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Tunisia PM to announce new government

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posted on Jan, 16 2011 @ 08:20 PM
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Tunisia PM to announce new government


www.reuters.com

Tunisian special forces fought a gun battle with the ousted president's security force near the presidential palace on Sunday, a military source said, two days after Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali was ousted after more than 23 years as president.

But Prime Minister Mohamed Ghannouchi promised rapid action to fill the power vacuum.

"Tomorrow we will announce the new government which will open a new page in the history of Tunisia," he said in a brief statement on Sunday.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Jan, 16 2011 @ 08:20 PM
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They are calling for free elections, but I doubt that the old boss will be different from the new boss.

Most of the political heavy hitters are former supporters of the previous president, so you can't expect anything radically different underneath the surface.

Expect a lot of chest beating, and broken promises, with little to show for it. My pryers go out to the people of this nation who have suffered, are suffering and will suffer under what they believe to be real change.

www.reuters.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Jan, 16 2011 @ 08:30 PM
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This, I'm afraid is just the beginning.
Africa is the new Iraq, in terms of US intervention and civil war.
edit on 16-1-2011 by macman because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 16 2011 @ 09:06 PM
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I wonder what part the good old CIA played in this one?



posted on Jan, 16 2011 @ 10:01 PM
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reply to post by nerbot
 


Apparently, it was the suicide of the student and the wikileaks revelations about Tunisia that gave the "rebels" the impetus to act. Sometimes, you know, the CIA isn't involved and good old human nature plays through.

If the new Government doesn't act to correct the mistakes of the past, the Tunisians, emboldened by recent events, will not likely skirk from another rebellion.



posted on Jan, 16 2011 @ 10:03 PM
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Already?

Good for them, if there's nothing hiding behind the curtains.




posted on Jan, 16 2011 @ 11:38 PM
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Originally posted by stumason
reply to post by nerbot
 


Apparently, it was the suicide of the student and the wikileaks revelations about Tunisia that gave the "rebels" the impetus to act. Sometimes, you know, the CIA isn't involved and good old human nature plays through.

If the new Government doesn't act to correct the mistakes of the past, the Tunisians, emboldened by recent events, will not likely skirk from another rebellion.


Many here aren't so sure about Wikileaks intentions to begin with, and I will look further into the suicide issue. However, who's funding the "rebels"?



posted on Jan, 17 2011 @ 06:00 AM
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reply to post by stumason
 


Yes, I remember posting a link to the Tunisian corruption cables a while ago. It made my blood boil to read them, I guess lhe locals there felt the same and finally did something about it. Nobody should be immune to those seeking justice.

Maybe the CIA have a hand in Wikileaks.



posted on Jan, 17 2011 @ 06:55 AM
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The world hasn't really picked up the story yet, but it is huge for Tunisia. With the former Powers of Control leaving the country could end up in civil war, but for now they only protect their neighbourhood without serious incidents. Ok I feel sorry for that Swedish group, but as they said so themselves, "We can understand them",

Cnn:
What's going on in Tunisia?



posted on Jan, 17 2011 @ 08:08 AM
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I'm rather surprised this doesn't get more attention around here, it's big news ever since the protests started early december. Since then Tunisia had:

mass protests,
riots,
army intervention,
too many dead protesters,
a president on the run,
repatriation of all foreigners,
troops and officers that are still loyal to Ben Ali,
the presidential family banished from France,
a president, his wife and high officials smuggling tons of gold and money out of the country,
a new government of the three opposition parties ...

reply to post by nerbot
 

I believe what we see happening in Tunisia is a genuine takeover by the people, call it a revolution - there's no orchestrated scenario happening. Ben Ali was in position for over 23 years and favored by all western countries, it's Tunisian people who decided they had enough of the corrupt policy their government administered.

This is the first time since very long that we witness an emancipatory movement of the people in a North-African - broader Middle-East country. I have some optimism on the possible outcome, since all was started by younger progressive middle class students and other civilians, supported by most Tunisians. It's not an Islamic protest movement, it's a revolution of the people based on economic and social means.

We'll see how it evolves, but I have good hopes for Tunisia.



posted on Jan, 17 2011 @ 09:48 AM
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Originally posted by Movhisattva
reply to post by nerbot
 

I believe what we see happening in Tunisia is a genuine takeover by the people, call it a revolution - there's no orchestrated scenario happening. Ben Ali was in position for over 23 years and favored by all western countries, it's Tunisian people who decided they had enough of the corrupt policy their government administered.


Yes, the Tunisians have had enough.

It's mainly the extended family of Ben Ali that has caused most of the outrage I think. Being a member of "the family" has been a licence to be corrupt. I'm not surprised many world leaders and businessmen have supported him over the years, it's been in their interest to look after their own, those that can make them money at the cost of the everyday people.

Good luck to Tunisian Citizens and I hope these kind of actions become contagious.



posted on Jan, 17 2011 @ 01:51 PM
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Originally posted by nerbot
Good luck to Tunisian Citizens and I hope these kind of actions become contagious.


One might hope so indeed.
Although it would be better if these actions weren't followed by the foolish decision to open fire at protesters.
Also, it seems there is no satisfying alternative to place in power at this moment. Pending new elections, six heads of the old regime stay in place, together with some opposition members and members of civil society.

The new coalition released all political prisoners and they start to figure out how to legalize the now forbidden political parties. The Human Rights League is allowed and the Ministry of Information is closed down on accusation of boycotting freedom of speech.

However, this temporary 'unity government' isn't accepted by the Tunisians, people keep protesting, saying all members of the old regime should step away from powerful positions. Historical opposition leader Moncef Marzouki called the new government 'a masquerade' for still having the same politicians in power.

Tunisian youth are all focused on 'their' revolution right now, striving for more democracy and freedom - no doubt it will take time before all is well and in balance.

edit on 17/1/11 by Movhisattva because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 17 2011 @ 03:42 PM
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I was hearing that they had something like three or four presidents in a two hour time frame? What craziness is going on over there?



posted on Jan, 17 2011 @ 03:56 PM
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I wish the Tunisians all the best of luck in their attempt to get rid of their evil leaders. Its about time the rest of us did the same. Dosnt matter where you are from. The same `evil leaders` rule the world, disguised as decent honest politiciens. Which is an oxi moron if ever I heard it. Decent honest politiciens? hahaha What like bush? or blair? Or any of the other world leaders.



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