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Supernova about to give Earth a second sun.

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posted on Jan, 22 2011 @ 05:42 PM
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reply to post by Krusty the Klown
 


I understand about regularly being bombarded with neutrinos from our own sun but isn't it possible that neutrinos from a supernova could be mutated? If it is possible, would they still be harmless?

Thanks for replying by the way, I appreciate it




posted on Jan, 22 2011 @ 06:15 PM
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reply to post by Spinster
 


Right now i am eating humble pie.

This is a repsonse to my originaly post (page 7) claiming this yet to be yet another doomsdayer or naysayer, from what ive seen recent images of betelgeuse puffing off its outer layers, and from my amateur stargazing have seen betelgeuse almost invisible to the naked eye, a star which was once the brightest and stood out in the constellation.

To the OP Krusty the Klown i apoligize right now, and agree with your original post that we could be seeing the resulting light burts from the supernova from any time now, well within give or take a few decades or so
.



posted on Jan, 22 2011 @ 06:30 PM
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Well Betelgeuse is the ninth biggest star in our Galaxy.

It won't be a Supernova, it will be a Hypernova that may give birth to a black hole.

Either way it is close enough and big enough to give us a serious Gamma ray suntan.!!

Cosmic...



posted on Jan, 22 2011 @ 07:00 PM
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reply to post by Krusty the Klown
 


One of the articles I read said they could tell by the light emission signature that the core was losing mass rapidly.
We don't have any recorded events like this to compare against but you would think some astronomers somewhere could interpolate changing data and determine if and when the superNova occurred. Centuries ago forecasting an event like this could win a war or even inspire a NWO. We don't have the resources to guess when this event will occur to even within 100,000 years do we?



posted on Jan, 22 2011 @ 08:12 PM
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Originally posted by Cosmic4life
Well Betelgeuse is the ninth biggest star in our Galaxy.


Try again. Ninth *brightest* in the night sky, second brightest in Orion. It's *one* of the biggest known stars in the known universe.


It won't be a Supernova, it will be a Hypernova that may give birth to a black hole.


Citation?


Either way it is close enough and big enough to give us a serious Gamma ray suntan.!!

Cosmic...


Again.....citation? Its poles are pointed away from the Earth, effectively rendering any GRB a total non-threat to us as far as we understand the mechanics of GRBs.



posted on Jan, 22 2011 @ 08:12 PM
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Originally posted by Bordon81
reply to post by Krusty the Klown
 


One of the articles I read said they could tell by the light emission signature that the core was losing mass rapidly.
We don't have any recorded events like this to compare against but you would think some astronomers somewhere could interpolate changing data and determine if and when the superNova occurred. Centuries ago forecasting an event like this could win a war or even inspire a NWO. We don't have the resources to guess when this event will occur to even within 100,000 years do we?


Yes, we have at least 3 hours warning. Google "SNEWS"



posted on Jan, 22 2011 @ 08:41 PM
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It would be a site to see. One morning you wake up and see another huge bright object in the sky.

I think I'd first be scared, then amazed and then I'd end up pissed. I hate driving to work at 7 am with a huge bright light in my eyes...I couldn't imagine two.



posted on Jan, 22 2011 @ 09:07 PM
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Originally posted by sephrenia
reply to post by 00nunya00
 


Have you got any links that I could go and look at about neutrino emissions and the effects they could have? I have to admit, I've definitely become more interested in the subject since watching 2012 and this supernova has only reinforced it for me



edit on 22-1-2011 by sephrenia because: missing words


Sure!

