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National Identity Card w/Iris Scanned Image (But Only for Minors at this Time)

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posted on Jan, 24 2011 @ 05:44 AM
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reply to post by Laurauk
 


i doubt it would be reintroduced as an idea in the uk as it was blairs idea so cameron will stay well clear of it and i doubt ed milliband would want it (when all the lib dems vote labour in the next election) as it seems a bit right wing for ed's brand of socialism.

i would move out of the uk if they did though.




posted on Jan, 24 2011 @ 09:45 AM
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reply to post by Erongaricuaro
 


Each state has its own congress in Mexico. They have their own congress, supreme court and govenor/president just like in America. So, what I was referring to was politicians coming through to campaign. Even then some of the smaller villages are skipped entirely because they don't vote, or don't have any place to vote less than an hour away.

I should have been more clear.



posted on Jan, 24 2011 @ 11:16 AM
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Originally posted by MikeNice81
reply to post by Erongaricuaro
 


Each state has its own congress in Mexico. They have their own congress, supreme court and govenor/president just like in America. So, what I was referring to was politicians coming through to campaign. Even then some of the smaller villages are skipped entirely because they don't vote, or don't have any place to vote less than an hour away.

I should have been more clear.


Good point. I know a state diputado here along with a couple other non office-holders that have been candidates and they scour the ranchos trying to drum-up votes. They usually bring some goodies to pass around so the people like to see them on those occasions.

Mexico is still a place people can live and distance themselves from a lot of government interference, to a large extent. That is why I initially agreed that it would be doubtful they would have 100% compliance, with anything here. Which is fine, it is one of the reasons I like living here.

Mexico is a land of contradictions, it seems. The only consistency here is the lack of consistency. Still, they are very modern in ways and often use higher technologies than in the US in many places. The US would not have to complain about illegal aliens if they used some of the systems Mexico uses. And in large cities at major pedestrian crossings instead of the static Walk/Don't Walk symbols I see in the US cities they are animated here with the man-symbol casually walking at first, then as the seconds timer display counts down the symbol speeds up until he is seen running to cross before the light changes. Yet at the same street crossing, along with new cars passing by, a man with a pack burro loaded with garden top soil for sale may cross the same street.

I haven't cared to leave the country here in years now, and no plans to ever do so.



posted on Jan, 24 2011 @ 11:47 AM
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Maybe Mexico is the test country to work out all the flaws, see how it goes? Of course all other nations will follow suit. They have to have your information to make this happen. I personally have left a small trail for myself. started de-trailing myself a few years back. my husband is one of those sheeple people, he will take the target and i will sit back quietly watchign listening..



posted on Jan, 24 2011 @ 01:34 PM
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Mexico already has a form of national ID in place, though as has been pointed out it does not have total compliance with those who live in the outer reaches. In this case, though, it includes an image of the person's iris along with thumbprint, signature, photo, and such. This is the first country using this newer technology for improved personal identification.

QUESTIONS: Would this be more of an infringement against one's personal privacy than a thumbprint? Would such a more positive means of identification have negative implications - other than for a person who was attempting for any reason to mask their true ID? Would there be a plus-side to having improved identification techniques?

I tend to think people would be wary at first about having their iris photographed but don't feel it deprives a person of their privacy any more than using another type of identifier, though this may be a more positive means of ID than older systems. I can see less reluctance after people find the procedure itself is safe.

I am of the opinion this is only detrimental to someone who may be attempting to hide their true or actual ID and thwart the system - more difficult to falsify, though not foolproof.

I can see a number of advantages to using this along with less liklihood of mistaken ID.

For countries who have no national ID in place there would most certainly be grander implications by starting one than merely adding a new technology of ID into a system where personal ID already exists, for example when obtaining a driver's license.


edit on 24-1-2011 by Erongaricuaro because: (no reason given)



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