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Police 'sensing crime before it happens'

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posted on Jan, 24 2011 @ 02:44 AM
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reply to post by Human_Alien
 


I thought the Xray vans were stopped as well.. I know back in the day police in the Northwest US were using the thermal imaging gear to look for "hotspots" in homes for marijuana cultivation. A case made it to the courts where it was thrown out. We have an expectation of privacy in our homes, and it was reinforced in the court case. Either get a warrant, or move on was the message from the ruling.

If this setup is being used on vehicles, it will most likely be chucked as well. We do have a certain amount of expectation of privacy within a vehicle. With Arizona Vs. Gant, it place a few more restrictions on LEO's and our ability to search vehicles.




posted on Jan, 24 2011 @ 02:59 AM
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reply to post by Xcathdra
 


Nope, you are right. It was that they predicted that it would happen on a certain block and it did happen within 3 minutes. By the time I got to the end of the article and finished the thread and replied, I had completely forgotten the line about the location being predicted.

That is a bit more impressive and I understand that they don't want to give out too much information about how it works in order to not tip off the criminals, but I would love to know what they used to figure it out down to a block. I stand by my contention that it it were just that a shooting would happen on the south side in the near future, that is just a general understood.

The south side needs all the help it can get. I won't venture too far into that area and never after dark anymore. It is like a war zone in some areas with the gangs and random other crime.

Take care,
Cindi
edit on 1/24/2011 by Glencairn because: Hopefully my life never depends on my ability to post without typos.



posted on Jan, 24 2011 @ 03:04 AM
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reply to post by Xcathdra
 


They can still look into electrical use spikes and such, you would have to be a moron though to be growing it in your own house!


I don't know if this falls under the police *sensing* the homocide, or really predicting it.. The two are a world of difference.

I mean would it still count if they got a call 30min before hand from a relative at x address saying their relative in x gang was somewhere at between location x and x location, and was upset about x happening. Then another call came in from x whoever saying they saw x gang by location x saying there going to kill x... Then the detectives come up with *there going to have a shooting between here and here*

That totally would make this seem not as *minority report*
edit on 24-1-2011 by hillynilly because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 24 2011 @ 03:21 AM
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reply to post by hillynilly
 


Offering a guess it looks like a combination of the crime stats cross referenced with received intelligence that comes in. Its possible its one of those this group of officers has puzzle piece A, and that group of officers has puzzle piece B, with the entire puzzle only being 2 pieces.

weirder things have happened.



posted on Jan, 24 2011 @ 01:24 PM
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Originally posted by Xcathdra
reply to post by hillynilly
 


Offering a guess it looks like a combination of the crime stats cross referenced with received intelligence that comes in. Its possible its one of those this group of officers has puzzle piece A, and that group of officers has puzzle piece B, with the entire puzzle only being 2 pieces.

weirder things have happened.


If it's crime that's being scripted... perhaps it just a matter of trying to figure out who the TARGET is.



posted on Jan, 24 2011 @ 01:34 PM
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This is anecdotal evidence - it means nothing, except it sounds "cool" and gets people reading.

Notice how the article doesn't tell you how many times it didn't predict crimes or how it falsely predicted crimes?

This article is designed to help politicians justify large law enforcement budgets and to give the false impression that they are actually getting something for the taxpayers dollars they've spent.

Public relations: mission accomplished.



posted on Jan, 24 2011 @ 03:03 PM
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Here ya go........................





posted on Jan, 24 2011 @ 05:23 PM
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Originally posted by DimensionalDetectiveChicago PD certainly ain't known as being the squeaky-cleanest bunch of folks,


Nor Los Angeles either. They have been corrupt since at least 1900. Probably longer.



posted on Jan, 24 2011 @ 05:27 PM
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reply to post by harrytuttle
 


agreed, if it were really physic it would've identified the owner of that unregistered gun



posted on Jan, 24 2011 @ 07:25 PM
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reply to post by searching4truth
 


Lol evidence gleaned from Psychics has as much chance as being admitted as evidence as the results of a lie detector test do.

In this case I think it boils down to good crime analysis, good intelligence, and people putting the info together to see a larger picture.

As others have pointed out all that occured was the prediction another murder would occur in an area, and it just so happens that 3 minutes later, it occured.

It reminds me of the saying that Politics is a dog eat dog world, where academics is the opposite.



posted on Feb, 19 2014 @ 02:12 PM
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reply to post by DimensionalDetective
 


I thought this was a good place to put an update on the story you originally posted. Chicago residents are now being visited for precrimes based on the technology you first posted! Minority Report much??

Chicago Residents Being Visited Based on Pre-Crime Surveillance List


Chicago's "Heat List" is an index of approximately 400 people who have been identified by a computer algorithm as being future threats to commit violent crime. Without having actually committed a crime, some of those on the list are beginning to get visits from Chicago police warning them that they are already being watched:
When the Chicago Police Department sent one of its commanders to Robert McDaniel’s home last summer, the 22-year-old high school dropout was surprised. Though he lived in a neighborhood well-known for bloodshed on its streets, he hadn’t committed a crime or interacted with a police officer recently. And he didn’t have a violent criminal record, nor any gun violations. In August, he incredulously told the Chicago Tribune, "I haven't done nothing that the next kid growing up hadn't done.” Yet, there stood the female police commander at his front door with a stern message: if you commit any crimes, there will be major consequences. We’re watching you.



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