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Frogs, A Celebration

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posted on Jan, 26 2011 @ 04:48 PM
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Just wanted to bring some beauty and diversity from our natural world onboard. I am amazed at the colors of these creatures. Not only are they beautiful to admire, but they are very important to our ecosystems as well.
Some of these poisonous dart frogs are deceptively attractive, because just a minute portion of their venom can paralyze and kill.

Chemicals extracted from the skin of Epipedobates tricolor may be shown to have medicinal value.[19] One such chemical is a painkiller 200 times as potent as morphine, called epibatidine, that has unfortunately demonstrated unacceptable gastrointestinal side effects in humans.[20] Secretions from dendrobatids are also showing promise as muscle relaxants, heart stimulants and appetite suppressants.[21] The most poisonous of these frogs, the Golden Poison Frog (Phyllobates terribilis), has enough toxin on average to kill ten to twenty men or about ten thousand mice.[22] Most other dendrobatids, while colorful and toxic enough to discourage predation, pose far less risk to humans or other large animals.

en.wikipedia.org...

Photograph by Paul Zahl


Dyeing Poison Dart Frog
Photograph by George Grall
Poison dart frogs, members of the Dendrobatidae family, wear some of the most brilliant and beautiful colors on Earth. Depending on individual habitats, which extend from the tropical forests of Costa Rica to Brazil, their coloring can be yellow, gold, copper, red, green, blue, or black. Their elaborate designs and hues are deliberately ostentatious to ward off potential predators, a tactic called aposematic coloration.







Blue Poison Dart Frog
Photograph by George Grall

Poison dart frogs, like this sapphire-blue species, are highly toxic. Their brilliant colors broadcast a warning to potential predators: Keep away.




Strawberry Poison Dart Frog
Photograph by George Grall

Strawberry poison dart frogs are less venomous to humans than other poison dart frogs, but their toxins will cause swelling and a burning sensation.




Indiscriminate eaters, Amazon horned frogs can grow to about the size of a small plate.
Photograph by George Grall
Amazon Horned Frog Range
Fast Facts
Some Amazon villagers wear high leather boots called botas escuerzas to repel attacks by the highly territorial Amazon horned frog.
Size relative to a tea cup:
The first thing that stands out about the Amazon horned frog is its size. These rotund amphibians can grow to 8 inches (20 centimeters) in length and would cover a good-size tea saucer. They are found in freshwater marshes and pools throughout the Amazon Basin, from Colombia to Brazil.




Ornate horned toad. Image copyright American Museum of Natural History.

This frog is nicknamed the Pac-Man frog because of its enormous mouth and insatiable appetite. They are a sit-and-wait ambush predator and hide well-disguised on the ground or in leaf litter. Ornate horned frogs can swallow birds, insects, mice, or even other frogs whole. This species can be found in Uruguay, Argentina, and Brazil.



Dyeing Poison Dart Frog
Photograph by George Grall
Poison dart frogs, members of the Dendrobatidae family, wear some of the most brilliant and beautiful colors on Earth. Depending on individual habitats, which extend from the tropical forests of Costa Rica to Brazil, their coloring can be yellow, gold, copper, red, green, blue, or black. Their elaborate designs and hues are deliberately ostentatious to ward off potential predators, a tactic called aposematic coloration.





















www.stumbleupon.com...


Changes of aquatic habitats caused by chemicals are taking a toll, and unfortunately frogs seem to be bearing the brunt of the problem. In my own experiences, I have seen seeing several frogs and toads out in the woods with limb deformities. Studies and scientists are beginning to understand why frogs are dying out world wide. The main theory is that parasites are causing the problems and in particular a parasite known as the trematode. It is believed that the use of herbicides to kill weeds is also eliminating aquatic plants. Plant-derived oxygen is reduced, and herbicides also may have direct toxic effects on tadpoles and other animals, in one study, herbicide impacts on aquatic plants were associated with an increased frequency of severe trematode infection in the kidneys of tadpoles. Stormwater runoff from rain falling on asphalt and washing into the water system is a severe nationwide problem. The carcinogens from gasoline are some of the most dangerous cancer causing pollutants known to man. Surely these toxic chemicals are impacting the frog as well.