MIT

Stanford

IAS



posted on Jan, 22 2011 @ 11:26 PM
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Overhyped topic. There's likely at least a thousand stars that will be visible from Earth that will go supernova "in a million years"...



posted on Jan, 22 2011 @ 11:55 PM
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reply to post by sephrenia
 


I can't edit my last post, but I wanted to add to your reply:

It's funny, because the IAS paper describes a lab very much like the one in 2012, and I'm thinking this might have been the inspiration for the whole deep-lab/neutrino/boiling water basis for the movie (in the beginning scene). I didn't watch this movie until a few months ago because I was disgusted at the way 2012 was being exploited and hyped by the media (I was into the Mayan calendar when I was a teenager, over 16 years ago, before most people had even heard of it, and I feel its exploitation is tragic. It has answers, but not the ones most people are looking for.) I was impressed by the cinematics, as I'm a huge sucker for tidal wave catastrophe scenes, but I felt it was a silly mishmash of differing theories, many of which are contradictory to each other, and few of which have any good scientific basis. I wish people would stop taking ideas like Hapgood's and just stopping there----"He was right" or "he was crazy" instead of "maybe he was on the right track, but not quite right----let's re-examine it with an open, inspired mind." Unfortunately, it's not up to the debunker to come up with the right idea, just to shoot down the wrong ones. If more debunkers were in it with an open mind and not so much disdain for for-out ideas, maybe "we could have come so very far, in at least as many years," as Phish says. But the attitude is "I'm right, you're wrong" and not "let's try to figure this out together; maybe we're both right, or both wrong." We should know a lot more about everything, including supernovas and neutrinos, but the competitive attitude that makes science great also handicaps it sometimes.

Here's the quote that makes me think it was the inspiration (the paper is from 1996):

Each of these detectors was conceived and is being built by a sizable international collaboration. Each is housed in an underground laboratory shielded from cosmic ray products other than neutrinos and very energetic muons by a mile or so of earth. Super Kamiokande, the most massive of the three, is a 50-kiloton water-Cerenkov detector.

(From the IAS link in my post above about the neutrino links)



posted on Jan, 22 2011 @ 11:58 PM
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Originally posted by MasonicFantom
Overhyped topic. There's likely at least a thousand stars that will be visible from Earth that will go supernova "in a million years"...


LOL, overused and tired reply and reaction. There's absolutely nothing "overhyped" about supernovas; they happen all the time throughout our universe and even closer to our galaxy and within it, affect us constantly in varying ways, and have shaped history in ways we are just beginning to understand (not the least of which is the social effect).

The only thing that's overhyped is radical skepticism. Skepticism most certainly has its place, but no one ever made a discovery telling other people their research was stupid and to give it up. That's, in fact, what set us back for centuries around the time of Galileo.



posted on Jan, 23 2011 @ 04:34 AM
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I recall looking into the danger posed by Supernovas several years ago and the consensus at that time from the scientific community was that for a Supernova to be dangerous to life on earth it would need to be within 25 light years of us. It is a different ballgame I believe if the Supernova is a HyperSupernova as I think anywhere in our galaxy may pose a threat dependent on the direction of the gamma ray bursts

It would be interesting to know how many stars are within that 25 light years distance and whether any of them are candidates to go Supernova? Also any known stars in our own galaxy which may go HyperSupernova?

science.nasa.gov...

Interestingly, there was a programme I watched on the TV yesterday called "Journey to the end of the Universe" and it mentioned at one point that it may have been a nearby Supernova which wiped out the dinosaurs - I thought they were wiped out as a result of an asteroid hit - clearly there appears to still be some debate about this matter and the theory they were wiped out as a result of a Supernova suggests that at about that time there may be evidence of a nearby Supernova occurring? Perhaps it was a HyperSupernova?



posted on Jan, 23 2011 @ 04:38 AM
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does this mean my curtains would fade faster from all that sunlight?



posted on Jan, 23 2011 @ 04:39 AM
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Nice topic, expect this won't happen in our life times, hell our grandchildren either.



posted on Jan, 23 2011 @ 05:31 AM
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Originally posted by Intelearthling
Not really. Caves, basements and underground installations would stop gamma rays. Thing about it though is that people underground would run out of food before the radiation subsided.

Be prepared.


Apparently, we are in no risk of a GRB as the axial tilt of the star is wrong. Radiation levels should remain close to background.



Originally posted by theRhenn
If it's 640 light years away, I would think that it would take litteraly 640 years to be seen by us. Not in our lifetimes, folx.


