Law proposed makes it illegal for Docs to ask kids about guns in home. 5 years, 5 million dollars pe

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posted on Jan, 17 2011 @ 01:25 PM
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one Central Florida legislator's proposal for a new law is so box-of-rocks awful that it's worth highlighting.
Freshman state Rep. Jason Brodeur wants to tell doctors what they can say — in their own offices.
Specifically, he wants to criminalize questions about guns.

Right now, many pediatricians ask questions of parents to make sure their kids are safe.
"Do you have a pool? Is it fenced in?"
"Do you have any dangerous chemicals in the house? Are they locked up?"
"Do you have a handgun? Is it secure?"
Brodeur wants to make asking the last question a crime.
Any doctor who dares to ask it could be thrown in prison for five years and fined ... up to $5 million.
To put that in perspective, murdering someone in this state carries a fine of up to $15,000.


Loving this tea party movement...

Anyhow, Anyone besides me have a issue with this proposed law? Tell a Doc what to ask in regards to child safety and whats off limits. I see no issues here.
I wonder if big tobacco can buy off the candidates also so they can make it illegal to ask if someone smokes.

America First. (by America, of course its assumed corporate america)




posted on Jan, 17 2011 @ 01:31 PM
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reply to post by SaturnFX
 


Makes me wish I had a child to try this with.....any CCW permit holder, will make the Doc very nervous, dad has one on him now!
So then what does the Doc do?
Sorry but this is kinda silly...I dont care what the doc asks....you are protected by the privacy act anyways ...so I hear.....
But yeah a law...IMO thats a bit of a stretch..

I want my Doc to feel free to ask anything and think he should be able to.....IMHO....
edit on 17-1-2011 by Doc Holiday because: OCD AGAIN MUST FILL IN BLANK SPACES



posted on Jan, 17 2011 @ 01:35 PM
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reply to post by SaturnFX
 



The GOPEA party is all about being hands off

check the link - For freedom!!!


www.theworldforum.net...



posted on Jan, 17 2011 @ 01:36 PM
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Great, more laws, that's what we need. Soon we're all going to be criminals. Oh wait, we already are.

They should have just made it legal to refuse answering that question.



posted on Jan, 17 2011 @ 01:43 PM
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The problem is doctors asking the question in the first place...Guns have absolutely nothing to do with health, no matter how you rationalize it. Chemicals in the house? Bleach-armor all- ajax...I'm sure that's a search for the precursors to meth manufacturing. Stop lobbying the doctors to do detective work.



posted on Jan, 17 2011 @ 01:52 PM
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reply to post by type0civ
 


Completely agree...the question is unnecessary.


And if this is the norm in Florida, shame on them...


And to those supporting the question, how 'bout they start asking kids how much liquor is in the parent's cabinet, or what pills mommy and daddy take on a regular basis..? These items are usually quite accessible and more in the open than a gun - as a generalization of course, but one that fits well with this topic.


edit on 17-1-2011 by facelift because: to add a vowel...



posted on Jan, 17 2011 @ 01:56 PM
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The question is stupid, but what ever happened to simply refusing to answer verses have a law try to punish (with 5 million dollars and prison time) someone for asking a question.

Consider what your in favor of here...shall questions become a crime?



posted on Jan, 17 2011 @ 01:58 PM
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What business is it of anybodys?

Does a doctor ask if there's detergent under the sink, a pool in the yard, heavy objects on a shelf, a dog, electrical outlets without covers, sharp corners, glass, forks or knives?

There is absolutely no conceivable reason why anybody should be asking anyone else that question and even less of a reason to answer the question should you be asked.


 
Posted Via ATS Mobile: m.abovetopsecret.com
 



posted on Jan, 17 2011 @ 02:07 PM
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Doctors shouldn't be asking such question.
Yes there apparently should be a law against it, as we have enough snoopers and pryers already.
The penalty tho, is ridiculously excessive.

The same goes for teachers asking such questions.

None of their business.



posted on Jan, 17 2011 @ 02:50 PM
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Originally posted by SaturnFX
The question is stupid, but what ever happened to simply refusing to answer verses have a law try to punish (with 5 million dollars and prison time) someone for asking a question.

Consider what your in favor of here...shall questions become a crime?



I agree the consequences for asking that question are asinine dude - and to take it further, a question should not have legal consequences, though it's still alright to remind people that there are indeed stupid questions.





So, rather than fine the Doctor, how 'bout policy and procedure is established to prevent these questions from being asked..? Or, if doctors are rated through some system (?) their rating may go down which would affect insurance network visibility or something to that nature...





posted on Jan, 17 2011 @ 06:13 PM
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Originally posted by Doc Holiday
reply to post by SaturnFX
 


Makes me wish I had a child to try this with.....any CCW permit holder, will make the Doc very nervous, dad has one on him now!
So then what does the Doc do?
Sorry but this is kinda silly...I dont care what the doc asks....you are protected by the privacy act anyways ...so I hear.....
But yeah a law...IMO thats a bit of a stretch..

