Breakthrough promises $1.50 per gallon synthetic gasoline with no carbon emissions

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posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 07:12 PM
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Originally posted by C0bzz

www.guardian.co.uk...


lf l'm not completely mistaken you didn't get the point that this is not about hydrogen fuel cell-powered cars? lnstead this is a completely new type of hydrogen fuel we could use in conventional combustion based cars. Or lf l missed your point please correct me.

l agree with you that you still are required to generate the Hydrogen by ether using fossil fuels, garbage, or electrolysis from water so this would not solve our energy problem at all. But it would solve many other financial problems that come with the diminishing of fossil fuel. Not everybody in the world has the money for a new electric car, let alone a new electric heating installation. And in 3rd world countries a lot of small businesses run on conventional combustion engines [fisher men etc]
edit on 29-1-2011 by gnostician because: (no reason given)
edit on 29-1-2011 by gnostician because: (no reason given)
edit on 29-1-2011 by gnostician because: (no reason given)




posted on Jan, 30 2011 @ 02:22 PM
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I haven't read this whole thread but this article from Science Daily goes right along the same lines.

Cheap, Clean Ways to Produce Hydrogen for Use in Fuel Cells? A Dash of Disorder Yields a Very Efficient Photocatalyst



posted on Jan, 30 2011 @ 04:08 PM
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$1.50/gallon gas would solve a lot of economic problems right now. Which means we'll never see it. Betcha this is another story that won't make it mainstream. Even when they do, nothing comes of them. Who remembers the Bloom Box?

www.cbsnews.com...



posted on Jan, 31 2011 @ 09:22 PM
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This is great news overall, but unfortunately I dont really see us switching to this technology any time soon. I remember when we found a way to run cars on water, and now these vehicles are in museums?! My point is that the oil companies of our governement are so high up the chain I dont see them allowing this to be integrated into mainstream society quite yet. A more realistic approach as far as our government is concerned would be a slow transition to this technology. I just don't see the bigwigs of the oil industry throwing up their hands and saying, "go ahead, you win." I dont think these guys are gonna let this new source of fuel get too far. In my opinion, and Im sure most, this is a very dissapointing outlook but realistic as well. It would be great if next year I go to my local mini mart and fuel up with these "complex hydrides" paying $1.50 per gallon, saving hundreds a year, but I dont see it happening any time soon.

Think of how much this would benefit not only humanity, but our mother earth, no more oil spills, thousands of tons less CO2 in our atmosphere, more green in our pockets. Im known as an optimist but in this world, Im learning more and more who's really runnin the show. Im also curious as to where they are getting these complex hydrides, how is the ratio between supply and demand, how long does it take, what other reprecussions on the environment does this source have (sp?) etc. Look, if we really want to stop using gas, we can right now! I live in the Northwest and there is a city about 25 miles from my home that has a place that will convert your car to take biodeisel fuel at 85 cents a gallon, and im sure thats the case in most cities, but then again growing these veggies that make biodeisel (except recycled of course) has other negative affects on this earth such as room to grow crops, soil degradation etc., So its really up to us if we want to change/a change, us as individuals.



posted on Feb, 1 2011 @ 03:52 AM
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Originally posted by fiftyfifty
Hmmm.. not wanting to be too skeptical but how much energy is required to produce this stuff? It's usually the case that more energy is used in production than in burning the fuel it's replacing. Fingers crossed for a revolution


this stuff just looks really fishy to me, I've heard theories of bacteria producing oil, so they can farm it? and never really run out. Also stanley meyers got murdered or whatever, you should look at his work, he had some new invention the water hydrogen splitter which basically sucks water in and spits out HHO, then he dies suddenly.

Then maybe 30 or 50 or whatever years later they come out with some offshoot version for the public that still puts the money in their pockets.

Another example of this is the story of Nikola Tesla...and his wireless electricity for all plan...and it got demolished. And suddendly a few years ago harvard announces a discovery on wireless electricity...but working on it, which is how to limit the range and keep track of energy transmitted so the electric companies can pocket your money too. I think they use it for cell phones or nintendo wii controllers now actually....


My guess is, they will obviously say your car needs to be retrofitted for this new gas, they will retrofit the water splitter spark plugs, and all this new gas is really going to be is mostly plain water and probably some lubricants or whatever.....water is 2 parts hydrogen and 1 part oxygen and oxygen is necessary for combustion anyways.
edit on 1-2-2011 by intj123 because: (no reason given)


it also just crossed my mind that 1.50 per gallon is about the same as drinking water we buy. How would they possibly afford to give us more for so cheap?
edit on 1-2-2011 by intj123 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 3 2011 @ 12:16 AM
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As long as what it's made from is abundant and easily accessible and they can be mass produced easily with little energy input. Otherwise you may have to spend more energy than you get which is stupid.



posted on Feb, 6 2011 @ 09:49 AM
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reply to post by intj123
 


I was curious too. this is obv a hypothetical assumption.

however, with this method, we can erase all money spent on oil exploration and recovering that oil.
Correct me if im wrong, but doesnt a majority of oil go into looking for other oil and extracting it? I know its a good %



posted on Feb, 6 2011 @ 10:06 AM
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reply to post by VonDoomen
 


Its all about generating the electricity. If you have a cheap clean way to do that a lot of the other problems go away (e.g. Polywell fusion etc)

If we switch to this stuff it wouldn't remove the need to extract oil. Its still needed in the chemical industry to make other products. No oil means no plastic (and numerous other things we rely on to make our tech work). It would stop us needing to burn the stuff and make our supplies last much longer into the future (hopefully to the point we don't need it anymore).

If electricity is cheap enough you can turn the existing plastic back into a form of oil to extend supply even more.



posted on Feb, 6 2011 @ 10:25 AM
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reply to post by justwokeup
 


however, we could also replace oil/paper industry with industrial grade hemp.

basically anything you can do with oil, you can do with hemp 100 times cheaper and cleaner!
its to bad we dont use this amazing plant



posted on Feb, 6 2011 @ 10:44 AM
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reply to post by VonDoomen
 


Appreciate a link to that if you've got one.

First time i'd heard of hemps potential as a petrochem substitute in manufacturing. You learn something everyday



posted on Feb, 6 2011 @ 02:14 PM
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reply to post by justwokeup
 


just woke up, you may find this info rather maddening.

A website I found maybe 5 years ago talked about this -v cant find the link right now
the green hemp car project showed that, if we converted 6% of our landmass to growing/harvesting industrial hemp, we could replace our need for oil/gas in cars. That would equate to about the size of delaware or something like that? Their campaign was basically driving a hemp powered car across the US.

hempcar.org
Henry ford built one of the first model t cars almost entirely out of hemp. And it ran on hemp oil too!
"Ford recognized the utility of the hemp plant. He constructed a car of resin stiffened hemp fiber, and even ran the car on ethanol made from hemp. Ford knew that hemp could produce vast economic resources if widely cultivated."



posted on Feb, 6 2011 @ 02:43 PM
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reply to post by VonDoomen
 


Thanks for that. Interesting stuff to be sure. That topic is worthy of its own thread.

Some more food for thought. Cheers.



posted on Feb, 9 2011 @ 11:07 PM
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reply to post by VonDoomen
 


Yeah, probably Exon Mobil, Chevron, or some hotshot will buy this and we will never hear about it again. They dont want to loose their profit! If it is cheap to make that would be awsome! It is good to hear people are being innovative and looking for new fuels. My only concern is it it is good for the environment. Are there any different byproducts than CO2, H20 or CO such as in Gasoline combustion?





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