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Jeff Immelt to chair the White House's job panel: Is this somebody's sick idea of a joke?

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posted on Jan, 21 2011 @ 01:33 PM
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Putting General Electric's Jeff Immelt in charge of job creation is like choosing Dr. Hannibal Lecter to head the national mental health panel.



"[Immelt] runs a big company, but Immelt has shown more skill at cutting jobs, frankly, than creating. GE finished 2009 with 18,000 fewer US workers than it had at the end of 2008, and US headcount is down 31,000 since Immelt's first full year in 2002. During his tenure, GE workers based in the US as a percentage of total employees has fallen to 44%...


More at source.


edit on 1/21/11 by silent thunder because: (no reason given)




posted on Jan, 21 2011 @ 01:51 PM
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reply to post by silent thunder
 


Big business and big government are bedmates.

GE makes the vast majority of its profits through government funding.

Its medical equipment is bought with Medicare dollars.

Its weapons and engine systems are bought with defense dollars.

And its electric equipment is purchased with utilities dollars.

I'm sure Immelt's ideas about creating jobs line up squarely with your own.

OH, and lets not forget its "green technology" - which is all subsidized with your tax dollars.


edit on 21-1-2011 by mnemeth1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 21 2011 @ 01:53 PM
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Originally posted by silent thunder
Putting General Electric's Jeff Immelt in charge of job creation is like choosing Dr. Hannibal Lecter to head the national mental health panel.



"[Immelt] runs a big company, but Immelt has shown more skill at cutting jobs, frankly, than creating. GE finished 2009 with 18,000 fewer US workers than it had at the end of 2008, and US headcount is down 31,000 since Immelt's first full year in 2002. During his tenure, GE workers based in the US as a percentage of total employees has fallen to 44%...


More at source.


edit on 1/21/11 by silent thunder because: (no reason given)


ST, I like your posts... but I just had to poke at your analogy...

Because technically, Hannibal Lecter was a brilliant doctor...


But, you are right in what you were trying to say... this is like asking the fox to guard the hen house.

S&F for the post.


~Namaste



posted on Jan, 21 2011 @ 02:17 PM
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reply to post by silent thunder
 



Something tells me that this panel will identify several "key roadblocks to job creation".

1. U.S. Minimum wage laws make domestic labor "unable to compete" with cheap foreign slave labor.
2. U.S. Tax Structures on corporations will be shown as massively restrictive to growth.
3. Unions will be thoroughly villified.
4. A wide variety of labor protection laws will be put on the chopping block in the name of giving America back it's ability to compete.

Basically, more blackmail from the corporate elites who are "too afraid to hire" in the face of "uncertainty" about just how much they can fatten their bottom lines.

This syncs perfectly with Obama's pledge in the WSJ to cut down on "excess" government regulation of our corporate overlords.



posted on Jan, 21 2011 @ 02:29 PM
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reply to post by RobertAntonWeishaupt
 


You make it sound as if high taxes and high minimum wage are responsible for creating jobs.

Minimum wage laws are the product of union lobbyists by the way.

The whole point is to prevent non-union competitors from being able to hire workers at a competitive wage that undercuts the unions.



edit on 21-1-2011 by mnemeth1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 21 2011 @ 02:42 PM
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reply to post by mnemeth1
 


No, but they are fundamental to maintaining a certain quality of life that the majority of the population has grown accustomed to.

Now, don't get me wrong. I'm aware of the theory of a true free market wherein there is no need for minimum wage because the forces of the market would reach a natural equilibrium where productive workers will be paid a proper living wage etc etc etc.

I also know that such a world does not exist. Just as a perfect collectivist utopia is impossible. A company could create a million jobs, but if those jobs are only at 3 bucks an hour, then they do nothing for the true economy as they will not do anything to create a consumer class.

Staunch Capitalists' delusions that we live in a world that is inclined towards some sort of meritocracy are pathological and naive. Those who hold the purse strings will almost never pay more for excellence when they can get barely adequate for much much less. And the consumers lack the willpower to use their buying power to demand better goods (which would be made by better-paid workers who have ascended through the ranks of the the meritocracy). The sheeple are too used to quantity over quality. So the collective lift of a culture of higher expectations has been beaten out of our culture.

So sure, abolishing unions, removing the minimum wage and cutting taxes to the corporations will create more "jobs," but the quality and benefits of those jobs will be suspect at best as the sweat shop conditions of China make their way to our shores without the massive government support system to mitigate the workers' quality of life.



posted on Jan, 21 2011 @ 02:46 PM
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reply to post by RobertAntonWeishaupt
 


You know what is fundamental to maintaining a certain quality of life?