I want my Doc to feel free to ask anything and think he should be able to.....IMHO....
edit on 17-1-2011 by Doc Holiday because: OCD AGAIN MUST FILL IN BLANK SPACES


LOL at the CCW comment; I bet!

The potential punishment and fines are crazy.

But there exists a legitimate reason for the questions, addressed to the child as well as the parent, to be of some concern.

In Florida medical professionals as well as teachers have to report to the Department of Children and Families (DCF) anything that looks like child abuse or child endangerment.

The concern is about a scenario where a total gun-control nut of a doctor asks a kid (not the parent) if there are guns in the house.

Kid says yes.

Doctor asks if they are locked up?

Kid says no, omitting the fact that they each have gunlocks.

Dr. Antigunner drops a dime to DCF, reporting the kid has improper access to guns.

All hell breaks loose at home with DCF accompanied by the LEOs and warrants.

Doctor's shouldn't be asking KIDS about guns in the home.

Doctors should be asking kids how they got that black eye, or how their leg was broken.


The punishment proposed is totally off the deep end though.
edit on 17-1-2011 by mydarkpassenger because: speeling



posted on Jan, 17 2011 @ 06:18 PM
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i dont know why it is necessary to even pass a low like that, You’re the idiot for answering the docs questions in the first place. I would tell the doc to (F) off



posted on Jan, 17 2011 @ 06:26 PM
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reply to post by SaturnFX
 

If I'm reading the article correctly, your thread title is misleading.
Nowhere do I see any reference to the doctors asking the children anything. This is only about what the doctors ask the parents.

I've never come across a doctor who asks invasive, irrelevant questions of myself or kids, but I'd get pretty mad if they did. Not mad enough to want a law against it though.



posted on Jan, 17 2011 @ 11:57 PM
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The only dumb questions are the ones never asked. If you do not like a question asked, you can always refuse to answer it. How would this judge like it if his job was hampered by not asking questions that are relevant. What if the parents are on some anti psychotic drug that is known to have homicidal side effects? It is in the doctors duty of care to asses the risk medications do have. This judge sounds like he is past his used by date.



posted on Jan, 18 2011 @ 12:02 AM
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Originally posted by kwakakev
The only dumb questions are the ones never asked. If you do not like a question asked, you can always refuse to answer it.


Does a child know this? Would a child know the reason a doctor is asking about guns?


imo great law. Another slap in the face of the fraidy cat gun grabbers.



posted on Jan, 18 2011 @ 12:05 AM
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reply to post by The_Zomar
 


Read the article or the thread, it is about asking the parents. No wonder America is a mess, jumping to conclusions regardless of the facts.



posted on Jan, 18 2011 @ 10:28 AM
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Originally posted by kwakakev
reply to post by The_Zomar
 


Read the article or the thread, it is about asking the parents. No wonder America is a mess, jumping to conclusions regardless of the facts.


Right, my bad, it is docs asking parents whom have kids about guns in home..safety and whatnot. Thread title is not intentionally misleading...but rather a product of typing before the brain was engaged.



posted on Feb, 3 2011 @ 01:06 PM
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Originally posted by SaturnFX
The question is stupid, but what ever happened to simply refusing to answer verses have a law try to punish (with 5 million dollars and prison time) someone for asking a question.

Consider what your in favor of here...shall questions become a crime?


The difference is that they ask children when the parent's are not present. Children are more likely to answer than decline because of the doctor's position of authority. I don't think it should be punished in this manner though. I think the state's medical board should just tell doctor's to stop asking. If they ask they can be censured by the board.

The reason I take this stand is because of my experiences when my wife was pregnant. We went to the doctor for pre natal care. The first visit we were handed a long questionare that asked in depth and intrusive questions about the parents's history. There were question about each parent's relationship with their parents, were you ever spanked, do you believe in spanking, did your parents ever touch you in a sexual manner, and other such questions. There were also about fifteen questions about the parents's mental health including, "do you ocassionally feel depressed."

I asked the doctor about some of the questions. She said that the answers went in to a database so that health care providers in their network could spot children more likely to be abused and keep an eye on the parents. In her own words he said that affirming that you believe in spanking will result in doctors calling CPS over more minor bruises and injuries.

After that encounter I started to believe that anything they ask goes in to a database somewhere. Any doctor I go to has the information. Now I reply with the simple answer, "I do not answer questions about how I choose to practice my constitutionally protected rights."

Before anybody comes back and says, "read the article." I know from experiences my cousin and brother-in-law have had, they do ask the kid. Actualy I should say some doctor's do ask the kid when the parent isn't there. Just like they ask kids a second time how they broke their leg.
edit on 3-2-2011 by MikeNice81 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 3 2011 @ 01:20 PM
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Reminds me of the books I've read about Russia during the 50's andf 60's.

I think the importance of this particular attempt is "What precedence does it set?"

Is it there to prevent the new government health care monopoly from using your medical records as a control tool?





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