Do you sin against God or man?

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posted on Jan, 22 2011 @ 11:54 AM
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Do you sin against God or man?

I saw this video and did not agree with it.

www.youtube.com...

If I sin, I think I sin against another human. Not against God. Against his law of course, or to be more specific, against the laws that men have attributed to God, but not against God.

This clip ignores the human victim altogether as if the victim has no right to feel offended and also have no responsibility to forgive the offender.

I find it rather droll that we are supposed to see God as the victim of all our sins.

If you were to visualize, for instance, God being the victim of all Gay sins, well you see what I mean.
Rather a startling picture right?

Sin also brings up the topic of forgiveness.

If you or I forgive a sin done against us, is there any reason for the sinner to kowtow to God for more forgiveness?

The sin, once forgiven by you or I is, well, forgiven. What exactly is God forgiving. The sin has been annulled by our forgiveness so God forgiving it is rather superfluous and in reality, if at the pearly gates, God were to seek to punish a forgiven sin then one could make a case that God is unjust.

Is God sticking his nose where it is not required in the case of saying we sin against him and in our seeking forgiveness for a forgiven sin?

Regards
DL




posted on Jan, 22 2011 @ 12:05 PM
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reply to post by Greatest I am
 


A sin is a sin. God is affected. The sinner is affected. The victim is affected. The people who the victim come in contact with are affected. And the people who come in contact with the people who come in contact with the victim are affected.

edit on 22-1-2011 by smithjustinb because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 22 2011 @ 12:06 PM
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reply to post by Greatest I am
 


Well, I sin against yo momma! So I guess I sin against (wo)Man. Besides, God, offended? Pffft! He's seen it all! lol (I'm just joking with the "yo momma".....sheesh!)



posted on Jan, 22 2011 @ 12:54 PM
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reply to post by ossminid
 


I think outside the box of religion. I have discovered that God is experiencing himself through us. What we see is what God sees, what we do is what god does. God is everything, and we are a part of that everything. Aaaaaannndd all is one.



posted on Jan, 22 2011 @ 01:50 PM
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Well in Jewish thought you sin against G-d. I guess you can disrespect your fellow man.



posted on Jan, 22 2011 @ 02:47 PM
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Originally posted by Sectumsempra
Well in Jewish thought you sin against G-d. I guess you can disrespect your fellow man.



Or goyim as the case may be. But then I guess that goes without saying, lol.



posted on Jan, 22 2011 @ 04:09 PM
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Cool. Never believed in sin anyway. The short answer to the OPs question is "no".
So if the victim of the (fictional) sin is (fictional) god then basically any discussion is hypothetical.

ganjoa



posted on Jan, 22 2011 @ 04:21 PM
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reply to post by Greatest I am
 


A sin is against God-realization, rather than God. A sin adds another covering or veil over the soul and further obscures the light of God.

The sin does not harm God, it only harms the sinner. If the sin was perpetuated against another, then naturally it also harms the other, but not in the same way.



If you or I forgive a sin done against us, is there any reason for the sinner to kowtow to God for more forgiveness?

The sin, once forgiven by you or I is, well, forgiven. What exactly is God forgiving. The sin has been annulled by our forgiveness so God forgiving it is rather superfluous and in reality, if at the pearly gates, God were to seek to punish a forgiven sin then one could make a case that God is unjust.



If we forgive the sin of another, we do not remove the obstructive layer over the soul that the sin has caused in the sinner. However, our forgiveness does release us from the need for retribution or justice for our own hurt. If we refuse to forgive, then our bond to the sinner through his sin against us would also form a barrier to our own God-realization.

All these barriers that the sins create between ourselves and God realization can only be removed by God. However, if we are attached to these sins, if we do not seek forgiveness for them, both from God and from our "victim", then it is we who wish to remain in the dark.



posted on Jan, 30 2011 @ 06:30 PM
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Originally posted by smithjustinb
reply to post by Greatest I am
 


A sin is a sin. God is affected. The sinner is affected. The victim is affected. The people who the victim come in contact with are affected. And the people who come in contact with the people who come in contact with the victim are affected.

edit on 22-1-2011 by smithjustinb because: (no reason given)


Hmm.
What effect does all those rapeings have on him?
A real man would not tolerate such.

Regards
DL



posted on Jan, 30 2011 @ 06:39 PM
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Originally posted by mysticnoon
reply to post by Greatest I am
 


A sin is against God-realization, rather than God. A sin adds another covering or veil over the soul and further obscures the light of God.

The sin does not harm God, it only harms the sinner. If the sin was perpetuated against another, then naturally it also harms the other, but not in the same way.



If you or I forgive a sin done against us, is there any reason for the sinner to kowtow to God for more forgiveness?

The sin, once forgiven by you or I is, well, forgiven. What exactly is God forgiving. The sin has been annulled by our forgiveness so God forgiving it is rather superfluous and in reality, if at the pearly gates, God were to seek to punish a forgiven sin then one could make a case that God is unjust.



If we forgive the sin of another, we do not remove the obstructive layer over the soul that the sin has caused in the sinner. However, our forgiveness does release us from the need for retribution or justice for our own hurt. If we refuse to forgive, then our bond to the sinner through his sin against us would also form a barrier to our own God-realization.

All these barriers that the sins create between ourselves and God realization can only be removed by God. However, if we are attached to these sins, if we do not seek forgiveness for them, both from God and from our "victim", then it is we who wish to remain in the dark.



Do you not feel strange going to seek forgiveness from one who used genocide against man?

It is like asking Hitler's forgiveness for killing a Jew.

Ridiculous.

Regards
DL





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