Supernova about to give Earth a second sun.

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posted on Jan, 19 2011 @ 02:54 PM
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reply to post by Krusty the Klown
 


Correct me if I am wrong, but that is about 640 light years from us. Meaning we won't see it happen until 640 years from now.




posted on Jan, 19 2011 @ 03:00 PM
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Wow !


This is the first time i have heard of this! that would be spectacular to see!

Thank you for posting S&F



posted on Jan, 19 2011 @ 03:04 PM
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Originally posted by Krusty the Klown

Originally posted by theRhenn
If it's 640 light years away, I would think that it would take litteraly 640 years to be seen by us. Not in our lifetimes, folx.


I think you might be looking at this from the wrong perspective.

If we can see it and it took place 640 years ago that means the event took place 640 years ago we are just seeing it now.

If the star exploded right this minute, the image or light of the event would take 640 years to reach planet Earth for us to see it.

So when it does go supernova there will be a 640 year wait for us to see it.



Perhaps i'm wrong, but it seems that, since we're seeing this "up close" with a telescope. Perception doesnt begind at the eye if you're using a magnifying instrument to see it. In a sense, you're defying the speed of light.
edit on 19-1-2011 by theRhenn because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 19 2011 @ 03:18 PM
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reply to post by theRhenn
 


Uhm, a telescope does not speed up time, or allow you to see ahead in time. Look at this way, a telescope takes the images at the front end of the telescope, where the glass is, and makes them look really big at the back end of the telescope. What you are seeing in a telescope is exactly the same as what you would see with the naked eye, just enlarged. No modification of the speed of light is taking place, trust me.



posted on Jan, 19 2011 @ 03:37 PM
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isn't this thread kinda pointless seen as at any moment a star in the galaxy could go supernova giving us a second sun for a period of time.



posted on Jan, 19 2011 @ 03:41 PM
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Great post Krusty! Thanks. If this thing collapses on itself and creates a black hole, don't we get a gamma ray bust shooting straight out from both poles on it's axis? If so, if either of it's poles are pointed at Earth, given the distance, I wonder what the effect would be? If it's close enough, we'd be fried. Anyway my intuition is that all is as it is supposed to be. I have no feelings of gloom and doom. I know that what is about to happen will exceed all of our wildest dreams. So don't worry! Know that God/The Creator loves you.



posted on Jan, 19 2011 @ 03:41 PM
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great article s&f this is so just a cover for nibiru, just some story to refer back to when you see nibiru getting closer and its visible they can say no, that's not nibiru , that's just a supernova that's all!



posted on Jan, 19 2011 @ 03:43 PM
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reply to post by matrix12
 


I was thinking the same thing when this was first put up



posted on Jan, 19 2011 @ 03:49 PM
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reply to post by Ahmose
 


I'll agree with you on this. If we could see the entire universe in real-time, I believe we'd see supernovaes going off all over the place.

Some would look at a super nova as the end of a stars life. It's theorised that our Sun is the product of a supernovae twice over.

I look at it as necessary for the creation of the heavier elements.



posted on Jan, 19 2011 @ 04:07 PM
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This thread is very interesting s&f

So I've had a search around for a more credible source but like a previous poster stated, the link to space.com dose not work!!

Anyway another article i came across from The RepublicanHerald did sound more plausible and more close to what to expect when this happens.

A few facts about Betelgeuse:


At the other corner of Orion is without a doubt the biggest single thing you've ever seen, Betelgeuse. It's more than 20 times the mass and more than 1,100 times the diameter of our sun, giving Betelgeuse an estimated girth of about one billion miles across. It's so large that if you put it in the place of our sun in our solar system, the planets Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars and even Jupiter would be living inside Betelgeuse





Betelgeuse's diameter and reddish hue are due to the fact that it's already near the end of its very short life. Most astronomers estimate that Betelgeuse isn't much more than a few million years old and it's already expended its hydrogen and helium fuel to the point where it's puffed out in the red giant phase of its brief life. No one really knows for sure, but in maybe less than 10,000 years, a thousand years, or even next year, it could blow itself up in a tremendous supernova explosion, making it brighter than the full moon in our night skies for several weeks. It's a good thing that Betelgeuse is more than 400 light years away from Earth because if it was much closer, it could make for a really bad day here on Earth. In fact, it's believed by many astronomers that if Betelgeuse exploded within a hundred light years of Earth, the radiation from the blast could change or eliminate life as we know it on our planet. Keep your distance, Betelgeuse!


2011 seem to be the year for looking to the Heavens!!



posted on Jan, 19 2011 @ 04:22 PM
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Might Betelgeuse Go BOOM?
www.rense.com...

Betelgeuse BOOM - Calamitas Apocalyptica
www.rense.com...

Both Betelgeuse And Antares - Update
www.rense.com...

Earth Has NO PLAN To Avoid Extinction
www.rense.com...

