It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Should Mexican Cartels Be Labeled Terrorist Organizations?

page: 5
14
<< 2  3  4   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on May, 13 2011 @ 06:03 AM
link   
No.. because their ultimate goal isn't to terrify, it's to get you hiiiiigh.




posted on May, 13 2011 @ 04:19 PM
link   

Originally posted by GogoVicMorrow
No.. because their ultimate goal isn't to terrify, it's to get you hiiiiigh.


My response to your reply is to repeat a portion of a post from page 4 of this thread:

"Mexico's drug cartels deserve to be on this list. When someone goes to the trouble -- repeatedly -- to kill people and saw off their arms and legs, then dump the corpses on the street, that person is trying very deliberately to terrorize a population. When corpses are hung from overpasses to send a message to everyone who sees it, that's terrorism. When 35,000 people are killed in six years, and entire cities show no activity on the streets after dusk because of the fear of being murdered or kidnapped, that's terrorism. When the same groups go after journalists, police officers, soldiers and public officials -- killing and/or torturing anyone who gets in their way, that's terrorism."



posted on May, 13 2011 @ 05:57 PM
link   
reply to post by manta78
 


So essentially you are a Prohibitionist and anyone that puts up an armed resistance to prohibition is a terrorist?



posted on May, 13 2011 @ 06:13 PM
link   

Originally posted by Erongaricuaro
reply to post by manta78
 


So essentially you are a Prohibitionist and anyone that puts up an armed resistance to prohibition is a terrorist?


Your words, not mine, however inaccurate. Let me guess that you fall within the the supporters/followers of persons who actually believe this guy (Aturo Sarukhan's) line of bull:


More than 150 Mexican news outlets have reported over the past week about the controversy surrounding Ambassador Arturo Sarukhan's unusual defense of his nation's most murderous drug cartels as being like businessmen who engage in "mergers" and "hostile takeovers""

(from the page 4 link)

For someone who is an expat, and an ex fed (supposedly) and now living in Mexico, in a place or near an area of known heavy drug cartel activity, you have some mightly strange ideas. Let me guess, you were formerly associated with the D.E.A. and that didn't work out too well for you?









edit on 5/13/2011 by manta78 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 13 2011 @ 08:26 PM
link   
reply to post by manta78
 


Former DoD and by mid-decade of the 2000's I was tired of playing the world's schoolyard bully.

I live in Morelia and they keep telling me, the State Dept. with their advisories and the US media in particular, that I live in a dangerous area, but coming from Southern California coast it seems a lot less dangerous here even though there is a propensity for the people to take law enforcement matters into their own hands - which BTW is how we end up with that kidnapper/extortionist hanging from an overpass. We all of course miss him dearly, such a credit to our community as he was.

Sorry, I don't know of the person you quoted - and don't recall the name since that is not on my screen at the moment - but I think essentially he was correct, it is a business, just like in the US with a lot of politicians in their pockets and surreptitiously on their side, along with payroll too most likely. It does have a particular Mexican flavor to it which makes it seem strange to the US onlookers. I think what is important to keep in mind is that they didn't start that prohibition war but a profitable niche was carved-out for anyone taking the initiative to exploit it.

If you hadn't guessed by now I am a critic of prohibition. I believe the mere nature of the beast creates more corruption and crime than it could ever possibly deter. There are much more insidious reasons for perpetuating it than the average uninvolved person could begin to imagine, and reasons that stretch beliefs that one's own government could ever be so under-handed, but nevertheless true. One very popular and relatively benign substance could have been greenlighted ages ago and made the rest of the mess much more enforceable and popular of a war. When one examines why that was not done but instead the heat turned-up on it the reasons begin to become much more transparent and questionable. One must be convinved then that these laws, this war, is not in place for the good of the people.

One particular "cartel" seems to have been put in place by US intel/black-ops alphabet agency - to what end is wide-open for broad speculation, and if you don't speculate broadly enough you will miss the reason completely. When you hear about heads rolling across the floor, literally, one must keep in mind these are not random acts of violence perpetrated against honor students and women doing their family shopping - as in my old California town. Heads roll for a reason here, it is to give a message, and it is to say that the organized family in my state is acutely aware of other factions moving into our area and bringing some very bad things with it. The media runs away with this, and if it had its way it would let that bad element come in and take over completely. People just aren't getting or understanding the bigger picture about what is happening here.

Do you honestly think this whole Drug War is being waged for the good of the people - people meaning the common citizen or national? Would it surprise you to learn this is more a matter of a very large and corrupt faction trying to gain total control over a situation that would have as a major part of its method to perpetuate the madness in order to increase its profit and domination over every aspect of its power?

The true terrorists here are the prohibitionists. The unrest created by this War is the terror that is created in the communities and on the streets. And if that hasn't gotten the people completely convinced that they are living in a war zone, the media is being used to augment that perception. The Mexican people have been dealing with such tactics for more than 200 years and remain unconvinced that it is how the media wants to report it. But nearly every knee-jerk redneck American is more than ready to want to come in and lay waste to Mexico for a problem the US is putting so much effort into creating.



posted on May, 14 2011 @ 12:42 AM
link   
post removed for serious violation of ATS Terms & Conditions



posted on May, 14 2011 @ 01:23 AM
link   
I think pedo priests should be classified as terrorists.
But eh, its a game of pick and choose.
Remember the taliban were once "freedom fighters"
BAHAHAHHAHA



posted on Jul, 12 2011 @ 07:12 PM
link   
reply to post by manta78
 


In a word:

Yes.

Absolutely. If that's what it takes, so be it.



posted on Jul, 12 2011 @ 07:42 PM
link   

reply to Erongaricuaro


If anything, cartels are PRO-prohibition. Why would they want to lower the street value of their drugs? They are getting a good penny for it now, legalization would only hurt their profit margin.

Besides, if they really were fighting prohibition, they could put their money where their mouth was and throw it into our political system.

Well they probably do--to keep things just the way they are.


Put me down for "terrorist", however--I think we should spend our time bolstering our border...not blowing up another country
edit on 7/12/11 by Tharsis because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 12 2011 @ 07:43 PM
link   
double post
edit on 7/12/11 by Tharsis because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 12 2011 @ 07:44 PM
link   
i guess that would mean you call drug users, terrorist supporters and freeze their bank accounts too.......



posted on Jul, 12 2011 @ 08:48 PM
link   

Originally posted by purplemer
i guess that would mean you call drug users, terrorist supporters and freeze their bank accounts too.......


I remember them trying that already, back in the days of freezing assets. Couldn't get it to fly far enough. People could sense what was coming. They knew to cut the heat a bit.

That is the problem in Mexico right now, the Drug War is boiling over. Sentiment is shifting toward considering lifting prohibition. Neither the authorities nor the criminal want that, too good a cash cow to slaughter. If they want to preserve their black economy they need to cut things back to a simmer.

Even a cease-fire would benefit Mexico right now, the Mexican people that is. Election year coming the Drug War is not popular. Nothing short of eliminating Prohibition will eliminate the problem, but a slow-down in hostilities would be a welcome change. Would solve nothing though.


edit on 12-7-2011 by Erongaricuaro because: (no reason given)



new topics

top topics



 
14
<< 2  3  4   >>

log in

join