Bachmann: Founding fathers ‘worked tirelessly’ to end slavery

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posted on Jan, 31 2011 @ 06:24 PM
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reply to post by kinda kurious
 


Well, knowing she was not talking about the Chicago Bears, since they got CRUSHED by the Packers!


But 4 Beers sounds good to me!

Let me help you there KK



Forbears definition

: ancestor, forefather; also : precursor —usually used in plural

Would not want to actually use the TRUTH now would we?

By the way Mods, isn't this considered a HOAX when someone proves it to be a HOAX?

edit on 31-1-2011 by saltheart foamfollower because: (no reason given)




posted on Jan, 31 2011 @ 07:50 PM
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"But we also know that the very founders that wrote those documents worked tirelessly until slavery was no more in the United States."


The word "founders" is found in her speech, and of them she said they "worked tirelessly until slavery was no more in the United States."


Were not our Founding Fathers all dead by the time "slavery was no more in the United States"?



posted on Jan, 31 2011 @ 07:58 PM
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reply to post by saltheart foamfollower
 


I'm not sure what you are blathering about, the quote from OP:



"But we also know that the very founders that wrote those documents worked tirelessly until slavery was no more in the United States," Bachmann added, claiming "men like John Quincy Adams... would not rest until slavery was extinguished in the country."


The founders that wrote those documents seems to imply the authors of the constitution, no?

You can watch it here:



Might want to check your camo tee shirt. Sometimes if you wear them backwards, the label can restrict blood flow to the brain via carotid arteries. Hallucinations are common.
edit on 31-1-2011 by kinda kurious because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 31 2011 @ 08:31 PM
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reply to post by kinda kurious
 


From here- bigjournalism.com...



Pennsylvania and Massachusetts abolished slavery in 1780; Connecticut and Rhode Island did so in 1784; New Hampshire in 1792; Vermont in 1793; New York in 1799; and New Jersey in 1804. Furthermore, the reason that the states of Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, and Iowa all prohibited slavery was a federal act authored by Rufus King (signer of the Constitution) and signed into law by President George Washington which prohibited slavery in those territories.



Still trying to find a transcript

But here is some more information-


“I can only say that there is not a man living who wishes more sincerely than I do to see a plan adopted for the abolition of it [slavery].”
—George Washington

“[M]y opinion against it [slavery] has always been known… [N]ever in my life did I own a slave.”
—John Adams, Signer of the Declaration of Independence and U.S. President. The Works of John Adams, Second President of the United States (Boston: Little, Brown, and Company, 1854), vol IX pp. 92-93. In a letter to George Churchman and Jacob Lindley on January 24, 1801.

“[W]hy keep alive the question of slavery? It is admitted by all to be a great evil.”
—Charles Carroll, Signer of the Declaration of Independence. Kate Mason Rowland, Life and Correspondence of Charles Carroll of Carrollton (New York and London: G.P. Putnam’s Sons, 1898), Vol. II, pg. 231.

“As Congress is now to legislate for our extensive territory lately acquired, I pray to Heaven that they …[c]urse not the inhabitants of those regions, and of the United States in general, with a permission to introduce bondage [slavery].”
—John Dickinson, Signer of the Constitution and Governor of Pennsylvania. Charles J. Stille, The Life and Times of John Dickinson (Philadelphia: J.B. Lippincott Company, 1898) p. 324.

“That men should pray and fight for their own freedom and yet keep others in slavery is certainly acting a very inconsistent as well as unjust and perhaps impious part.”
—John Jay, President of Continental Congress, Chief-Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, and Governor of New York. Correspondence and Public Papers of John Jay, Henry P. Johnston, editor (New York and London: G.P. Putnam’s Sons, 1891), Vol. III, pp. 168-169. In a letter to Dr. Richard Price on Sep. 27, 1785.

“Christianity, by introducing into Europe the truest principles of humanity, universal benevolence, and brotherly love, had happily abolished civil slavery. Let us who profess the same religion practice its precepts… by agreeing to this duty.”
—Richard Henry Lee, President of Continental Congress and Signer of the Declaration of Independence. Memoir of the Life of Richard Henry Lee and His Correspondence With the Most Distinguised Men in America and Europe (Philadelphia: H.C. Carey and I. Lea, 1825), Vol. I, pp. 17-19. The first speech of Richard Henry Lee in the House of Burgesses.