I think you misnuderstand. They are looking at the star as it was 640 years ago, so any clues as to it's imminent death are being seen, they are 640 years old. If it then explodes, that too happened 640 years ago. they're not watching it in real time, are they?



posted on Jan, 23 2011 @ 05:38 AM
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reply to post by Aeonflux
 


Cool link, thanks. From Wiki on Hypernovae:

The radiation output of a nearby hypernova could cause serious harm to Earth, however no known hypergiant is located close enough to Earth to pose a threat.


Source



 
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edit on Sun Jan 23 2011 by Jbird because: quote to Reply to:



posted on Jan, 23 2011 @ 05:41 AM
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Originally posted by Gakus
Nice topic, expect this won't happen in our life times, hell our grandchildren either.


Perhaps you should inform NASA and the folks at SNEWS that you have devised a way to predict the appearance of supernovae. They have spent a lot of time and energy trying to do just this, but it appears you have a source which makes you privy to absolute certainty that none of us will be alive when this happens? Can I see your source?



posted on Jan, 23 2011 @ 06:09 AM
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Originally posted by MasonicFantom
Overhyped topic. There's likely at least a thousand stars that will be visible from Earth that will go supernova "in a million years"...


Not many quite so close or so massive, mind.

This one is significant because when it does go pop, it will rival the moon in terms of size and brightness.



posted on Jan, 23 2011 @ 07:06 AM
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Originally posted by 00nunya00

Originally posted by Cosmic4life
Well Betelgeuse is the ninth biggest star in our Galaxy.


Try again. Ninth *brightest* in the night sky, second brightest in Orion. It's *one* of the biggest known stars in the known universe.


It won't be a Supernova, it will be a Hypernova that may give birth to a black hole.


Citation?


Either way it is close enough and big enough to give us a serious Gamma ray suntan.!!

Cosmic...


Again.....citation? Its poles are pointed away from the Earth, effectively rendering any GRB a total non-threat to us as far as we understand the mechanics of GRBs.


OK let me explain it to you in full smartypants.!!


Based on current figures (subject to revision).

Top 10 Biggest Stars..Measured by Solar Radii..SR.

1.VY Canis Majoris. 1800-2100 SR.
2.VV Cephei. 1600-1900 SR.
3.V838 Monocerotis. 1570 SR. (New in at #3)
4.WOH G64. 1540 SR.
5.V354 Cephei. 1520 SR.
6.RW Cephei. 1260-1610 SR.
7.KW Sagittarii. 1460 SR.
8.KY Cygni. 1420 SR.
9.Mu Cephei. 1420 SR. (Was #3 at 1550 SR.)
10.Betelgeuse.(Alpha Orionis) 1000-1200 SR. (Was #9 until V838 added)

Top 10 Brightest Stars..Measured by Magnitude.

1.Sirius.
2.Canopus.
3.Alpha Centauri.
4.Arcturus.
5.Vega.
6.Capella.
7.Rigel.
8.Procyon.
9.Achernar.
10.Betelgeuse.

At present the direction of Betelgeuse's polar alignment is a guesstimate.
And like most cosmic bodies (The Earth, The Sun.) the magnetic field is subject to change of direction and polarity.
So nobody knows where the polarised GRB will go or even if there will be a polarized GRB in the form of a beam.
Betelgeuse is theoretically large enough to cause an Isometric explosion with the Gamma rays expanding out in a spherical shockwave.

And stop asking me for citations, you have a mouse and a finger, use them wisely.

Cosmic...



posted on Jan, 23 2011 @ 08:43 AM
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Uh, yeah. Radius and mass are totally different things (and its visible brightness has nothing to do with anything as far as determining its explosion), and BG is NOT a hypernova nor a candidate for one. Do a little research on just Wikipedia about Hypernovae before you go asserting this. It's visibly big, sure----but it's not even in the top 50 stars for MASS which is what dictates what happens when it explodes.

Show me one single source that lists BG as a candidate for Hypernova? It would have to be a Hypergiant, which it is NOT.



 
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edit on Sun Jan 23 2011 by Jbird because: removed quote of previous post




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