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Comet Elenin is coming!

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posted on Feb, 6 2011 @ 08:02 PM
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reply to post by lifer201
 


I would not be taking that video on You Tube to seriously if I was you. To suggest that Elenin could perturb Earth from a distant of in excess of 3 AU is just stupidity beyond belief.




posted on Feb, 6 2011 @ 10:57 PM
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reply to post by PuterMan
 


Thanks PuterMan for the very interesting thread!
I have it bookmarked and will be following it for updates.

One thing I noticed in the video ...
www.youtube.com...

At the 3:40 maker it is mentioned that the fellow that discovered it, Leonid ELEnin, was using only and 18" reflecting telescope! This to me is amazing of why it was not discovered earlier? ... or was it?

edit on 6-2-2011 by The6thSUN because: Sorry, don't know how to embed YouTube yet ...



posted on Feb, 6 2011 @ 11:10 PM
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Even at its closest distance to earth, comet elinin will be halfway bewteen earth and venus, and its moving to fast to be captured by earth's or venus's gravity anyways. i wouldnt worry about it! If it wa jupiter, or the sun, then yeah, for sure the comet would be captrued and pulled in. Earth's and Venus's gravity arnt storng enough to capture and pull it in.



posted on Feb, 6 2011 @ 11:12 PM
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Originally posted by The6thSUN
reply to post by PuterMan
 


Thanks PuterMan for the very interesting thread!
I have it bookmarked and will be following it for updates.

One thing I noticed in the video ...
www.youtube.com...

At the 3:40 maker it is mentioned that the fellow that discovered it, Leonid ELEnin, was using only and 18" reflecting telescope! This to me is amazing of why it was not discovered earlier? ... or was it?

edit on 6-2-2011 by The6thSUN because: Sorry, don't know how to embed YouTube yet ...



I often wonder the same thing. I know it seems a stretch, but if you recall the movie "Deep Impact", the comet's name was E.L.E which was an acronym for Extinction Life Event. Also, the boy's name ,who discovered it in the movie, was Leo.

Who knows when it was really discovered, another stretch would be to presume that the movie is fiction, based on FACT, and was written as a buffer to the sheeple.
Just a theory.



posted on Feb, 7 2011 @ 01:13 AM
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reply to post by makinit66
 


The comets name was not E.L.E. Which stands for Extinction Level Event. The comets name was Wolfe- Beiterman
named after the two who discovered it. Leo Beiterman and Something Wolfe W/E.
edit on 7-2-2011 by randyvs because: (no reason given)

edit on 7-2-2011 by randyvs because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 7 2011 @ 09:10 AM
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reply to post by The6thSUN
 


Let me ask you some questions.
  • Have you ever looked up into the sky on a starry night and seen how many stars there are?
  • Have you then got a pair of binoculars and taken a look for a particular star? Very difficult even with as low power as binoculars. There are now another 3000 stars in your vision that you could not see before.
  • Have you then tried to locate a planet or a star using a small telescope? I have problems getting the Moon into the viewer let alone Jupiter.
  • If you have done the last one, have you noticed how quickly the object vanishes out of the view?


If you have not done any of these you should try them! I am continually amazed that they spot ANYTHING let along a small ball of rock a few metres across at a distance of something like 300,000,000 miles!!

Of course they use photos and compare one to another to see what has changed to find these things. Even so, many get missed because of size or if they are 'black bodies', i.e. not reflecting any light.

edit on 7/2/2011 by PuterMan because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 7 2011 @ 09:49 AM
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Originally posted by randyvs
reply to post by makinit66
 


The comets name was not E.L.E. Which stands for Extinction Level Event. The comets name was Wolfe- Beiterman
named after the two who discovered it. Leo Beiterman and Something Wolfe W/E.
edit on 7-2-2011 by randyvs because: (no reason given)

edit on 7-2-2011 by randyvs because: (no reason given)



I stand corrected. The name was Wolf-Beiderman. However, they did refer to it as E.L.E.
edit on 10/12/2009 by makinit66 because: spelling error



posted on Feb, 7 2011 @ 09:55 AM
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I'm not particularly worried about the comet itself. That seems as though it will merely give us a light show. What I AM worried about, though, is that we will be passing through a very fresh comet debris field about a month after it passes us by.



posted on Feb, 7 2011 @ 10:05 AM
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reply to post by makinit66
 


Basacally you are correct. I just have a habit, of doing that so, some other person, dosn't come along and take
that for gospel. Then go blabbin around the net saying, it was ATS what did it.
blah blah blah blahblahblah!

Gnostic

[quote
I'm not particularly worried about the comet itself. That seems as though it will merely give us a light show. What I AM worried about, though, is that we will be passing through a very fresh comet debris field about a month after it passes us by.

