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Supernova about to give Earth a second sun.

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posted on Jan, 21 2011 @ 06:10 PM
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Originally posted by bekod
for give for not reading the hole thread but from page 11 to this last one no one has said a thing about the possibility of a black hole, if it is in this thread then i will say no more.


I have been thinking this as well. What if? Could there be a black hole near or between Sirius A and Betelgeuse? Somewhere between "US" and "THEM.?"

After looking at the FERMI (Gamma) survey on WWTelescope and comparing them with IRAS images, why does there appear that material is being "pulled" or "siphoned-off" the star's surfaces? And why the odd "pixelated blue" distortions which look like lens flares or distortions? Odd refractions or faulty image processing and stitching them together?

If not or if so, Betelgeuse still looks as if it is very fragile and about ready to implode and explode from the looks of the picture below.


Note: Scientists say the "layer" surrounding the star is a "silicate layer" which has solidified and formed around it, much like a cocoon, pardon the analogy.
edit on 21-1-2011 by trekwebmaster because: Additional information...




posted on Jan, 21 2011 @ 06:39 PM
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reply to post by Skywatcher2011
 
just want to say thanks just what is was looking for, good post and S for you.now off to find more.



posted on Jan, 21 2011 @ 06:50 PM
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Originally posted by trekwebmaster

Originally posted by bekod
for give for not reading the hole thread but from page 11 to this last one no one has said a thing about the possibility of a black hole, if it is in this thread then i will say no more.


I have been thinking this as well. What if? Could there be a black hole near or between Sirius A and Betelgeuse? Somewhere between "US" and "THEM.?"

After looking at the FERMI (Gamma) survey on WWTelescope and comparing them with IRAS images, why does there appear that material is being "pulled" or "siphoned-off" the star's surfaces? And why the odd "pixelated blue" distortions which look like lens flares or distortions? Odd refractions or faulty image processing and stitching them together?

If not or if so, Betelgeuse still looks as if it is very fragile and about ready to implode and explode from the looks of the picture below.


Note: Scientists say the "layer" surrounding the star is a "silicate layer" which has solidified and formed around it, much like a cocoon, pardon the analogy.
edit on 21-1-2011 by trekwebmaster because: Additional information...


Am I looking at an image of betelgeuse with a shell around it?


Like a Dyson sphere maybe?

Thats a crazy image



posted on Jan, 21 2011 @ 06:58 PM
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reply to post by Khaaaaaan!!
 


From what I can glean from remarks about the "silicate layer," it would seem this layer is composed of "lighter" elements which were used as fuel in the star's energy production. An end-result of the expansion / contraction process? It's not known how long this "process of crystalization" in this "silicate layer" has been going on.

I'd figure, that the lighter elements would burn off first, after the primary sources of fuel were gone. Could this by analogous to using "super-glue" which is heated and vaporized in a closed container to extract fingerprints, but on a grander scale, perhaps?

No telling how long this has been occurring, but indeed, time will "tell."



posted on Jan, 21 2011 @ 07:12 PM
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Here is a follow up article from the same news site as the original article in the OP.

www.news.com.au

Different space experts say this event may not be imminent after all.

I still hope it does pop next week though.



posted on Jan, 21 2011 @ 07:14 PM
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reply to post by Khaaaaaan!!
 
i has been a while, so bear with me, think of this star as an onion,as each layer burns, as it uses up its fuel it burps, and sends off the unused particles, as each one pulses like your heart thump thump, it, the star, grows and with each growth, an other one layer get's flung off into space, this is what you see in the pic, then after all the fuel is used up boom, the size of the star reflects how big of a boom thus in turn leads to a new sun, or black hole, depending on core make up until that fuel is used up then you get into pulsars and other types of remnants that as once a star. i hope that helped. please bear in mind this is all from memory and not a text book.




posted on Jan, 21 2011 @ 07:22 PM
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reply to post by Krusty the Klown
 
well it could go today or 1000 years form now it all depends on how fast it uses up it's fuel, one indication would be if it got 10 times its size that it is know or is a lager amount , anyway that is the sign that it is dying, an dis ready to explode or implode one makes a sun the other a black hole. but i have a theory on that as well.and usually someone beats me to it.



