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Over 4000 tourists, including Americans, British and Europeans, held hostage in Chilean Patagonia

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posted on Jan, 17 2011 @ 01:29 PM
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Over 4000 tourists, including Americans, British and Europeans, held hostage in Chilean Patagonia


ireport.cnn.com

Day 4 of a region wide strike is holding over four thousand tourists hostage in Chilean Patagonia. On the night of January 11th, the people of the Magallanes region erected road blocks on every road in the province, stopping all vehicles in their tracks. Roads to the border with Argentina, to the airport and between the region's cities have all been shut down, sealing off the entire region from the outside world and the cities within from each other. The regional capital Punta Arenas is experiencing demonstrations and cars have been burning at the road blocks. On the first day of the strike,
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Jan, 17 2011 @ 01:29 PM
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Well CNN is sensationalizing that one... those tourists are not really ``hostages``...

Yeah they can't leave... but it's because of strikes... and protests... not because they are all at gun point and under the threat of death...

Anyway, that sure isn't funny for those stuck there... especially when you're a foreigner in a country where people are pissed.

It seems being a tourist almost anywhere in the world is getting more and more dangerous.

ireport.cnn.com
(visit the link for the full news article)
edit on 17-1-2011 by Vitchilo because: (no reason given)

edit on 17-1-2011 by Vitchilo because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 17 2011 @ 01:36 PM
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it's like the 'revolution' that got underway in Tunisia is going viral globally

the trapped tourists better hold onto their wallets
there might be this kinda thing going on in Patagonia too, see link below

www.zerohedge.com...



posted on Jan, 17 2011 @ 01:38 PM
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reply to post by Vitchilo
 


True. Any American or persons from other countries who have ever spent any amount of time in a foreign country before knows these things occur and you just limit or change your travel plans until they are over which is usually a matter of days.
edit on 17-1-2011 by manta78 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 17 2011 @ 01:59 PM
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Well other than any inconvenience to the touristas, i do wish the Patagonian peoples success in their bid for justice.
Hopefully this will embolden others to try the same kind of strikes elsewhere.
We need to dislodge the PTB somehow, and through their wallets seems the most effective way....
The power belongs to the people, and it is good to see that the PTB are powerless to stop all the people should they get together on something and persue it with determination.



posted on Jan, 17 2011 @ 02:17 PM
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reply to post by Vitchilo
 


If you get trapped abroad because of the actions of that country's people, can you demand citizenship?

If so, I'm going to Chile. I think I'd enjoy living in Patagonia.



posted on Jan, 17 2011 @ 06:09 PM
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Wow. Take your power back Chileans - and may everyone be safe.



posted on Jan, 19 2011 @ 10:33 AM
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reply to post by Vitchilo
 

I'd suggest you go look up the definition of hostage. I was there and this definition applies to the situation I was in.

a : a person held by one party in a conflict as a pledge pending the fulfillment of an agreement

We were held in the area by the protesters and could not travel through a road block in a vehicle. My group was allowed to walk through one road block so that we could get to Puerto Natales. That involved walking with our luggage about 15 km to the town. Once there, we were able to hire a room and get food. We couldn't leave the town and, honestly, most of us were scared to go outside the hotel. We could not hire anyone to take us to Punta Arenas or to Argentina. They did admit that we could have walked the 350 km to Punta Arenas. We chose not to take that option since it would have put our lives in danger where our lives were not in danger where we were. Had we been, we might have chosen that option.

Even when my group was evacuated by the Red Cross and the Chile Air Force, other people were still waiting to leave the area and could not. By definition, a hostage doesn't always have their lives placed in danger. I was prevented from traveling home so I think I was a hostage.




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