Frogs are very important to the ecosystems in which they live. They control bugs and help keep the ecosystem in balance.

Frogs are a very diverse type of animal. They are mostly found in wet areas but they are also found in deserts and on 15,000 high mountains. Learning about frogs can be really fun when you discover just how amazing these creatures are. It's a sad day every time one of these frog species disappears from the earth forever. Frogs have been around for 190 million years and are an ancient life form. Help protect frogs by becoming involved with water quality issues in your town and area, and by learning about frogs so you can share their magic and importance. If we begin to care about one animal and try and protect them perhaps we can begin to care about the water too and protect it as well. Protecting frogs protects the water.

www.deepcreektimes.com...

Hope you enjoyed the pics, thumbs up again mother nature! It is important to stop and take notice at times, of the beauty in our world along side all the tragedy. Let's just hope these critters thrive and continue to serve their purpose in the complex web of life.

Peace,
spec




posted on Jan, 26 2011 @ 04:55 PM
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So beautiful and so deadly these tiny little critters. I tell you what underestimate them and they will knock you on your butt. Just like anything in mother nature if you think about it. Thanks, I got family members that really are in love with these creatures I am going to share this thread with them.



posted on Jan, 26 2011 @ 04:58 PM
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they are some of the nicest looking cratures i have ever seen and i own tropical fish. thanks for the warning though, i will make sure not to try and eat any if i see them now.
s&f



posted on Jan, 26 2011 @ 05:01 PM
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I love those pics, reminded me of a Nor Cal fun fact..
Toad Tunnel



posted on Jan, 26 2011 @ 05:03 PM
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Very nice


The colors and variety of patterns are absolutely amazing.



posted on Jan, 26 2011 @ 05:11 PM
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Gorgeous!!! (and I never thought I'd say that about a frog!)

Amazing animals, I once had two treefrogs and one swallowed a peice of vivarium bark about 1inch across. It passed through his system and tore through his back. Took him to the vets who didnt have a clue so I pulled it out myself at home with a pair of tweezers and some iodine. Within a week it had healed up completley. How many other animals could do that?



posted on Jan, 26 2011 @ 05:12 PM
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S&F from me. They are such beautiful and amazing creatures and thank you for sharing those pictures. Frogs are also wonderful indicators of the health of an ecosystem, since apparently they are so fragile like the ecosystems themselves. Only birds catch my attention more than frogs.
edit on 26-1-2011 by tsawyer2 because: typo



posted on Jan, 26 2011 @ 05:14 PM
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reply to post by Golithion
 

Hey Golithion, I hear ya, it could be disastrous picking up one of these fellas for a closer observation. I think I'll just use a camera to preserve the experience.
Thanks for the reply,
spec

reply to post by lewman
 

Yea eatin' might not be such a good idea, except of course for the American bullfrog. You might actually satisfy your hunger with one of them, whereas these tiny critters are just for observing.
Thanks for chiming in,
spec


reply to post by exdog5
 

Thanks for that link, that is awesome!!! it probably wouldn't hurt to start putting more of those up and about.

Thanks for commenting,
spec

reply to post by daryllyn
 

Hey there daryllyn, glad ya dig em'! Thanks for the reply!
spec



posted on Jan, 26 2011 @ 05:18 PM
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reply to post by Britgirl
 

Hello Britgirl! So you might actually not mind kissing one of these heh?

Treebark?! Yikes! Thanks for the comment...

spec

reply to post by tsawyer2
 

Thanks for the comment tsawyer2, and speaking of birds:Awesome Birds
Additionally my profile has a few threads on birds, butterflies, flowers and other exotic nature organisms:My Profile
in the column on the left.

Peace,
spec
edit on 26-1-2011 by speculativeoptimist because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 26 2011 @ 07:43 PM
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A few more little gems, there is just no shortage of color and patterns.






