It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

National Identity Card w/Iris Scanned Image (But Only for Minors at this Time)

page: 1
4
<<   2 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jan, 23 2011 @ 10:32 PM
link   

National Identity Card w/Iris Scanned Image (But Only for Minors at this Time)


jurismex.wordpress.com

Mexico should initiate tomorrow the first stage of the process of collecting data for what will be the National Identity Card (Cédula de Identidad). The card will include signature, picture, fingerprints and—making noteworthy an otherwise gray news—iris images of its holder. Mexico will become the first country to use the eye’s image to identify their nationals, if all goes as planned.

(visit the link for the full news article)

nwodaily.com...

The interior minister, Francisco Blake Mora, presented the new Citizen Identity Card for those under 18yo. with it’s implementation beginning on January 24 in Tijuana, Baja California. The new Identity Card will start at an early stage in six states Baja California, Colima, Chiapas, Guanajuato, Jalisco and Nuevo Leon, adherence to the Constitution and the General Law.

“This Identity Card has security steps that are critical for our country, as provided by the Constitution and the Law,” he said.

www.mexico.vg...

edit on 24-1-2011 by Erongaricuaro because: to add source material

edit on 24-1-2011 by Erongaricuaro because: (no reason given)




posted on Jan, 23 2011 @ 10:32 PM
link   
For now this is only happening in Mexico and it is a big step in individual identification using a newer technology than anywhere else in the world at this time, so the question is when, not if, will the US and European nations begin using this means to identify its nationals?

I'm sure it's a good thing. Homeland Security must already have its eyes on you eyes. No worse than giving your thumbprint, right?

jurismex.wordpress.com
(visit the link for the full news article)


edit on 24-1-2011 by Erongaricuaro because: typo



posted on Jan, 23 2011 @ 10:47 PM
link   
reply to post by Erongaricuaro
 


Interesting that Mexico is implementing this.
We don't have a national id card here in the U S (yet) although
some legislators have been discussing it for years. The TSA
or Transportation Security Adminstration will however probably
be successful in implementing their "Known Traveler Number"
program long before we get a national id card.
edit on 23-1-2011 by manta78 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 23 2011 @ 10:49 PM
link   
reply to post by manta78
 


It's us using them as guinea pigs for this experiment.

S+F



posted on Jan, 23 2011 @ 10:50 PM
link   
how can mexico afford this with its huge national debt and war against drug cartels?

serioulsy?



posted on Jan, 23 2011 @ 10:57 PM
link   
I have one question to ask. How in the world are they going to get every dirt poor farmer in every village to do this?

I am being serious. I have family that live in Durango. There are "villages" there that only have two or three telephones for a couple hundred residents. Some of these places look like they could be the set for a remake of "The Good The Bad and The Ugly."

I think it is an overly ambitous plan. It might make some head way in the more urban areas. In the rural areas though it will fall flat. What a lot of Americans don't understand is that there are still places in Mexico where electricity is a luxury item. I actually spent some time on a ranch with no electriity and very crude plumbing. The water for bathing and flushing came from a cistern on the roof. All of the other water came from an old fashion well with a hand pump.

I just don't see every national getting this card.
edit on 23-1-2011 by MikeNice81 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 23 2011 @ 10:58 PM
link   
If the population resists the idea of a national ID card - it may be unconstitutional in some countries - is it possible voluntary compliance might yield an "express boarding" kind of effect, perhaps putting people with these cards, and who submit to an iris scan, to the front of the line in circumstances where ID needs to be verified?

Could a more effective method of ID, such as this, be mis-used by authorities?



posted on Jan, 23 2011 @ 11:02 PM
link   

Originally posted by MikeNice81
I have one question to ask. How in the world are they going to get every dirt poor farmer in every village to do this?

I just don't see every national getting this card.
edit on 23-1-2011 by MikeNice81 because: (no reason given)


Quite likely not. But for those who opt to use services and privileges offered by the government it may be required to be ID'd in order to be eligible. I could see it become a part of their voter ID card which already serves as a national ID.


edit on 23-1-2011 by Erongaricuaro because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 23 2011 @ 11:09 PM
link   

Originally posted by Erongaricuaro
If the population resists the idea of a national ID card - it may be unconstitutional in some countries - is it possible voluntary compliance might yield an "express boarding" kind of effect, perhaps putting people with these cards, and who submit to an iris scan, to the front of the line in circumstances where ID needs to be verified?

Could a more effective method of ID, such as this, be mis-used by authorities?


We do have a program like that now in the U S called "Clear" which uses biometric identification; from their website: "CLEAR's identification technology creates an impermeable link between a member and his or her biometrics. The gold chip on your CLEARcard enables fingerprinting and iris verification to confirm your identity."
Source: www.clearme.com...

It's not free however. Also from their website:

"Annual unlimited membership is $179. Add a household family member over 18 for $50. Corporate rates are available."

If you are a frequent air traveler I can see where it would come in handy avoiding long lines, etc.


edit on 23-1-2011 by manta78 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 23 2011 @ 11:14 PM
link   

Originally posted by okamitengu
how can mexico afford this with its huge national debt and war against drug cartels?

serioulsy?


