It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Strange light kills thousands of fish in Colombia

page: 7
72
<< 4  5  6   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 07:20 PM
link   
I can't see any evidence here to connect the fish deaths to some random light in the sky. As a previous poster pointed out here, it's difficult if not impossible to correctly gauge the distance of a light in the night and at distance.

If anything, the scant evidence here suggests to me that these two events were probably not connected.

I know from my own experience of studying/observing meteors (which are essentially "lights in the sky"), that people often make claims that they have seen a bright meteor, and that it "came down just over the hill", or "fell on to my neighbors" property... you get the idea.

The trouble with making this claim is that in the vast majority of cases, this is impossible, and in the remaining cases (which are all extremely rare events - so rare none have been recorded in human history) anybody seeing such an event, where a meteorite actually hit Earth close to them (within a few miles) would probably be blown off their feet. It takes a very large rock to punch through our atmosphere with enough size to keep it going, and for a meteor to stay luminous, it has to be traveling at a very high speed (a few Km/s).

In other words you would know it if you really did see a meteorite fall close by. The truth is that our atmosphere is very good at stopping very big rocks, and most meteorites occur as a result of large meteoroids smashing into the lower (and thicker) layers of atmosphere and exploding, and the larger remaining fragments falling down to the ground unseen during what is known as the "dark flight" stage.

This FAQ explains most of the concepts involved here

The point I'm trying to make here is that it's not out of the realm of possibilities that what they saw falling apparently into the swamp was actually a long way off. The evidence is so sketchy that it's impossible to be sure what it was, although there is good evidence to suggest what they saw may have been a meteor.

Firstly for the reasons given above (we know meteors are good at fooling our senses), and secondly because we know meteors can make sounds which people hear at the same time as seeing the meteor. Here's another page on the subject from NASA.

As for the fish being found dead/burned, Columbia is pretty much a free for all when it comes to environmental pollution. It could just be that someone polluted the swamp with chemicals that burned the fish. As I recall coc aine labs tend to base themselves near a fresh water supply, and then discharge some highly caustic chemicals back into the water. That would be my guess based on the little evidence we have here.




posted on Feb, 9 2011 @ 02:25 PM
link   
Wonderful stories.

So an alien being from another planet lit up the water and killed the fish. And it's not in major news.



new topics
 
72
<< 4  5  6   >>

log in

join