Peace,
spec



posted on Jan, 26 2011 @ 07:47 PM
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reply to post by speculativeoptimist
 


About time we frogs got our proper due around here!


Heh - seriously though, great pics. Truly one of natures wonders and I'm not just saying that because I'm small and green.




posted on Jan, 26 2011 @ 08:01 PM
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reply to post by speculativeoptimist
 


This is one of the best posts I've seen in some time. When I see these pictures I have a hard time believing they are real - they look plastic. The fact that they are living breathing animals is amazing to say the least. Thanks for posting this.

One thing I've read (somebody more knowledgeable please chime in if I'm wrong) is that they derive their poisons from what they eat. If you fed them a different diet (and that didn't kill them) they would be able to be handled- I'm not willing to be the first try that out.



posted on Jan, 26 2011 @ 08:52 PM
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reply to post by Frogs
 

Hey Frogs, glad to share an appreciation with a distinguished member of the Anura(ian) clan.
Another fascinating attribute is their calls:



Thanks for commenting,
spec



posted on Jan, 26 2011 @ 09:01 PM
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reply to post by jawsismyfish
 



One thing I've read (somebody more knowledgeable please chime in if I'm wrong) is that they derive their poisons from what they eat. If you fed them a different diet (and that didn't kill them) they would be able to be handled- I'm not willing to be the first try that out.

It appears you are correct jaws, just don't let any ants or mites in the aquarium!


The most toxic of poison-dart frog species is Phyllobates terribilis. It is argued that dart frogs do not synthesize their poisons, but sequester the chemicals from arthropod prey items, such as ants, centipedes and mites. This is known as the dietary hypothesis.[17] Because of this, captive-bred animals do not contain significant levels of toxins. Despite the toxins used by some poison dart frogs, there are some predators that have developed the ability to withstand them, including the Amazon ground snake (Liophis epinephelus).[18]

en.wikipedia.org...

They are quite the spectacle, and admirable in their defense abilities. I thought it was interesting that the blue dart frogs were recognized in the animal kingdom as dangerous. I always thought red and/or yellow signified danger to predators. Perhaps this is only in these areas with the indigenous species.

Thanks for the reply,
spec



posted on Jan, 26 2011 @ 09:18 PM
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Does anyone know, I was wondering are the tadpoles just as pretty or do they change as they mature?



posted on Jan, 26 2011 @ 10:04 PM
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reply to post by Whateva69
 



was wondering are the tadpoles just as pretty or do they change as they mature?

Not sure Whateva69, that would be some cool colored tadpoles though.
I am guessing, from the species I am familiar with, that the tadpoles are more dark and uniform colored, and it is later in the development that the other features emerge.

spec



posted on Jan, 26 2011 @ 10:10 PM
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To answer the question of the tadpoles here you go: travel.mongabay.com...

And for anybody who want one as a pet it can not permeate your skin, but if you got a cut bad news, and apparently it comes from an ant they eat in the wild. allaboutfrogs.org...
jrscience.wcp.muohio.edu...



posted on Jan, 26 2011 @ 10:18 PM
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Oh I was just curious. when we were living Darwin NT we had thousands of green tree frogs in the kids wading pool.
We fed them lettuce and every now and then we would throw in a few pieces of dry dog food, it didn’t take them long to turn green.
As they started to get their legs, I threw in some plastic Tupperware lids so they had somewhere to rest and hop on. It was a cool experience for all of us.

Not that id like a swimming pool full of pretty poisonous dart frogs



posted on Jan, 26 2011 @ 10:42 PM
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Frogs (or "Chan Chu" in Chinese) are supposed to represent prosperity, good luck and good fortune. As long as the frog and amphibians alike live to grace the earth plane with their beauty; so shall the cash/money/coins that follows. I prefer the big guys: bull frogs. The smaller ones look like flowers that are ready to hop away!



posted on Jan, 26 2011 @ 10:44 PM
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Oh...my...God! They are just gorgeous!!!!!!! I just love frogs, and these little guys are just amazing! Thank you soooo much for sharing these with us!



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