“[I]t ought to be considered that national crimes can only be and frequently are punished in this world by national punishments; and that the continuance of the slave trade, and thus giving it a national sanction and encouragement, ought to be considered as justly exposing us to the displeasure and vengeance of Him who is equally Lord of all and who views with equal eye the poor African slave and his American master.”
—Luther Martin, Constitutional Convention Delegate. James Madison, The Records of the Federal Convention, Max Farrand, editor (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1911), Vol. III, pg. 211.

“Domestic slavery is repugnant to the principles of Christianity… It is rebellion against the authority of a common Father. It is a practical denial of the extent and efficacy of the death of a common Savior. It is an usurpation of the prerogative of the great Sovereign of the universe who has solemnly claimed an exclusive property in the souls of men.”
—Benjamin Rush, Signer of the Declaration of Independence. Minutes of the Proceedings of a Convention of Delegates From the Abolition Societies Established in Different Parts of the United States, Assembled at Philadelphia, on the First Day of January, One Thousand Seven Hundred and Ninety-Four… (Philadelphia: Zachariah Poulson, 1794), p. 24. “To the Citizens of the United States.”

“Slavery, or an absolute and unlimited power in the master over life and fortune of the slave, is unauthorized by the common law… The reasons which we sometimes see assigned for the origin and the continuance of slavery appear, when examined to the bottom, to be built upon a false foundation. In the enjoyment of their persons and of their property, the common law protects all.”
—James Wilson, Signer of the Constitution and U.S. Supreme Court Justice. James Wilson, The Works of James Wilson, Robert Green McCloskey, editor (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1967), Vol. II, pg. 605.

“It is certainly unlawful to make inroads upon others… and take away their liberty by no better right than superior force.”
—John Witherspoon, Signer of the Declaration of Independence. The Works of John Witherspoon (Edinburgh: J. Ogle, 1815), p. 81, “Lectures on Moral Philosophy.”



But hey, who is actually ATTEMPTING to rewrite history?



edit on 31-1-2011 by saltheart foamfollower because: quotes



posted on Jan, 31 2011 @ 08:35 PM
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reply to post by whaaa
 


I think you'll find us Brits led the way and abolished slavery long before the US of A


Hilarious gaffe on her part though.



posted on Jan, 31 2011 @ 08:36 PM
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Still cannot find an entire transcript, but here is a partial-www.mediaite.com...


“Bachmann (R-MN) also noted how slavery was a ’scourge’ on American history, but added that ‘we also know that the very founders that wrote those documents worked tirelessly until slavery was no more in the United States.’

‘And,’ she continued, ‘I think it is high time that we recognize the contribution of our forbearers who worked tirelessly — men like John Quincy Adams, who would not rest until slavery was extinguished in the country.’

It’s true — Adams became a vocal opponent of slavery, especially during his time in the House of Representatives. But Adams was not one of the founders, nor did he live to see the Emancipation Proclamation signed in 1863 (he died in 1848).”


But HEY, let us take only ONE sentence out and dismiss the context right?






posted on Jan, 31 2011 @ 08:38 PM
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reply to post by duality90
 


A gaffe huh?

Hmmm, there were states in the US that slavery was abolished IMMEDIATELY, but you Brits were the first right?

Revisionist history is sooo funny.



posted on Jan, 31 2011 @ 08:59 PM
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Waiting for REBUTTAL!

Hello, hello, bueller, BUELLER, BUELLER!



posted on Jan, 31 2011 @ 09:02 PM
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reply to post by saltheart foamfollower
 


Seriously dude, I've never seen you so unwilling to accept the proof before your eyes. Please review the clip in my last post @ 2:15 it verifies her exact words about the authors of the Constitution. Heck she even makes a little hand scribbling gesture for the thinking impaired.

And regarding this:


“I can only say that there is not a man living who wishes more sincerely than I do to see a plan adopted for the abolition of it [slavery].”
—George Washington



To which I once again reply, actions speak louder than words. Or more succinctly "Practice what you preach."


1752
After the death of his half-brother, George Washington purchased his sister-in-laws share in the Mount Vernon estate including 18 slaves. The ledgers and account books which he kept show that he bought slaves whenever possible to replenish the original 18. In the account books of Washington, the entries show that in 1754 he bought two make and a female; in 1756, two males, two females and a child, etc. In 1759, the year in which he was married, his wife Martha, brought him thirty –nine "dower-Negroes." He kept separate records of these Negroes all his life and mentions them as a separate unit in his will.


