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Internet Will Soon Run Out of Addresses

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posted on Jan, 24 2011 @ 03:20 AM
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www.theprovince.com...
Source: Agence France-Presse
Date Published: January 21, 2011


SYDNEY (AFP) - The world will run out of Internet addresses "within weeks", according to one of the founding fathers of the web, a report said Friday.

"I thought it was an experiment and I thought that 4.3 billion would be enough to do an experiment," Cerf, who is Google's vice president and "Chief Internet Evangelist", was quoted as saying in an interview.

"Who the hell knew how much address space we needed?"
To resolve the crisis, an updated protocol for the Internet, IPv6, currently being planned by the industry, will create trillions of addresses.


Wow, the internet is expanding pretty quickly...who knows what the internet will turn into in the next decade or so!




posted on Jan, 24 2011 @ 03:24 AM
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Update on the Internet:
Publish date: January 14, 2011

World IPv6 Day Will Test a New Era for the Internet


www.sci-tech-today.com...


There's a new web coming, and the test run will be on June 8, 2011

A new era in the Internet will be tested on World IPv6 Day, when Facebook, Google, Yahoo and others will run a 24-hour, real-world test.

The heavy traffic on those sites should show any problems that need to be fixed before the switch from IPv4 to IPv6. World IPv6 Day will help keep the Internet from running out of web addresses under IPv4.

The current 32-bit IPv4 dates back to 1980 and a time when its 4.5 billion addresses seemed like a lot. IPv6 utilizes 128-bit addresses, and IPv6 proponents say the new technology could offer -- if needed -- a vast number of addresses that should keep humanity happy until the sun burns out.



edit on 24-1-2011 by Skywatcher2011 because: added note



posted on Jan, 24 2011 @ 03:39 AM
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So other than expanding IP addresses, will this change anything noticable to the people? Any thoughts on if this conversion will affect sites like Wikileaks



posted on Jan, 24 2011 @ 03:46 AM
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this sounds like a load of bs to me



posted on Jan, 24 2011 @ 04:05 AM
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IPv6 has been in effect for many years now.

Copied from Wikipedia:

Internet Protocol Version 6 (IPv6) is a version of the Internet Protocol that is designed to succeed Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4). IPv4 is the first publicly used Internet Protocol and has been in operation since 1981.
IPv6 is an Internet Layer protocol for packet-switched internetworking and provides end-to-end datagram transmission across multiple IP networks. As a datagram service it does not guarantee reliability, a function provided at the Transport Layer. The main driving force for the redesign of Internet Protocol was the foreseeable IPv4 address exhaustion. IPv6 was developed by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF), and is described in Internet standard document RFC 2460, published in December 1998.[1]
IPv6 uses a 128-bit address, whereas IPv4 uses only 32 bits. The new address space supports 2 (to the power of)128 (about 3.4×10(to the power of)38) addresses. This expansion provides considerable flexibility in allocating addresses and routing traffic. It also eliminates the primary need for network address translation (NAT), which gained widespread deployment as an effort to alleviate IPv4 address exhaustion.
IPv6 also implements many other new features. It simplifies aspects of address assignment (stateless address autoconfiguration) and network renumbering (prefix and router announcements) when changing Internet connectivity providers. The IPv6 subnet size has been standardized by fixing the size of the host identifier portion of an address to 64 bits to facilitate an automatic mechanism for forming the host identifier from link layer media addressing information (MAC address). Network security is also integrated into the design of the IPv6 architecture, and the IPv6 specification mandates support for IPsec as a fundamental interoperability requirement.
For deployment, IPv6 is largely incompatible with IPv4 at the packet level, and translation services have practical issues that make them controversial.[2] IPv6 and IPv4 are therefore treated as almost entirely separate networks with devices having two separate protocol stacks if access to both networks is needed, with tunneling of IPv6 on IPv4 and vice versa. In December 2008, despite marking its 10th anniversary as a Standards Track protocol, IPv6 was only in its infancy in terms of general worldwide deployment. A 2008 study[3] by Google Inc. indicated that penetration was still less than one percent of Internet-enabled hosts in any country. IPv6 has been implemented on all major operating systems in use in commercial, business, and home



posted on Jan, 24 2011 @ 04:12 AM
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Uhm, Havent I heard this months ago?

I see the published date yes, But I heard this on ATS long time ago.
And also there they said "within weeks"..



posted on Jan, 24 2011 @ 04:15 AM
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Originally posted by mileysubet
IPv6 has been in effect for many years now.


thats true, this "news" seems to me like few years old



posted on Jan, 24 2011 @ 04:16 AM
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Originally posted by ALLisMIND
So other than expanding IP addresses, will this change anything noticable to the people? Any thoughts on if this conversion will affect sites like Wikileaks


As the poster above said IPv6 has been coming on line for a few years now really, so most people won't notice I would of thought, maybe lots of new url extensions (like the one now are things like .com .co.uk .gov that sort of thing).

But anyone running newer operating systems and web browsers etc the you wont notice at all I would think... People running really old SW (say pre XP days) would need to find ways to implement IPv6.



posted on Jan, 24 2011 @ 04:19 AM
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Wow, the internet is expanding pretty quickly...who knows what the internet will turn into in the next decade or so!



Skynet!

2nd



posted on Jan, 24 2011 @ 04:53 AM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Jan, 24 2011 @ 06:12 AM
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reply to post by Skywatcher2011
 


Big Corporations will buy it all up. They have expiration date seekers data mining and purchasing the

addresses the moment they are available. Prep school boy games.

Eventually it is all going to be turned off. At least for a while. So don't worry about it too much.

Kinda like hitting the reset button on a pinball machine.

Catch you on the rebound,,,,,,,Wildmanimal



posted on Jan, 24 2011 @ 06:49 AM
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Uh, no. There is literally infinite amount of addresses. Qwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnm.,1234567890!@#$%&*()+-_/:;'?"=,www..com. Add it up.. Unlimited



posted on Jan, 24 2011 @ 07:26 AM
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reply to post by ypperst
 


Yes, there was a thread on this a couple of months ago. I too thought it was interesting. However since then I have also learned as others have posted, it's not a problem unless you have an older system. Nothing to be concerned about if your up to date with your system. This is my understanding as of now.



posted on Jan, 24 2011 @ 07:31 AM
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Originally posted by Myendica
Uh, no. There is literally infinite amount of addresses. Qwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnm.,1234567890!@#$%&*()+-_/:;'?"=,www..com. Add it up.. Unlimited


That's not the point, there are a finite amount of IP addresses!!! IPv4 can provide 4,294,967,296 (4.3 billion addresses)....... So with every single single thing having a static or a dynamic address then there really is only so many. - Cos remember it's not just computers, we have seen a massive amount of portable tech that connects to the net - each and every one needs to be assigned an IP.

IPv6 can give us 3.403×10^38 unique addresses, I'm gonna do this now!! that is 340,300,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 unique addresses
More than enough for the next few years. That is 34 undecillion.... Hmm all those zeros!



posted on Jan, 24 2011 @ 09:42 PM
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I guess technology news flies by quicker than some of us can keep up. Damn it. I'd almost close this thread now seeing as what I thought was new news, to now being obsolete news.

Btw, you are right with Skynet and corporations buying up the new urls.



posted on Jan, 26 2011 @ 01:11 PM
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It's 6 to 7 days until the ipv4 address runs out, it is a big deal.

United States Government Mandates Transition to IPv6



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