Earth Still Has No Plan To Avoid Extinction
www.rense.com...



posted on Jan, 19 2011 @ 04:28 PM
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Originally posted by dalepmay
reply to post by Krusty the Klown
 


Correct me if I am wrong, but that is about 640 light years from us. Meaning we won't see it happen until 640 years from now.


That's correct. If Betelgeuse went supernova right now, it would take 640 years for the light to reach us.

So when we do see it happen it will have happened 640 years ago.

As a previous poster said, it could have already happened 100 years ago and we just haven't seen it yet.



posted on Jan, 19 2011 @ 04:35 PM
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Originally posted by theRhenn

Originally posted by Krusty the Klown

Originally posted by theRhenn
If it's 640 light years away, I would think that it would take litteraly 640 years to be seen by us. Not in our lifetimes, folx.


I think you might be looking at this from the wrong perspective.

If we can see it and it took place 640 years ago that means the event took place 640 years ago we are just seeing it now.

If the star exploded right this minute, the image or light of the event would take 640 years to reach planet Earth for us to see it.

So when it does go supernova there will be a 640 year wait for us to see it.



Perhaps i'm wrong, but it seems that, since we're seeing this "up close" with a telescope. Perception doesnt begind at the eye if you're using a magnifying instrument to see it. In a sense, you're defying the speed of light.
edit on 19-1-2011 by theRhenn because: (no reason given)


You can only see events as they unfold to your eye no matter what, a bit like a movie already made and being viewed later, except you can't know the plot in advance, or know exactly how the movie was made.
edit on 19-1-2011 by smurfy because: Text.



posted on Jan, 19 2011 @ 04:42 PM
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reply to post by Krusty the Klown
 


Interesting although I have a hard time understanding how this would not be harmful to humans. I'm under the impression that if there were 2 soons than it would be twice as hot? Perhaps we would be confined to underground cities for awhile? Oh this is normal you say? Oh okay than. Continue on.



posted on Jan, 19 2011 @ 04:54 PM
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reply to post by packinupngoin
 


The 2 suns quote is really more sensational journalism more than anything. Basically anything that is 640 light years away the energy would be so massively diluted it would have little to no effect heatwise. Think of it the same way we are not effected by other distant suns.



posted on Jan, 19 2011 @ 05:09 PM
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reply to post by LifeInDeath
 


LifeInDeath - Thanks for posting what is, so far, the most accurate post about this event. If Betelgeuse did go supernova about 640 years ago, we would just now begin to see it. Even if we were using telescopes. Even through the Hubble. Using a telescope will not let you see the event any sooner than just using your naked eyes. Betelgeuse is too far away and not pointed at us in the right way to cause any damage whatsoever. If we are fortunate enough to be witnesses to this event, it would certainly be spectacular to see - but it would not "turn day into night". According to estimates by Professor J. Craig Wheeler of The University of Texas at Austin in the Wiki link, the supernova "could brighten to an apparent magnitude of −12 over a two-week period, then remain at that intensity for 2 to 3 months before rapidly dimming". The mean apparent magnitude of the full moon is -12.74, so the two would be about the same brightness. I suppose the two combined would be bright enough to read outside at night to, but not just like daylight.

So while it would be awesome to see, you would not need to hide in a cave or an underground bunker or anything like that.



posted on Jan, 19 2011 @ 05:11 PM
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to the OP...
I don't think you've considered the light years distance away that this star is.
so if it's 'about' to go supernova then it is only 'about to' from our viewing perspective...
where in reality.. it already happened several thousand years ago? (guessing) ..and we're only now just viewing the event because the light of the event has just now only reached us...

this has already been posted no doubt.

i hope... otherwise i have lost trust in the brains of ATS members.

-



posted on Jan, 19 2011 @ 05:16 PM
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reply to post by Krusty the Klown
 


and what effects would a second sun have on earth and its residents?



posted on Jan, 19 2011 @ 05:25 PM
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Originally posted by Stargate2012
I think if this explodes it would be the "Blue Star"

And I have a theory due to some research as to when this might actually explode!

This is the star of Wormwood!
edit on 19-1-2011 by Stargate2012 because: (no reason given)


Okay man, now im starting to think you're right..
www.sacred-texts.com...

Remember in the movie beetleguise.. they say his name THREE times? Well.. this third trumpet is wormwood. Which is supposed to be a star. Crap dude... I hate it when this stuff makes sense.



posted on Jan, 19 2011 @ 05:25 PM
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reply to post by Krusty the Klown
 


If another light the size of our sun appears I would think it wouldn't matter how far away it was it would produce heat here on earth and cause the temp to rise during the 2 to 3 weeks it was there. I don't know about anyone else but I wouldn't want to be near costal areas and some good shade would be nice.
edit on 19-1-2011 by LightSource because: Forgot to add the word "rise" and removed word "alot"





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