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Cell for spying on the U.S for China

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posted on Jan, 25 2011 @ 05:09 AM
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Cell for spying on the U.S for China


translate. google.nl


A U.S. court has sentenced an engineer to 32 years in prison for selling military secrets to China.

The 66-year-old man worked in the U.S. participated in the design of the B-2 stealth bomber. Between 2003 and 2005 he travelled regularly to China. There he sold his knowledge for $ 110,000. With that money he wanted to pay his holiday/home in Hawaii mortgage repayments.


(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Jan, 25 2011 @ 05:09 AM
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According to the man the information he sold was not secret. The court finds that his duty of loyalty to the U.S. was violated. The man goes on appeal.

Sentenced an engineer to 32 years in prison?


1 Was he an contractor for the US army?

2 Since when do you have to be loyal to an country?

3 Did he sign a contract witch prevents him from selling his knowledge for money?

4 32years, he must be a very dangerous person. In the Netherlands 32years is like 7times the time you get for murder.
Where is the justice in this sentence?

5 We could sue the US for not being loyal to its own people(to start with)(wikileaks) Should we?




translate. google.nl
(visit the link for the full news article)
edit on 25-1-2011 by TribeOfManyColours because: (no reason given)

edit on 25-1-2011 by TribeOfManyColours because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 25 2011 @ 05:24 AM
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theres a flaw with your links. nothing there.



posted on Jan, 25 2011 @ 05:42 AM
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posted on Jan, 25 2011 @ 05:49 AM
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reply to post by TribeOfManyColours
 


$110,000?

Blimey, he was cheap wasn't he!

I bet the Chinese were rubbing their hands together when that berk came along! $110,000 for design specs of a B2?

32 years is not individual justice, it's a warning to others who may be thinking of following suit.

Frankly, stealing and selling technology is a crime. It's at least industrial espionage. He deserves going down for selling it so cheaply, if nothing else!



posted on Jan, 25 2011 @ 06:01 AM
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reply to post by spikey
 


I think now its just a question of how the case evolves.
The engineer self says that there are no secrets sold

Even that 32years is long. In the Netherlands your get average 5years for murder



posted on Jan, 25 2011 @ 06:21 AM
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Originally posted by TribeOfManyColours

According to the man the information he sold was not secret. The court finds that his duty of loyalty to the U.S. was violated. The man goes on appeal.

Sentenced an engineer to 32 years in prison?


1 Was he an contractor for the US army?

Wouldn't matter the least. Only difference is he'd get court martial rather then a public trial.


Originally posted by TribeOfManyColours
2 Since when do you have to be loyal to an country?

No one says you have to be 'loyal' but as you're living in this country you have to abide by the rules and regulations presented by the PEOPLE during the 300+ years of our existence.


Originally posted by TribeOfManyColours
3 Did he sign a contract witch prevents him from selling his knowledge for money?

He doesn't need to. in order to live in America, he has to abide by the laws set forth by congress. One of those laws has to deal with Espionage. The penalty for such violations could be the Death Penalty.


Originally posted by TribeOfManyColours
4 32years, he must be a very dangerous person. In the Netherlands 32years is like 7times the time you get for murder.
Where is the justice in this sentence?

Like I said, espionage is punishable by DEATH. 32 years, opposed to the siodine, is great.



Originally posted by TribeOfManyColours
5 We could sue the US for not being loyal to its own people(to start with)(wikileaks) Should we?

Go ahead, bring the issue to the supreme court. Lets see how far you get.



posted on Jan, 25 2011 @ 06:26 AM
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Originally posted by TribeOfManyColours
5 We could sue the US for not being loyal to its own people(to start with)(wikileaks) Should we?

Go ahead, bring the issue to the supreme court. Lets see how far you get.

Not far



posted on Jan, 25 2011 @ 07:40 AM
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DUMB!
they Let the Chinese people go in and take notes?
why not Give Jobs to Americans?

I think it was fauls info.
or are they that stupid?



posted on Jan, 25 2011 @ 08:30 AM
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Originally posted by TribeOfManyColours


Originally posted by TribeOfManyColours
5 We could sue the US for not being loyal to its own people(to start with)(wikileaks) Should we?

Go ahead, bring the issue to the supreme court. Lets see how far you get.


Not far

no it is best left with the United Nations....



posted on Jan, 25 2011 @ 08:56 AM
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I say hang him!!

second line........



posted on Jan, 25 2011 @ 09:42 AM
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He may not have sold anything that was secret, but someone else working on the B2 might have. The Chinese utilise an espionage strategy known as “mosaic” or alternatively “human wave” intelligence gathering. It involves having a huge number of low-placed agents working on a specific task, each collecting a relatively small amount of intelligence that is of negligible value by itself, but when pieced together produce a very clear picture indeed, hence “mosaic”.

The Chinese are thought to be increasing their intelligence gathering activities in the US. Before 2000, one instance of Chinese espionage was detected per year if you were lucky. From 2000-2006, 1 to 3 instances of espionage were detected per year. In 2007 five were detected. In 2008 and 2009 at least 7 were detected each year. In 2010 this number had risen to 12.

Although the vast majority of Chinese agents in the US are low-placed and poorly trained if at all (though this is mostly due to the “mosaic” strategy requiring very large numbers of agents and are therefore bound to make up the vast majority anyway), the high-placed and highly trained agents are extremely proficient in their operational security, and may never be detected at all. For example Larry Chin was in place and selling secrets for 30 years and was only uncovered by a defector. Analysts worry and suspect that the increasing level of Chinese espionage will utilise more of these high-placed agents.



posted on Jan, 25 2011 @ 09:46 AM
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And so China Strikes Again!!The sage continues.

Really interesting info you got here.Wonder how many other spies they have lurking around in the U.S.



posted on Jan, 28 2011 @ 01:08 PM
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reply to post by TribeOfManyColours
 


I believe you are referring to this individual.

en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Jan, 28 2011 @ 01:18 PM
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Originally posted by SlovenlyGhost
And so China Strikes Again!!The sage continues.

Really interesting info you got here.Wonder how many other spies they have lurking around in the U.S.

Money is the name of the game. Espionage is nothing new. Every country involved in the world wars were spying on each other. Istanbul Turkey was the spy hotspot in those days to exchange information. Nowadays with Globalization and Internet, the network is easy to setup for any country willing to spend money on cracking the scientists or individuals who have access to information. As long as the hunger and greed for Money is present, it would be difficult to control the infiltration of spies even despite compartmentalized efforts.



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