circulating notes of Federal reserve banks and national banks) are legal tender for all debts, public charges, taxes, and dues."

This statute means that all United States money as identified above are a valid and legal offer of payment for debts when tendered to a creditor. There is, however, no Federal statute mandating that a private business, a person or an organization must accept currency or coins as for payment for goods and/or services. Private businesses are free to develop their own policies on whether or not to accept cash unless there is a State law which says otherwise. For example, a bus line may prohibit payment of fares in pennies or dollar bills. In addition, movie theaters, convenience stores and gas stations may refuse to accept large denomination currency (usually notes above $20) as a matter of policy.



posted on Jan, 28 2011 @ 05:18 PM
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reply to post by usernameconspiracy
 


"nobody uses cash anymore" That's actually what the bank manager told me when I attempted to cash a $5700 check. she then proceeded to tell me they didn't have that much cash on hand and made me return the following morning to get my Money.

I haven't had a bank account in 10 years ( had a couple that I left $100 or so in and then one day get a quarterly statement stating I owe them money for "maintenance charges"). So it's been cash only for me ever since. I have yet to resort to dealing only in "precious metals' but that's only due to the inconvenience of it.



posted on Jan, 28 2011 @ 05:18 PM
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reply to post by davidgrouchy
 


Thanks for sharing that video. It makes a lot of sense to me. Just last week I was researching the high speed rails since it might be built here in Florida. I looked up a private company who might be building it. This company is known world wide and it was eerie, lol and Rockefeller is tied into it quite nicely of course.
"The world is our family" (paraphrasing the video).... scary times right now imo.

Peace
SL



posted on Jan, 28 2011 @ 06:02 PM
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reply to post by Time2Think
 


Come on SHEEPLE, you all making a huge fuss out of nothing, seriously! Here's my points: First, to the above poster, YOu can use your DEBIT card which is linked to your CHECKING ACCOUNT, which acts like CHECK payment. Just because it is a CARD doesn't mean its a credit card.

Money goes with technology. First we had bartering, then we realized how produce and shape metals and so we all had coins, then the printing press came along, and soon after we had paper money. Well now we have digital 1's and 0's, and are able to make magnetic strips on cards, and so that is the majority of payments now. Pretty soon, we will be using our smart phones as payments (stated earlier in the thread). I am all for removing CASH altogether. (it's more green for the envirnment too.. do u know how many old bills get burned up??) I think alot of the people against this are people over 40 yrs old, that don't realize how useful alot of this technology is. When you carry cash, you have to carry enough for your travel, or you have to stop by a bank to get more out. HELLO, with debit cards, you NEVER have to go to an atm or bank, you have unlimited access to your CHECKING. So now when you are out shopping a grocery store and only have $20, you can actually buy more food if you have the money in your checking account. Also, paper money make theft easier. PLEASE carry around hundred dollar bills, and watch how quickly you either accidently LOse the bill, or get jacked. With cards, if your wallet gets stolen, or something, One call, is able to cancel the card, and track the criminal. Simple. get with the times geezers, paper money is a thing of the past, like VCR's, Cassettes, horse drawn carriage, newspaper print, gas engines, etc.



posted on Jan, 28 2011 @ 06:05 PM
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Originally posted by LanMan54
reply to post by DimensionalDetective
 


As I've noted in other places, there is a concerted effort underway to do away with using physical instruments of payment such as cash, coins, checks, etc.. Digital cash, or electronic money, is coming whether you like it or not. So to are biometric and RFID 'innovations'. Won't be long and you will not be able to access the internet without it. Just a matter of time.


Get thee behind us satan.

But thanks for the warning anyway.



posted on Jan, 28 2011 @ 06:17 PM
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Wow thats scary and crazy at the same time.



posted on Jan, 28 2011 @ 06:24 PM
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If all cash is to become illegal (along with gold, silver, etc.) and only electronic cash/debits are legal, then it will be much easier for the Fed/Banking system and Gov't to manipulate those sums and you. Then that will only be the beginning that will go far beyond the Brave New World.



posted on Jan, 28 2011 @ 06:38 PM
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reply to post by DimensionalDetective
 




to depict those who use physical money as potential terrorists

Oh, so I guess the super rich morons that shift massive amounts of cold hard cash under the table are like super-terrorists? Yeah...I thought so...


edit on 28-1-2011 by WhizPhiz because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 28 2011 @ 06:49 PM
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reply to post by DimensionalDetective
 

Without getting too deep into the article, the main title brings up a pretty cool idea. Since California is filled with illegal aliens, (people who use cash only), changing the state's currency will drive off criminals. Maybe we should be switching the whole system, so that everyone gets paid through a direct deposit. When it comes to buying a specific product, (food, water, clothes, etc...), the only way to pay for it is through the use of a government secured pay-card. Other words, the current government currency is replaced with another government currency, which is secured, backed up, and maintained by the 'government'.

It is an interesting concept.

Regardless about what the currency looks like, (dollar/credits,etc...), the value of such means for trade will still be government controlled, maintained, and circulated. What do you think the dollar is? Its government backed currency. What is looks like does not mater. What is important is that it has value.

If it prevents illegals from getting paid, I have no problem with changing the currency.
edit on 28-1-2011 by Section31 because: (no reason given)



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