Me either. It's that quarter mile chunk that might break off that worries me.
edit on 7-2-2011 by randyvs because: (no reason given)


There again another simalarty. In the movie the comet breaks into two pieces after being nuked.
edit on 7-2-2011 by randyvs because: (no reason given)

edit on 7-2-2011 by randyvs because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 7 2011 @ 10:41 AM
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Well, we went through the tail of Halley in 1910. Camille Flammarion apparently believed the gas “would impregnate the atmosphere and possibly snuff out all life on the planet." But here we all are


Hope it's as good as McNaught; that really gave folks in the Southern Hemisphere a show. I managed to see it in the evening twilight; couldn't believe how easy it was to spot. It was about magnitude -2 then, I think.


edit on 7-2-2011 by BrownDwarfStar because: just because.



posted on Feb, 7 2011 @ 12:23 PM
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After looking at the JPL sight and regressing back to the date of the Chilean earthquake which occurred on Feb 27th, 2010.
The comet Elenin had recently passed through the alignment with the earth and the sun and at a distance of 6.0 AU and coincided with the the 8.8 earthquake in Chile.

Fast forward to March 15 of this year, the date of our next alignment with Elenin and the SUN, but Elenin is significantly closer at only 2 AU from earth.
This could mean an even stronger effect upon our planet poles.

I believe that that was the fundamental theme of her message.



posted on Feb, 7 2011 @ 12:28 PM
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Originally posted by nh_ee


After looking at the JPL sight and regressing back to the date of the Chilean earthquake which occurred on Feb 27th, 2010.
The comet Elenin had recently passed through the alignment with the earth and the sun and at a distance of 6.0 AU and coincided with the the 8.8 earthquake in Chile.

Fast forward to March 15 of this year, the date of our next alignment with Elenin and the SUN, but Elenin is significantly closer at only 2 AU from earth.
This could mean an even stronger effect upon our planet poles.

I believe that that was the fundamental theme of her message.


Thank you for that. I've STILL yet to see any scientific data that backs up the true size of this object and/or it's composition. If it's a Venus sized magnet, we could be in for a hell of a ride as we've already had a taste of at a distance of 6.0 AU



posted on Feb, 7 2011 @ 01:27 PM
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reply to post by PuterMan
 


Actually I am a 'backyard astronomer' ... or at least I do have a telescope and can spot the more obvious constellations and planets

That is what makes this so interesting to me, that an 18" lens could have found this verses the 3' lens that some observatories have. It makes one ponder, why was this just discovered now?



posted on Feb, 7 2011 @ 04:09 PM
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reply to post by The6thSUN
 



Actually I am a 'backyard astronomer' ... or at least I do have a telescope and can spot the more obvious constellations and planets


Which was why I asked those as questions. You know therefore how difficult it is to get lined up on a small object - and to hold it there.


That is what makes this so interesting to me, that an 18" lens could have found this verses the 3' lens that some observatories have. It makes one ponder, why was this just discovered now?


Right place, right time? Oh and back at ya



posted on Feb, 7 2011 @ 09:44 PM
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Originally posted by gnosticquasar
What I AM worried about, though, is that we will be passing through a very fresh comet debris field about a month after it passes us by.



There really isn't anything to worry about. The encounter between Elenin's dust trail and Earth is not very close compared to many encounters we have had with cometary dust trails in recent history. It's just .0306115 AU as it stands.

Back in 1999, a dust trail produced by comet Tempel-Tuttle (The parent comet of the Leonid meteor shower) in 1899, encountered Earth at a distance of 0.00065 AU according to Mikhail Maslov who is a well known researcher in the field. His calculations and predictions match very well with those of Esko Lyytinen and Markku Nissinen (URSA Astronomical Association, Meteor section), who also predict an encounter distance of 0.0016.

This encounter produced a Leonid meteor storm that peaked at an actual rate of over 3000 per hour.


Before that, in 1966 the same dust trail (1899) was encountered by Earth at a distance of only 0.00015 AU.

This produced a very strong meteor storm with a rate of 40-50 meteors per second!