Having an economy that actually produces stuff.



posted on Jan, 21 2011 @ 03:00 PM
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Originally posted by mnemeth1
reply to post by RobertAntonWeishaupt
 


You know what is fundamental to maintaining a certain quality of life?

Having an economy that actually produces stuff.



Agreed.

But the system has been irrevocably gamed. We are so far gone from anything resembling a proper capitalist, production-based society that applying sane capitalist principles is essentially impossible. The distribution of wealth is not only obscenely lop-sided but not even remotely based on merit or productivity. The monetary system is a joke. Wealth is defined in the abstract and the wealthy have their money tied up in perceptions (the stock market), promises (bonds and t-bills) and fallacies (trace amounts of cash). The system can not be converted to ANY pure model until it self-destructs, but the ruling elites will always right the twisted ship just enough to keep us all from drowning.

There is nothing that can be done to return the United States to a production based society without hitting a massive reset button on everything that defines quality of life.

Meanwhile, the corporate elites, confident that their rogue practices will never have any real consequences seek to always line their pockets further (even beyond the realm of obscenely opulent lifestyles), at the cost of any one "below" them.
edit on 21-1-2011 by RobertAntonWeishaupt because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 21 2011 @ 03:27 PM
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reply to post by RobertAntonWeishaupt
 


Yeah, its gamed because government is sticking guns in everyones face.

Your notion that some how capitalism is to blame for this is ridiculous.

Capitalism does not involve violent expropriation of property and regulation at gun point.

edit on 21-1-2011 by mnemeth1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 21 2011 @ 03:43 PM
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reply to post by mnemeth1
 


I'm not blaming capitalism for the current state of affairs. We have never had a pure capitalist society anywhere on this planet and therefore capitalism can not be blamed for anything bad or lauded for anything good.

What I am saying is that the current state of affairs make the implementation of true capitalism impossible. The playing field is too skewed. Removing government from the equation will not give you pure capitalism because the corporate elites who run things are not capitalists. They are oligarchs. In a meritocracy these people would be eviscerated because they can not contribute to a real capital production-based bottom line. They will only continue the shell game, stealing from the actual producers under the guise of capitalism.

edit on 21-1-2011 by RobertAntonWeishaupt because: grammar tweak



posted on Jan, 21 2011 @ 03:52 PM
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Jeff Immelt is the poster child for the military industrial complex. G.E. has been in bed with the present administration from the get go. N.B.C. as well as M.S.N.B.C are sub section companies of G.E. With all the corporate /government ties G.E. has with the Obama administration,I find it odd that Immelt wasn't made chief of staff,sec.of state,sec.of the treasury and all round grand puba of the White House in Jan of 2009.



posted on Jan, 21 2011 @ 04:10 PM
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Look, in all seriousness, the best thing the "messiah" could do for the economy would be to fire all his czars and advisers, the he and biden resign. A socialist planned economy does not work. This nominee of his has led the charge in outsourcing jobs. How is such a person going to help increase jobs in the USA? He may, likely will, increase job growth....in China, Taiwan, South Korea, India etc... but in the US? I doubt it. We need to renounce all these "free trade agreements", institute punitive tariffs(especially on China) and completely revise(if not eliminate) our income tax code.



posted on Jan, 21 2011 @ 04:48 PM
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reply to post by RobertAntonWeishaupt
 


Free markets are never impossible.

This is like saying freedom is impossible.

The government is going to go away here soon after the dollar is destroyed, I think then we will see a return to some normalcy after the looting violent criminals have their guns taken away.



posted on Jan, 21 2011 @ 04:54 PM
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reply to post by mnemeth1
 


On a brighter note, we should all invest in GE and get rich, because most of the jobs created will come from government dollars increasing the quantity of GE contracts.



posted on Jan, 21 2011 @ 05:03 PM
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Originally posted by mnemeth1
reply to post by RobertAntonWeishaupt
 


Free markets are never impossible.

This is like saying freedom is impossible.

The government is going to go away here soon after the dollar is destroyed, I think then we will see a return to some normalcy after the looting violent criminals have their guns taken away.


And there you hit on a pre-requisite of sort: the death of the dollar, and along with it the entire false market in perceptions and promises that facilitates non-productive accumulation of wealth which skews behaviors and causes a break down of the meritocracy. If we really get the Big Reset Button, then sure, capitalism will be possible.

However, I believe that there are very powerful forces at work who will always find ways to keep our sorry bastardized system afloat. I hope you're right, but I ain't holding my breath.



posted on Jan, 22 2011 @ 02:10 AM
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Have you heard?

States like New York, Illinois and California are talking about BANKRUPTCY!

Think about that for a moment.

Now go out and buy some munies like Cramer has told you over the years.







 
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