I don't believe Mexico is quite the poor nation many think it is, after all, the world's richest man is Mexican. If you have not experienced Mexico in some time it may surprise you how technologically sophisticated they have become with administrative services and particularly immigrations.

You may have answered your own question, though. With the war on the drug cartels the Mexican government may be asking how can they afford not to use a more sophisticated means of identification. They already have the equivalent of a national card in place. This would just be an update.


edit on 24-1-2011 by Erongaricuaro because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 23 2011 @ 11:22 PM
link   
Ah yes, "doing it for the children," an age-old tearjerker frequently successful in parting rubes from their money or, in this case, their liberties.

And starting 'em off young has the extra benefit of softening up the rising generation for their further journey down the NWO rabbithole of survalience and control.



posted on Jan, 23 2011 @ 11:26 PM
link   
Is there an actual news source for this, or just a word press blog? I don't see any references to any sources about this at all.
I would take it with a grain of salt until further notice..



posted on Jan, 23 2011 @ 11:29 PM
link   
reply to post by Erongaricuaro
 


In a lot of these villages the only time they see government service is when the military come through chasing the Narcos. In the village where I spent a couple of weeks, in 2006, the only government service was two cops. The towns water system was installed by the government in the eighties and abandoned. The villagers have maintained it with their own engineering prowess (or lack there of) for twenty some years. The local doctor often serves three villages and works nearly for free. He isn't cheap by their standards, but it barely covers his expenses. He is in no way associated with the government.

The school is run by the villagers. The government built it in the seventies and abandoned it some years later. Most of the kids are taught by people that graduated the school before the government bailed out. They aren't college educated teachers. Many of the teachers have the equivalent of an eighth grade American education.

My point is that the government has completely abandoned many of these people and locations. They usually only see the government during elections. Many of them see no need for the government and have no use for it when it does show up. They wouldn't get one of these cards unless somebody set up a road block and forced them.




edit on 23-1-2011 by MikeNice81 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 23 2011 @ 11:31 PM
link   

Originally posted by bvproductions
Is there an actual news source for this, or just a word press blog? I don't see any references to any sources about this at all.
I would take it with a grain of salt until further notice..


Here's one source you got to love, nwodaily.com:


nwodaily.com...

which is also a blog, but they pulled the story from here: (which is an official Mexican government website)

www.mexico.vg...
edit on 23-1-2011 by manta78 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 23 2011 @ 11:31 PM
link   

Originally posted by silent thunder
Ah yes, "doing it for the children," an age-old tearjerker frequently successful in parting rubes from their money or, in this case, their liberties.

And starting 'em off young has the extra benefit of softening up the rising generation for their further journey down the NWO rabbithole of survalience and control.


It may be unconstitutional in the US to institute an national ID card - or not - but in a country that already has such a system in place, their national voter registration card, is a means of more positive identification a bad thing? Or will it just help to expedite ID verification?

I'm not sure I would want that intrusion, perhaps just so I could "disappear" or go off the grid. But for the purpose of exacting justice or verifying eligibility for services it could be an asset for a government.



posted on Jan, 23 2011 @ 11:41 PM
link   

Originally posted by MikeNice81
reply to post by Erongaricuaro
 



My point is that the government has completely abandoned many of these people and locations. They usually only see the government during elections. Many of them see no need for the government and have no use for it when it does show up. They wouldn't get one of these cards unless somebody set up a road block and forced them.




edit on 23-1-2011 by MikeNice81 because: (no reason given)



The government has been known to do just that but for other reasons, and they usually DO check ID at those. If the people you are concerned about DO see them at election time then they already have their ID Card. They will have that opportunity to have it updated.


edit on 23-1-2011 by Erongaricuaro because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 24 2011 @ 12:01 AM
link   

Originally posted by Smell The Roses
reply to post by manta78
 


It's us using them as guinea pigs for this experiment.

S+F


Not to mention it's probably cheaper to roll out in Mexico and is likely to meet a lot less resistance,especially from the parents who are scared out of there gourds by the CIA-funded drug cartels who are killing everything in sight.

Give it time,it'll spread...cancer always does....



posted on Jan, 24 2011 @ 12:14 AM
link   
Maybe there's some clause in NAFTA that will "require" the US and Canada to follow suit.
Gameplan:
Get it going in Mexico where the people could care less because they're more worried about trying to survive or being shot. Then roll it out up here with some lame excuse that blames past administrations and a complicated foreign trade agreement, so that the sheeple will grumble peacefully as they line up for the retinal scanner.



posted on Jan, 24 2011 @ 01:04 AM
link   
www.prisonplanet.com...

Get your ID so you can be force relocated into a comfy work camp.



posted on Jan, 24 2011 @ 01:22 AM
link   
I know for one the UK will not have it, it was scrapped by the current Government. Weither or not they itroduce it later on. Who knows. Going by the lies they have told already. I would not be surprised if they, do reintroduce it.




top topics



 
4
<<   2 >>

log in

join