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Dark-Matter Galaxy Detected: Hidden Dwarf Lurks Nearby?

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posted on Jan, 18 2011 @ 11:46 AM
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A hidden galaxy may be just beyond the Milky Way, part of which is shown over California's Mount Lassen.
Photograph by Wally Pacholka, TWAN
Richard A. Lovett in Seattle, Washington

An entire galaxy may be lurking, unseen, just outside our own, scientists announced Thursday.


The invisibility of "Galaxy X"—as the purported body has been dubbed—may be due less to its apparent status as a dwarf galaxy than to its murky location and its overwhelming amount of dark matter, astronomer Sukanya Chakrabarti speculates.

Detectable only by the effects of its gravitational pull, dark matter is an invisible material that scientists think makes up more than 80 percent of the mass in the universe. (See "Dark Matter Detected for First Time.")

Chakrabarti, of the University of California, Berkeley, devised a technique similar to that used 160 years ago to predict the existence of Neptune, which was given away by the wobbles its gravity induced in Uranus's orbit.

Based on gravitational perturbations of gases on the fringes of our Milky Way galaxy, Chakrabarti came to her conclusion that there's a heretofore unknown dwarf galaxy about 260,000 light-years away.

(Related: "Huge Black Hole Found in Dwarf Galaxy.")

With an estimated mass equal to only one percent the mass of the Milky Way, Galaxy X is still the third largest of the Milky Way's satellite galaxies, Chakrabarti predicts. The two Magellanic are each about ten times larger.

I found this interesting that it has never been detected since it is right next door

link
news.nationalgeographic.com...
edit on 1/18/11 by Ophiuchus 13 because: (no reason given)




posted on Jan, 18 2011 @ 11:51 AM
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Galaxy X



posted on Jan, 18 2011 @ 11:54 AM
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Interesting stuff and nice picture!! S&F

edit on 18-1-2011 by Pittsburgh because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 18 2011 @ 11:55 AM
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reply to post by Pittsburgh
 


Thanks
go steelers!



posted on Jan, 18 2011 @ 12:04 PM
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That picture is amazing


Will this Galaxy X have 'Solar System X's' which have lots of 'Planet X's'?


S&F



posted on Jan, 18 2011 @ 12:09 PM
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Originally posted by doobydoll
That picture is amazing


Will this Galaxy X have 'Solar System X's' which have lots of 'Planet X's'?


S&F


I am not sure my friend but the name does fit well, yes...
Thanks for the input



posted on Jan, 19 2011 @ 08:28 AM
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I think if these types of Galaxies could be studied more there would be a better understanding of objects within them that appear to be hidden from the naked eye. Our eyes may just be tied into certain light frequencies. Thanks to all who added to the thread and take care.

Peace



posted on Jan, 19 2011 @ 03:12 PM
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Originally posted by Ophiuchus 13


A hidden galaxy may be just beyond the Milky Way, part of which is shown over California's Mount Lassen.
Photograph by Wally Pacholka, TWAN
Richard A. Lovett in Seattle, Washington

An entire galaxy may be lurking, unseen, just outside our own, scientists announced Thursday.


The invisibility of "Galaxy X"—as the purported body has been dubbed—may be due less to its apparent status as a dwarf galaxy than to its murky location and its overwhelming amount of dark matter, astronomer Sukanya Chakrabarti speculates.



Detectable only by the effects of its gravitational pull, dark matter is an invisible material that scientists think makes up more than 80 percent of the mass in the universe. (See "Dark Matter Detected for First Time.")

Chakrabarti, of the University of California, Berkeley, devised a technique similar to that used 160 years ago to predict the existence of Neptune, which was given away by the wobbles its gravity induced in Uranus's orbit.

Based on gravitational perturbations of gases on the fringes of our Milky Way galaxy, Chakrabarti came to her conclusion that there's a heretofore unknown dwarf galaxy about 260,000 light-years away.

(Related: "Huge Black Hole Found in Dwarf Galaxy.")

With an estimated mass equal to only one percent the mass of the Milky Way, Galaxy X is still the third largest of the Milky Way's satellite galaxies, Chakrabarti predicts. The two Magellanic are each about ten times larger.

I found this interesting that it has never been detected since it is right next door

link
news.nationalgeographic.com...
edit on 1/18/11 by Ophiuchus 13 because: (no reason given)



Pretty cool, I look forward to hearing more on this ...
edit on 19-1-2011 by VI0811 because: (no reason given)



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