By the time of Washington's death, (in 1799) more than 300 (314 given by Mt. Vernon) slaves resided at Mount Vernon. Besides the field hands, there were blacksmiths, carpenters, shoemakers, brickmakers, and spinners.Though in death Washington willed that his slaves would be freed upon the death of Martha. The will provided that a special fund, be set up for the support of the aged and infirm. No evidence was found that the executors set up a trust fund as specified in the will.


www.innercity.org...

Kindly read the entire thread so we don't have to back track.
Thanks
edit on 31-1-2011 by kinda kurious because: (no reason given)
edit on 31-1-2011 by kinda kurious because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 31 2011 @ 09:06 PM
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reply to post by kinda kurious
 


Has anyone posted a transcript? I would HATE to have to transcribe the video myself, you know, using the ACTUAL context of the sentence does help.

So, states that abolished slavery at THE BEGINNING of the country is not attempting to abolish slavery.

Thanks for the class in revisionist history.

Tell me, how many states had slavery when the Union was created? Hmmmm?

Did ALL 13 have slavery? Well?

Bueller, Bueller, Bueller!



posted on Jan, 31 2011 @ 09:08 PM
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Originally posted by saltheart foamfollower
Waiting for REBUTTAL!


...the 4beers thang was kinda funny - but - idolizing genocidal maniacs isnt...



posted on Jan, 31 2011 @ 09:11 PM
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Game, Set, MATCH!



Well, since I PROVED that their were Founders and Forebears that worked tirelessly to abolish slavery, time to put this thread where it belongs-

Hoax bin!



Or is someone going to still argue that there were not states that where slavery was abolished.

Things that make you go-

Hmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm!




posted on Jan, 31 2011 @ 09:14 PM
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reply to post by saltheart foamfollower
 


Just go back to page one and read the entire thread. This was all covered.

It is YOU attempting to rewrite history by IGNORING the indelible stain upon American history that was slavery.

There seems to be some new TPM agenda to scrub the past of unspeakable acts.



posted on Jan, 31 2011 @ 09:17 PM
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reply to post by Wyn Hawks
 


What?!

Nevermind, I am not going to go down the path of Native American argument. This thread has nothing to do with that.

Also, where has anyone idolized anyone. I idolize the Constitution and the absolute beauty it contained within it. Yes it had flaws like the 3/5ths component, but it had ways to remedy those problems.

Enough of the sidetrack of the thread though.



posted on Jan, 31 2011 @ 09:19 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Jan, 31 2011 @ 09:21 PM
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reply to post by kinda kurious
 




You are soooo funny, it is you and others that are attempting to rewrite history, not I or Bachmann.

I will say again, I PROVED the FACT that there were Founders and Forbears that worked tirelessly to abolish slavery, therefore the tenet of the thread is a HOAX.

You attempting to subvert the debate by putting words in my mouth or other's mouths is fallacious.

Admit defeat. Attempting to move the goal post only makes you look weaker than your fallacious argument.

Tah tah.



posted on Jan, 31 2011 @ 09:26 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Jan, 31 2011 @ 09:33 PM
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reply to post by saltheart foamfollower
 


IN A NUT SHELL:


Slavery was an institution in the United States for generations after its founding in 1776, largely due to a compromise between the founders that established African-Americans as three-fifths of a person. Several of the founding fathers themselves held slaves.

One of the framers, Thomas Jefferson, famously fathered children with Sally Hemmings, one of his slaves.

Slavery was not fully abolished until 1865, when the United States ratified the Thirteenth Amendment to the Constitution that expressly forbade it.


SOURCE


edit on 31-1-2011 by kinda kurious because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 31 2011 @ 09:35 PM
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reply to post by duality90
 


Oh by the way, since the US abolished slavery in many of the States in the very beginning, I think you are incorrect on your timeline.

I know, Wiki-en.wikipedia.org...


The Slavery Abolition Act 1833 (citation 3 & 4 Will. IV c. 73) was an 1833 Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom abolishing slavery throughout most of the British Empire (with the notable exceptions "of the Territories in the Possession of the East India Company," the "Island of Ceylon," and "the Island of Saint Helena").[1] The Act was repealed in 1998 as part of a wider rationalisation of English statute law, but later anti-slavery legislation remains in force.



posted on Jan, 31 2011 @ 09:58 PM
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reply to post by saltheart foamfollower
 


Well I really wanna know why you are playing D for a neocon???

Are you gonna call her a liberal in ten years after she destroys some function in society and need a place to point the finger? The buck stops there.

Naw, but really, this lady is all about getting into peoples business, is this how the fabled "real conservative" myth will be propagated until the end of time

"Just wait til we get this socialist out!" (so we can do nothing to match are rhetoric like we always do)





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