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The USPTO is a lawyer scam

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posted on Jan, 25 2011 @ 11:47 PM
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I'm pretty convinced that the USPTO is a lawyer scam and that America should open source the patent office, end all the copyright laws, and let chaos ensue...would everybody come out ahead if there were no copyright laws?

Think about it, you could manufacture whatever you wish and nobody could stop you from doing so. You could download whatever you want and nobody could do anything about it.

Okay, so maybe the corporate giants would suffer and go bankrupt from all the stealing that would occur, but so what!? 99.9999% of people don't care as long as they get tons of free stuff




posted on Jan, 26 2011 @ 12:11 AM
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I agree 100%.

You cannot own an idea.

The proof is that the only remedy is to send cops and lawyers after people who "break the rules".

Therefore the natural state of nature is freedom. And governments are only designed to clamp down on that freedom.

Down with the USPTO.



posted on Jan, 26 2011 @ 12:12 AM
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Originally posted by quantum_flux

Okay, so maybe the corporate giants would suffer and go bankrupt from all the stealing that would occur, but so what!? 99.9999% of people don't care as long as they get tons of free stuff


Good.

They are the bane of existence anyway.

Let em rot.

We won't get free stuff. We can just freely exchange ideas and information.

edit on 26-1-2011 by muzzleflash because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 26 2011 @ 12:51 AM
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What's the USPTO? Seems like abbreviations are the only scam here.

MOTF!



posted on Jan, 26 2011 @ 03:10 AM
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The streets of Hong Kong are a perfect example of how Futile and Absurd copyright and patent laws are. They are the masters of cheap knock offs, it even has a brand name on it! But it's just a copy.

Oakley sunglasses and Rolex watches are a really common example. A Rolex for 15$?? Yay, I'll take 5 sir.

And look at the internet. It's another example of how absurd these laws truly are in reality. You can basically download any movie, music, game, or software program for free. There are cracks and hacks for everything. Key code generators etc.

They are just trying to hold us back. They are trying to keep us poor, essentially.

By eliminating these laws, the standard of living for everyone will skyrocket to unimaginable heights.

However, Corporations will have to change their policies and adapt to a free market in that scenario. Right now they have the market cornered and are using despotic tactics to artificially keep their positions of power and wealth.

Forward thinking corporations can not only survive in this scenario, but would thrive as champions of a free market by promoting the free flow of ideas and technology.

In fact, I would propose that in a free market system, we would see far less corruption and corporations would compliment society and uplift our human spirit. They would no longer drain us of our blood,sweat, and tears.



posted on Jan, 26 2011 @ 03:12 AM
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Originally posted by MessOnTheFED!
What's the USPTO? Seems like abbreviations are the only scam here.

MOTF!


Seriously? Google is your friend!
USPTO

United States Patent and Trademark Office.

Now you know.



posted on Jan, 26 2011 @ 07:53 AM
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reply to post by muzzleflash
 


Im fully aware of the functionality of google. It was my understanding that abreviations are kind of a no-no around here. My bad.

MOTF!



posted on Jan, 26 2011 @ 08:59 AM
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I agree there are big problems here. Walt Disney has done a huge disservice to the copyright industry by continuing to lobby the limit that copyright expires and the works enter the public domain. It is about 75 years after the creators death, the trademark on Micky Mouse has been the driving factor. The drug industry is more reasonable with about a 5-7 year exclusive licence to help get back some of the development costs before the drug enters the public domain. I can see some arguments for allowing the creator to have an exclusive license for a little while to help get their foot in the market from creating it and get back some development costs, but some of these extended time limits are ridiculous and agree that they should be removed. The way the system is now is just stifling development and cultural expression, promoting petty and outrageous legal cases and allows those with no creative input to gravy train off the system.



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