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Rig Veda, Hymns about the end of the ice age & glacial melt.

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posted on Jan, 18 2011 @ 06:35 PM
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The Rig Veda is the oldest of the four Vedas. It is a large collection of 1,028 hymns. These were passed down orally before ever being written down. So I do believe it is possible that two of these hymns I have come across do talk about the time at the end of the ice age when the last remaining glaciers were starting to melt. Here is my evidence for this theory:



Rig Veda 5.029

1. MAN'S worship of the Gods hath three great lustres, and three celestial lights have they established
The Maruts gifted with pure strength adore thee, for thou, O Indra, art their sapient Ṛṣi.
2 What time the Maruts sang their song to Indra, joyous when he had drunk of Soma juices,
He grasped his thunderbolt to slay the Dragon, and loosed, that they might flow, the youthful Waters.
3 And, O ye Brahmans, Maruts, so may Indra drink draughts of this my carefully pressed Soma;
For this oblation found for man the cattle, and Indra, having quaffed it, slew the Dragon.
4 Then heaven and earth he sundered and supported: wrapped even in these he struck the Beast with terror.
So Indra forced the Engulfer to disgorgement, and slew the Dānava. panting against him.
5 Thus all the Gods, O Maghavan, delivered to thee of their free will the draught of Soma;
When thou for Etaśa didst cause to tarry the flying mares of Sūrya racing forward.
6 When Maghavan with the thunderbolt demolished his nine-and-ninety castles all together,
The Maruts, where they met, glorified Indra: ye with the Tṛṣṭup hymn obstructed heaven.
7 As friend to aid a friend, Agni dressed quickly three hundred buffaloes, even as he willed it.
And Indra, from man's gift, for Vṛtra's slaughter, drank ofr at once three lakes of pressed-out Soma.
8 When thou three hundred buffaloes' flesh hadst eaten, and drunk, as Maghavan, three lakes of Soma,
All the Gods raised as ’twere a shout of triumph to Indra praise because he slew the Dragon.
9 What time ye came with strong steeds swiftly speeding, O Uśanā and Indra, to the dwelling,
Thou camest thither -conquering together with Kutsa and the Gods: thou slewest Śuṣṇa.
10 One car-wheel of the Sun thou rolledst forward, and one thou settest free to move for Kutsa.
Thou slewest noseless Dasyus with thy weapon, and in their home o’erthrewest hostile speakers.
11 The lauds of Gauriviti made thee mighty to Vidathin's son, as prey, thou gavest Pipru.
Rjisivan drew thee into friendship dressing the sacred food, and thou hast drunk his Soma.
12 Navagvas and Dasgvas with libations of Soma juice sing hymns of praise to Indra.
Labouring at their task the men laid open the stall of Kine though firmly closed and fastened.
13 How shall I serve thee, Maghavan, though knowing full well what hero deeds thou hast accomplished?
And the fresh deeds which thou wilt do, Most Mighty! these, too, will we tell forth in sacred synods.
14 Resistless from of old through hero courage, thou hast done all these many acts, O Indra.
What thou wilt do in bravery, Thunder-wielder! none is there who may hinder this thy prowess.
15 Indra, accept the prayers which now are offered, accept the new prayers, Mightiest! which we utter.
Like fair and well-made robes, I, seeking riches, as a deft craftsman makes a car, have wrought them.
Source


Notice how it says he slew the Dragon and loosed 'the mighty flow, the youthful waters.' Youthful would mean fresh or new waters. It says Indra forced the Engulfer to disgorgement, so here we have clues that large torrents of water would have burst loose. Could the 99 castles mentioned also be reference to glaciers holding back waters?

I'd like to quote from another hymn as more support for this theory:



Rig Vega 1.032

1 I WILL declare the manly deeds of Indra, the first that he achieved, the Thunder-wielder.
He slew the Dragon, then disclosed the waters, and cleft the channels of the mountain torrents.
2 He slew the Dragon lying on the mountain: his heavenly bolt of thunder Tvaṣṭar fashioned.
Like lowing kine in rapid flow descending the waters glided downward to the ocean.

3 Impetuous as a bull, he chose the Soma and in three sacred beakers drank the juices.
Maghavan grasped the thunder for his weapon, and smote to death this firstborn of the dragons.
4 When, Indra, thou hadst slain the dragon's firstborn, and overcome the charms of the enchanters,
Then, giving life to Sun and Dawn and Heaven, thou foundest not one foe to stand against thee.
5 Indra with his own great and deadly thunder smote into pieces Vṛtra, worst of Vṛtras.
As trunks of trees, what time the axe hath felled them, low on the earth so lies the prostrate Dragon.
6 He, like a mad weak warrior, challenged Indra, the great impetuous many-slaying Hero.
He, brooking not the clashing of the weapons, crushed—Indra's foe—the shattered forts in falling.
7 Footless and handless still he challenged Indra, who smote him with his bolt between the shoulders.
Emasculate yet claiming manly vigour, thus Vṛtra lay with scattered limbs dissevered.
8 There as he lies like a bank-bursting river, the waters taking courage flow above him.
The Dragon lies beneath the feet of torrents which Vṛtra with his greatness had encompassed.

9 Then humbled was the strength of Vṛtra's mother: Indra hath cast his deadly bolt against her.
The mother was above, the son was under and like a cow beside her calf lay Danu.
10 Rolled in the midst of never-ceasing currents flowing without a rest for ever onward.
The waters bear off Vṛtra's nameless body: the foe of Indra sank to during darkness.
11 Guarded by Ahi stood the thralls of Dāsas, the waters stayed like kine held by the robber.
But he, when he had smitten Vṛtra, opened the cave wherein the floods had been imprisoned.
12 A horse's tail wast thou when he, O Indra, smote on thy bolt; thou, God without a second,
Thou hast won back the kine, hast won the Soma; thou hast let loose to flow the Seven Rivers.
13 Nothing availed him lightning, nothing thunder, hailstorm or mist which had spread around him:
When Indra and the Dragon strove in battle, Maghavan gained the victory for ever.
14 Whom sawest thou to avenge the Dragon, Indra, that fear possessed thy heart when thou hadst slain him;
That, like a hawk affrighted through the regions, thou crossedst nine-and-ninety flowing rivers?
15 Indra is King of all that moves and moves not, of creatures tame and horned, the Thunder-wielder.
Over all living men he rules as Sovran, containing all as spokes within the felly.
Source


Here we have again it says He slew the Dragon and it disclosed the waters, and cut in two the channels of mountain torrents. Then it says 'in rapid flow descending the waters glided downward to the ocean.' So here we have huge torrents of waters bursting forth and rushing down the mountain which takes us to this point 'there he lies like a bank bursting river, waters taking courage flow above him. The Dragon lies beneath the feet of torrents...' So could this mean that the Dragon is a glacier, notice how it says this 'Dragon' lies at the bottom of the mountain now and the waters rush over him. This sounds a lot like waters breaking out from a melting glacier then descending down the mountain into a river. It then concludes by saying 'never ceasing currents flowing without a rest forever onward.' Here we have evidence that new rivers were created from these glaciers finally breaking up after melting.

Humans create stories and pass them down. These are still sacred hymns today and great care would have been taken in passing these down without corruption. I do believe the symbolism used is about glacial melt at the end of the ice age. If this is indeed correct then this would be the oldest knowledge passed down by man. What a fantastic thought!






 
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