Tennis ball hits court but doesn

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posted on Jan, 21 2011 @ 04:16 PM
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reply to post by tonypazzohome
 




air absorbed the energy? it just went dead. i can see if the ball was dead, but this was a hard tennis court. there should have at least been a small bounce and roll.

Precisely. The ball literally STICKS to the ground. It doesn't even roll away. There's no way to explain that. My only theory is one already mentioned. Somehow air from the pocket created a suction on the ball. But that's...unlikely...




posted on Jan, 21 2011 @ 04:18 PM
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Inertial Dampening, anyone?

Many great advances are the result of accidental events or observations (penicillin comes to mind) ... Maybe someone can apply the principle of whatever caused the 'non-bounce' ... to ameliorate the problem of inertia (with the accompanying G Forces) in a fast moving system!


What?... Stranger things have happened



posted on Jan, 21 2011 @ 04:21 PM
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Wait...I've got a more reasonable explanation...the air pocket was caused by heat right? So thus it was probably sticky around that area? Do I need go on? However, she does seem to walk right over the area with no problem what so ever. Not even a sign of an air pocket.



posted on Jan, 21 2011 @ 04:24 PM
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I've seen this happen before. It is caused by air trapped under the surface of the court. Obviously, the participants of the tournament have seen this happen before as well, because they immediately went out and drilled holes in the court and the problem was solved.

Try bouncing a tennis ball off a pillow or a waterbed....same result as seen in the video. No conspiracy here. Nothing to hide. it happens sometimes with artificial surfaces.

edit on 21-1-2011 by Aggie Man because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 21 2011 @ 04:28 PM
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reply to post by Aggie Man
 




Try bouncing a tennis ball off a pillow or a waterbed

I just did, and it rolled at least a meter across my bed before stopping. The sudden stopping of the tennis ball was caused by something more than just some flimsy ground.

edit on 21-1-2011 by WhizPhiz because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 21 2011 @ 04:31 PM
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Originally posted by WhizPhiz
reply to post by Aggie Man
 




Try bouncing a tennis ball off a pillow or a waterbed

I just did, and it rolled at least a meter across my bed before stopping. The sudden stopping of the tennis ball was caused by something more than just some flimsy ground.

edit on 21-1-2011 by WhizPhiz because: (no reason given)


Let us make it a scientific experiment. Try it several times. Try putting different spins on the ball. 1 successful attempt doesn't make it a scientific certainty.

Let me know your results. I'll tell you what, I will go do it 100 times when I get home and I will post my results too.



Edit: try putting your pillow on the floor, so that you get the same downward thrust as shown in the video. Also try different intensities of the downward thrust (i.e., throw it as hard as you can, as soft as you can and variations between the two)
edit on 21-1-2011 by Aggie Man because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 21 2011 @ 04:34 PM
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Originally posted by Aggie Man
I've seen this happen before. It is caused by air trapped under the surface of the court. Obviously, the participants of the tournament have seen this happen before as well, because they immediately went out and drilled holes in the court and the problem was solved.

Try bouncing a tennis ball off a pillow or a waterbed....same result as seen in the video. No conspiracy here. Nothing to hide. it happens sometimes with artificial surfaces.

edit on 21-1-2011 by Aggie Man because: (no reason given)

That is a flat surface and she stepped in the area and the ball stuck and never rolled or moved.Maybe some sort of a way they have been ''FIX'' the out come of games?



posted on Jan, 21 2011 @ 04:40 PM
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Originally posted by Highergrounds
That is a flat surface and she stepped in the area and the ball stuck and never rolled or moved.Maybe some sort of a way they have been ''FIX'' the out come of games?


I'm not sure I get your point. She is not a 2-ounce tennis ball, so the physical reaction to her stepping on the court vs. the ball hitting the court is an apples to oranges comparison. Please clarify if I am misinterpreting your comment.
edit on 21-1-2011 by Aggie Man because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 21 2011 @ 04:59 PM
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reply to post by Aggie Man
 


I think the point is what happens when you step on a pillow or a waterbed?

A surface with enough tensile strength to support the woman's weight should offer enough resistance to cause the ball to bounce.
edit on 21-1-2011 by WTFover because: To avoid a one-liner



posted on Jan, 21 2011 @ 07:39 PM
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reply to post by Aggie Man
 


Time parameters: 7:21 to 7:29 pm Central time (moon location not taken into account).

Times throwing the tennis-ball in a similar downward fashion: 100
Times it deflected more than 12-inches: 52
Times it remained in position w/o reactionary movement (less than 12 inches): 48
Times it dropped and remained in place (no movement at all): 11

Other results?:



posted on Jan, 22 2011 @ 10:00 AM
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Nice find mate.

I think there may be more to this.

Here's a scenario for you;

A grid-work of electromagnets is secreted under the court.

The balls in play are 'specially' manufactured, and include very fine strips of either neodymium or just plain old ferrous metal foil, inside the ball (the weight would remain the same as a normal ball).

The match is played and huge sums are bet on the outcome.

The grid is monitored, and activated either (probably) by computer or manually at the appropriate moment, in order to cause a momentary 'hiccup' in the bounce or direction of the ball and wrong-foot the player you're betting against.

Sports are rigged all over the planet, it's not such a 'tin foil' conspiracy to assume the same is true of tennis.

Perhaps on this occasion, the computer controlling the electromagnetic grid buried under the court, went haywire and left a grid element (electromagnet) activated. The 'acted out' drilling holes in the court surface may have simply coincided with the grid operator resetting the computer or turning off that particular electromagnet, and making it appear as though an air bubble was the cause.

It would be quite easy to accomplish this fiddle, technologically speaking.
edit on 22/1/2011 by spikey because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 22 2011 @ 01:30 PM
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reply to post by Aggie Man
 


Can you try your expierment on a 'hard surface', (like a tennis court is), because I am not seeing how your results are relevant when done on a 'soft surface', (like a pillow), when the original occurance, (as seen in the video), happened on a hard surface. Isn't that apple and oranges?


Bzzzzzzz





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