posted on Jan, 21 2011 @ 07:26 PM
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Everything in this universe is connected despite appearances. Ray Bradbury was right with his book A Sound of Thunder which later became The Butterfly Effect. On a sub-atomic level all things are connected.



posted on Jan, 22 2011 @ 01:33 AM
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Originally posted by bekod
for give for not reading the hole thread but from page 11 to this last one no one has said a thing about the possibility of a black hole, if it is in this thread then i will say no more.


Because of its estimated size, it sits on the threshold between just going neutron star, and going black hole. But if it does go black hole, it will be extremely small----and have less gravitational impact upon us than the original star did, at least at first. Probably nothing to worry about for many, many, many lifetimes.
edit on 22-1-2011 by 00nunya00 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 22 2011 @ 01:42 AM
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Originally posted by bekod
reply to post by Krusty the Klown
 
well it could go today or 1000 years form now it all depends on how fast it uses up it's fuel, one indication would be if it got 10 times its size that it is know or is a lager amount , anyway that is the sign that it is dying, an dis ready to explode or implode one makes a sun the other a black hole. but i have a theory on that as well.and usually someone beats me to it.



It has already gone through its growing phase, and is now in the late stages and shrinking, which is why we know the SN is imminent (relatively). This process of shrinking is because it is fusing heavier elements, which will eventually result in an iron core, which cannot be used for making more energy, and it collapses, sending energy outward which results in the explosion as we think of it (it's a bit more complicated, but that's good enough for now). The next time we see it grow, it will be when it goes SN.

Edited to add: the process of its death will be the same, and results in the two different outcomes of neutron star or black hole based on its mass at the time of collapse. It's not two different processes for forming neutron stars or black holes (in terms of the original star's explosion and collapse that creates the conditions for either to occur----the formation of either after this initial explosion and collapse, of course, is different).
edit on 22-1-2011 by 00nunya00 because: (no reason given)

edit on 22-1-2011 by 00nunya00 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 22 2011 @ 01:58 AM
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Originally posted by bekod
reply to post by Khaaaaaan!!
 
i has been a while, so bear with me, think of this star as an onion,as each layer burns, as it uses up its fuel it burps, and sends off the unused particles, as each one pulses like your heart thump thump, it, the star, grows and with each growth, an other one layer get's flung off into space, this is what you see in the pic, then after all the fuel is used up boom, the size of the star reflects how big of a boom thus in turn leads to a new sun, or black hole, depending on core make up until that fuel is used up then you get into pulsars and other types of remnants that as once a star. i hope that helped. please bear in mind this is all from memory and not a text book.



Nope. Type II Supernova

Your onion analogy is correct, but it's like watching those layers of the onion form, not seeing them peeled. The layers form because elements fuse into heavier and heavier elements. Instead of "flinging layers off into space," the star is actually trying to keep the layers from collapsing, which is how a white dwarf (and then supernova) is formed.



posted on Jan, 22 2011 @ 02:09 AM
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Originally posted by Khaaaaaan!!

Am I looking at an image of betelgeuse with a shell around it?


Like a Dyson sphere maybe?

Thats a crazy image


Nope.

At about .45 stellar radii (~2−3 AU) above the photosphere, the closest membrane appears to be the molecular layer known as the MOLsphere. Studies show it to be composed of water-vapor and carbon monoxide with an effective temperature of about 1500 ± 500K. Water-vapor had been originally detected in the supergiant's spectrum back in the 1960s with the two Stratoscope projects but had been ignored for decades. Recent studies suggest that the MOLsphere may also contain SiO and Al2O3—molecules which could explain the formation of dust particles.


Just silicon. Not survival satellites from an intelligent life form.
edit on 22-1-2011 by 00nunya00 because: to fix quotes



posted on Jan, 22 2011 @ 08:40 AM
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Now, I'm no scientist (read: flunked it at school), but I do have a question or two for everyone.