Ed Cunnius was six-years old in 1966 and living on his parent's ranch in north Texas. He related the following account to me in October 1998
My mom woke me up that morning and told me to put on a coat and come outside. I don't know the exact time. We normally had to get up at six o'clock, and it was well before then--probably around five. I couldn't imagine what was going on, but it had to be something pretty exciting if I could wear my pajamas outside. As I ran out of the house, I remember my dad standing in the yard, quietly staring at the sky. I could see the reason even before I was completely out the doorÑthe sky was covered with meteors, all seeming to rain straight down. My dad explained that this was a "meteor shower" and that my grandfather had called to wake us up so we could see it. Facing east, I looked up and into the "center" of the storm where the meteors were so fast and constant it looked as if the earth were rushing through the stars. As it began to get lighter and the sky turned from black to dark blue; a gigantic fireball fell in the west leaving a visible smoke trail. It was bright enough to overpower the predawn sky-glow, turning the whole sky a pale blue-green. We watched until the sun came up. I don't remember the rates tapering off much, just that the very faint meteors became harder and harder to see. All morning faint, short-tailed meteors had provided a kind of scratchy background to the brighter rain of material. From that night on, anytime the weatherman announced a meteor shower was on the way, I would fully expect another spectacle like the Leonids. I was jaded at the age of six by the storm of the century.

Source: GARY W. KRONK'S COMETS & METEOR SHOWERS

As the term "dust trail" suggests, the meteoroids that make up the dust trail are very small (the vast majority of meteors that you can see are produced by meteoroids no larger than sand grains), although there are meteoroids that are pebble-sized which are much less frequent, and capable of producing the brighter meteors which we call "fireballs" like the one mentioned in the account above. Even very bright fireballs can be produced by relatively small meteoroids.

Initially, when the trail is very fresh, all the meteoroids will be close to the core of the trail, but we know that over time the meteoroids gradually drift further and further away from the core. However, the larger the meteoroid is, the less it will move away since it takes more energy to move it a certain distance. This means that any larger fragments will tend to stay very close to the core, even after a long time.

So, if we go back to your original statement, it actually makes no sense to worry that we are encountering the dust trail so soon after the comet has passed by and at a relatively long distance since all the bigger meteoroids will be close to the core.

As it stands (unless there is a further favorable correction in the orbit) we are unlikely to see a significant meteor shower from this since we are so far away from the core of the dust trail, let alone an impact from a large fragment - which is pure speculation anyway since no one has ever proved that any historical impact has been directly (or indirectly for that matter) connected with a cometary dust trail.

There are many historical anecdotes which relate to either meteor showers or large impacts, but none that include both, which is what you would expect if the two were connected.

As I noted in my previous posts to this thread, the space which Earth passes through is littered with the dust trails of comets (we have observations going back over 1000 years), both recent and ancient, yet large scale impacts are extremely rare, although there is no doubt they have occurred in the past, and will continue to in the future.

Personally I would love to see a a very close encounter with the dust trail of a comet, but in this case it looks like it will be a "damp squib".
edit on 7-2-2011 by C.H.U.D. because: fixed broken link

edit on 7-2-2011 by C.H.U.D. because: edit for clarity

edit on 7-2-2011 by C.H.U.D. because: one more link added



posted on Feb, 8 2011 @ 03:05 AM
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why is this not higher on the forum lists...almost 300 flags and i had to search for it....also is anyone else noticing the date is jan 22nd on all the posts?
edit on 01/22/2011 by Drala because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 8 2011 @ 08:20 AM
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Originally posted by Drala
why is this not higher on the forum lists...almost 300 flags and i had to search for it....also is anyone else noticing the date is jan 22nd on all the posts?
edit on 01/22/2011 by Drala because: (no reason given)


I think it's a comp glitch....all my dates are oct 2009 (which was when I joined ATS) wish I knew how to fix it.



posted on Feb, 8 2011 @ 11:24 AM
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reply to post by The6thSUN
 


Here is another one for you!


Newly-discovered asteroid 2011 CA7 is going to fly past Earth on Feb. 9th only 63,000 miles away, or 1/4th the distance to the Moon. At closest approach around 1700 UT, the VW-Bug-sized space rock will zip through the constellation Orion glowing like a 17th magnitude star.


Ephemeris
Orbit

Spaceweather

Now go back one day

No 4 metre rock!

They definitely can miss them!

edit on 8/2/2011 by PuterMan because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 8 2011 @ 11:37 AM
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reply to post by C.H.U.D.
 


As a matter of interest what approximate size object would be capable of making landfall.

Brick?, concrete block?



posted on Feb, 8 2011 @ 11:00 PM
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If last years Chilean 8.8 was partially from Elenin, and as I suggested in my other thread our alignment is going to be a harmonic distance with us in the resonance point between the sun and this other body....picture how they show you magentic field lines...they operate like octaves in the mathmatical sense(everything vibrates and rotates to the same Phi relationships)...and the fields of the sun and the fields of Elinin are going to overlap on the earth possibly...

"IF" it was large enough to influence the 8.8 last year, it COULD influence alot more if we line up again this march...do not rule it out so readily....better to judge what aug-nov will be like after we see if there is an event around Mar15th. This could be a great ay to judge potential for the fall....
edit on 01/22/2011 by Drala because: (no reason given)







 
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