In the movie 2012 (yeah, I know), neutrinos from a solar flare mutated and caused the earths core to go bananas. I was wondering, could the neutrinos from the Betelgeuse supernova (whenever it happens) do the same sort of thing? I mean, if there's no escaping the influx of neutrinos from such an event due to them being able to pass through any kind of surface, does it mean such a scenario is viable or is it just stupid movie stuff that I should just ignore?
edit on 22-1-2011 by sephrenia because: Apparently I liked doubling up words... D'oh!



posted on Jan, 22 2011 @ 09:03 AM
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Sorry but this is a really lame cover for something else that will be temporary as well and last about 7 days around that time frame 2012 but hey the ancient civilizations couldn't be right with what they were saying about nibiru could they because they didn't have our technology or satellites but yet this isn't the first time this has happened and it's going to happen again so chuckle laugh deny but 80% of the worlds population will be gone due to man made and natural cataclysms but hey I just wear a tin foil hat right?
look around you and pull your heads out of the computer monitor and start scanning the skies and see whats happening and watch the earth changes too! Flooding try sinking a bit... watch the plates and the interaction within nature.............



posted on Jan, 22 2011 @ 09:20 AM
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Originally posted by sephrenia
Now, I'm no scientist (read: flunked it at school), but I do have a question or two for everyone.

In the movie 2012 (yeah, I know), neutrinos from a solar flare mutated and caused the earths core to go bananas. I was wondering, could the neutrinos from the Betelgeuse supernova (whenever it happens) do the same sort of thing? I mean, if there's no escaping the influx of neutrinos from such an event due to them being able to pass through any kind of surface, does it mean such a scenario is viable or is it just stupid movie stuff that I should just ignore?
edit on 22-1-2011 by sephrenia because: Apparently I liked doubling up words... D'oh!


I asked this on page 1 (maybe 2, I forget). It was ignored, so I guess no one cares whether the neutrinos from BG could be causing the current observed variation in certain isotopes (which is being dismissed as human error, among many different institutions, but which has already been accounted for and dismissed as a cause by those researching it). They're thinking the sun's neutrinos are acting different, or there's a mystery particle just now being ejected from the sun. I wonder if SNe either produce differently-behaving neutrinos, or are the source of the "mystery particle."

Edit: it's funny how the scientists all came out to give interviews about how silly that movie's use of neutrinos was, and how they could never do that because they "never EVER interact with ANYTHING." And now it appears they *might* be looking pretty foolish. Too early to tell, but still.
edit on 22-1-2011 by 00nunya00 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 22 2011 @ 10:47 AM
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reply to post by 00nunya00
 


Have you got any links that I could go and look at about neutrino emissions and the effects they could have? I have to admit, I've definitely become more interested in the subject since watching 2012 and this supernova has only reinforced it for me



edit on 22-1-2011 by sephrenia because: missing words



posted on Jan, 22 2011 @ 12:27 PM
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I can imagine standing outside in the dark of night when this happens, man what a sight to see. All the secrets of the shadows suddenly revealed before ones eyes, undoubtedly a pretty cool thing to experience for a puny human.
edit on 22/1/11 by Droogie because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 22 2011 @ 05:16 PM
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reply to post by sephrenia
 


Planet Earth is constantly bombarded with neutrinos from space and they pass through us and the planet harmlessly.

The difference between now and when this star explodes is that there will be more neutrinos passing through us when it does pop.

According to the experts there will be no danger.



posted on Jan, 22 2011 @ 05:19 PM
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reply to post by Krusty the Klown
 



You mean that they believe it may have already gone supernova a few hundred years ago?

If it went supernova say today...we would not see it for a few hundred years. Its not like we got a probe over there that instantly sends back data telling us what state it is at. We are viewing it as it was that long ago. Because that is how far away it is.



posted on Jan, 22 2011 @ 05:33 PM
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reply to post by Tulkor
 


Correct.

Apparently the star is around 640 light years away, so if it went supernova 500 years ago, it will be another 140 years until we see it pop.



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